Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:Soon to be patched (Score 1) 325

by mi (#48023359) Attached to: Bash To Require Further Patching, As More Shellshock Holes Found

It's Ubuntu, so whatever their market share is.

Not much. RedHat/CentOS dominate — and they are vulnerable...

It is also an OSX bug, an HPUX bug, a vxWorks bug, and, well, really, a bug in any OS that has bash installed

Not quite. Merely having it installed is not enough. Placing it into the all-important role of /bin/shthat is what makes it particularly dangerous — and a bug of whatever OS does such a thing.

You may have all your CGI-scripts written in Perl or Lisp, but if you use system() anywhere to spawn off a different program, then you are exposed to this problem on those systems.

Whether or not Ubuntu and CentOS are different OSes or just different distributions, is a matter of semantics...

Comment: Re:Soon to be patched (Score 1) 325

by mi (#48023163) Attached to: Bash To Require Further Patching, As More Shellshock Holes Found

I'm going to guess RedHat or CentOS?

Yep.

Observe (from one of my production systems)

What is the market share of your Linux-distribution?

My point is that this is not a Linux bug, it is a bash bug.

It absolutely is a bash bug, yes. It is also a bug in any Linux, that makes it /bin/sh.

Comment: Re:Soon to be patched (Score 1) 325

by mi (#48021643) Attached to: Bash To Require Further Patching, As More Shellshock Holes Found

having absolutely nothing to do with Linux.

Oh, it has plenty to do with Linux, because if you happen to use that OS, even putting the #!/bin/sh at the top still makes you vulnerable. Observe:

% ls -l /bin/sh
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 4 Sep 26 15:55 /bin/sh -> bash

I said that already, you chose to ignore it for some reason...

And then, of course, comes the system(3) call, which invokes /bin/sh too...

Comment: Re:Soon to be patched (Score 2) 325

by mi (#48020877) Attached to: Bash To Require Further Patching, As More Shellshock Holes Found

Neither bug was a Linux bug, though both affected Linux systems

Arguably, the bug in Linux was in that it chose to use a program as large and complicated as bash as its idea of /bin/sh.

Though bash is, of course, available on all other OSes, no one else makes it the interpreter behind most of the system's own scripts as well as the system(3) function.

Comment: Re:Referendum at sea (Score 1) 199

by mi (#48020629) Attached to: Exxon and Russian Operation Discovers Oil Field Larger Than the Gulf of Mexico

Firstly, the surrounding islands and mainland are already occupied - in many cases by Russian nuclear missile bases

You only need one island — no matter, how small — to make a claim.

Secondly - you did notice that the country you're planning to invade has nuclear weapons, didn't you?

So do we. As long as we aren't attacking anyone, but simply building a peaceful house, there is no fighting...

People like you

Yeah, sure. It is all about me... Ad hominem much? BTW, you misspelled the "neo-KKKonz"...

Comment: Re:Striking air traffic controllers fired (Score 1) 221

by mi (#48020197) Attached to: Nearly 2,000 Chicago Flights Canceled After Worker Sets Fire At Radar Center

FAA has a monopoly on hiring air traffic controllers

Yes, and Pentagon has a monopoly power to hire soldiers. It is a governmental organization and any government is a monopoly by definition (which is a good reason to keep its responsibilities to a minimum, but that's another story).

Unions exist because a single employee does not have bargaining power against a corporation.

Which corporation were the air-traffic controllers bargaining with, when Reagan crushed them? Hint: public employees (be they air controllers or policemen) aren't struggling against any corporations — their employers are the taxpayers. They should not be allowed to unionize — and certainly, not strike:

strike of public employees manifests nothing less than an intent on their part to obstruct the operations of government until their demands are satisfied. Such action looking toward the paralysis of government by those who have sworn to support it is unthinkable and intolerable

Franklin Delano Roosevelt

Without them, we'd be working 10 hours a day, 6 days a week with no benefits.

Really? So, if we get the current abysmal union-membership to, say, above 80%, we'll only have to work one day a week? For 2 hours? Wouldn't that be great!!

People aren't the same as products.

People — workers — choose to sell their labor on the free market to the willing buyers. Any attempts to make that market not free should be met with the same energetic response Standard Oil and AT&T have encountered, when they tried to become a monopoly.

They have basic needs and human rights that we prefer them to have.

Any smart employer addresses basic needs of the workers — in order to keep them happy and thus more productive. No employer is allowed to violate human rights — unions or not...

Comment: Re:Sanctions against Russia -- Obama's staying pow (Score 1) 199

by mi (#48020037) Attached to: Exxon and Russian Operation Discovers Oil Field Larger Than the Gulf of Mexico

Yeah.... but sanctions really only send a message in the moment you apply them...

There, there. "It is complicated"... GP was accusing RethugliKKKans of wanting to end sanctions against Russia in exchange for oil. You seem to be supporting such a maneuver.

Also it doesn't make sense to carry a grudge forever... Sometimes it's better to just move along.

Any sanctions imposed in retaliation for a certain deed — such as Russia's invasion into Afghanistan, Georgia or Ukraine — must last until the deed is reversed.

Lifting the punishment prematurely — as Obama did in 2010 — simply sends the aggressor the following signal: outlast the current American Administration and you can keep, whatever you gained. Had Obama kept (and ratcheted up) the pressure on Russia instead of lifting the sanctions, imposing new ones over Russian attack on Ukraine might even have been necessary — for no such attack would've taken place...

Comment: Re:Sanctions against Russia -- Obama's staying pow (Score 1) 199

by mi (#48019957) Attached to: Exxon and Russian Operation Discovers Oil Field Larger Than the Gulf of Mexico

Funny how Libya under Ghadaffi got a get out of jail free card

It was not "free". In order to "get out of jail", Qaddafi had to acknowledge Libya being behind the Lockerbie bombing, and pay restitution to the victims' kin. That was, what was demanded of him and he complied (shortly after seeing Saddam Hussein being pulled from a hiding hole).

There was no other "beef" with him — unlike Iran, Libya did not seek nuclear weapons, nor was it providing anything better than "moral" support to any other terrorists.

That Obama — eager to show, that the sophisticated progressives can fight wars better, than the oil-thirsty KKKonservatives — chose to attack Mr. Ghadaffi anyway, was shameful treachery, which is bound to make any future "conversions" of foreign tyrants that much harder...

Comment: Sanctions against Russia -- Obama's staying power (Score 2) 199

by mi (#48016313) Attached to: Exxon and Russian Operation Discovers Oil Field Larger Than the Gulf of Mexico

Time until Republicans start saying "Lift sanctions" 5...4..3..2...1

Last time it was your boy-wonder, who lifted the sanctions against Russia... Abandoning American ally Georgia for the sake of Putin's help against Iran. Ha-ha — much good did it do then...

Comment: Referendum at sea (Score 1) 199

by mi (#48016297) Attached to: Exxon and Russian Operation Discovers Oil Field Larger Than the Gulf of Mexico

Hopefully America will seize the territory from the Russians, enemies of the world.

I can see that already. Find a small rock in that see and build a shelter on it — nothing fancy, as long as a SEAL can survive on it for a day or two. Place a retired SEAL on it. Organize a referendum on the rock on whether or not the "residents" wish for their territory to become part of the United States. Claim the land &mdash and the surrounding waters — as American.

PROFIT!

Comment: Re:Striking air traffic controllers fired (Score 1) 221

by mi (#48016233) Attached to: Nearly 2,000 Chicago Flights Canceled After Worker Sets Fire At Radar Center

That's how strikes work - they cripple their industry as an extreme resort for bargaining purposes.

Sure. All monopolies work that way — this is why we have anti-monopoly laws. We just aren't applying them to unions for some mysterious reasons, even though — letter by letter — that's exactly, what they are. Monopolies seeking to maintain and ever increase the prices of what their members are selling (labor).

If the US saw fit to block a merger of Staples and Office Depot — for fear of the resulting entity dominating the market of the freaking office supplies, how come we not merely tolerate, but encourage monopolies in the market of law-enforcement, teaching, healthcare, and construction labor?

A union would have been able to negotiate better pay and working conditions.

Hanging a couple of grievance-mongers would've improved the morale just as well — and cost much less, don't you think?

Seriously, nobody is forcing people to become — and remain — air-traffic controllers. We don't have slavery — not even indentured labor — and have a reasonably free market. If one remains on the job, then it must be good enough for him to not seek an alternative...

Comment: Re:Striking air traffic controllers fired (Score 1) 221

by mi (#48016203) Attached to: Nearly 2,000 Chicago Flights Canceled After Worker Sets Fire At Radar Center

Ah, yes, the big, bad UNION .

Yes, them. Labor unions are nothing but monopolies (or wanna-be monopolies), whose sole official purpose is maintaining and increasing the prices, their members can charge. As such, they ought to be treated to the anti-monopoly laws as well as, when the members break the law (for the union's sake) with the federal RICO law — as racketeer-influenced and corrupt organizations — rather than have each beating, shooting, or property destruction treated as isolated crimes committed by individual members on their own.

On top of it, any union, whose connection to the bona-fide crime is proven (even if it is just a single union official), must be disbanded automatically and immediately — the innocent members, who wish to unionize again, can do so under a new name later.

Both are doing it for profit for the companies and directly against the interest of their own employees.

They do. But they've grown to become that way naturally — not by using the law to force others to join them, as the unions are legally empowered to do.

What about the collusion among tech companies to not hire each other's employees?

Such collusions — if they are legal to begin with — are not supported by the existing law. Very much unlike the unionization — whereby a group of employees may vote to "unionize" a particular workplace and then they get to force other employees to join their union as well as prevent the employer from hiring outside of the union.

Sure, people ought to be free to associate with each other. But labor unions have much more law on their side, than a church club or a bowling league. And that just should not be the case...

Comment: Re:The kinder, gentler terrorism (Score 1) 221

by mi (#48007691) Attached to: Nearly 2,000 Chicago Flights Canceled After Worker Sets Fire At Radar Center

Perhaps you are confused about which side the NSA is on.

Seems like one of us is confused indeed. They are on America's side and they are sincere. They will not act on a threat — such as a prankster talking about a terrorist act on his phone — if they consider it bogus. Now, it may be possible for such a prankster to fool them — and they may choose to err on the side of caution. But they are quite smart, so fooling them is not easy...

Comment: Re:Striking air traffic controllers fired (Score 5, Interesting) 221

by mi (#48006329) Attached to: Nearly 2,000 Chicago Flights Canceled After Worker Sets Fire At Radar Center

Remember when Ronald Reagan fired all of the air traffic controllers because they had the nerve to form a union and strike for better pay?

You mean, when they conspired to cripple the nation's air-transportation — holding the rest of us hostage? Imagine, Verizon turning off all telephones to demand lower taxes — a public employee has an even stronger monopoly power...

Now the air traffic controllers work on obsolete equipment, get paid very little, have a stressful job with long hours

That must all be Reagan's fault, right, 30 years later...

I am almost amazed no one has gone crazy before now.

Maybe, it just is not quite as bad as you are describing?

The clearest way into the Universe is through a forest wilderness. -- John Muir

Working...