Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:USA government already ahead of industry on thi (Score 1) 232

by mgbastard (#41395037) Attached to: Apple's Secret Plan To Join iPhones With Airport Security

We have RFID tags in our passports already, so they are already moving us towards electronic IDs. It's a foregone conclusion that the type of ID done for international flights will eventually crop up in domestic travel as well, for better or worse.

I microwave any RFID they dare to put in my papers. So should you.

"oh? no workee? I have a magnetic personality. Electronics just fail around my person."

Comment: It's sort of like Rule 34. (Score 1) 374

by mgbastard (#36091762) Attached to: Cellphones Get Government Chips For Disaster Alert

What's the next hottest crack target? THIS. Obviously it will be owned, and abused for spam.

Either that, or it will be owned by a ~11yo and everyone, everywhere will get "an urgent message form the president" which is actually a picture of his thing. * or hers; equality.

Is there a rule # for this? Surely there is? If it has eyeballs, it will be spammed, or porned.

And somewhere is Rule #1337: If you build it big enough, it will be cracked in an inversely related fractional amount of time it took to 'perfect'.

Comment: Re:Educational standards (Score 3, Insightful) 741

by mgbastard (#35778664) Attached to: Could You Pass Harvard's Entrance Exam From 1869?

The sad lack in modern education is history. One reason our modern politics is so thoroughly screwed up is that a high quality understanding of history has been lost to the general population for a century.

I was looking hard to see if anyone had a glimpse of why greek and latin are important to education. You almost nailed it.

We've lost the art of teaching of how to think. The gentlemanly Greek and Latin were taught towards skills in reading texts, not in conversing to Joe Greek on the street about how he feels today; the pupil is then empowered to read many great and early works documenting the foundation and thought, and its progression, that form the fundamentals of our knowledge in philosophy, government, sciences and mathematics. Reading the literature of the time in the original source language conveys the subtext much more fluidly, thus enabling full comprehension. Individual languages are colored by the culture speaking it: Much is lost in translation. If you are to understand how to think, and achieve parity with where we have already tread in thought, then you need to understand first-hand how we arrived at the present knowledge, complete with the traps and tangents, not just the right answer. You learn how temporary some right answers are, giving you the humility and perspective to grow beyond the works of mankind thus far.

Comment: Re:I agree.. less math (Score 2) 583

by mgbastard (#35465236) Attached to: CS Profs Debate Role of Math In CS Education

I would submit the math requirements are common in the core requirements of any Bachelor of Sciences degree, rather than specific to a Computer Science major.

If you don't want to master basic college-level math to earn a sciences degree, then perhaps you should be lobbying academics to offer a Bachelor of Arts with a Applications Development major instead.

Comment: Re:Timothy... (Score 1) 225

by mgbastard (#35058716) Attached to: Ski Lifts Can Could Help Get Cargo Traffic Off the Road
Gladly took those troll points to point out how extremely stupid the subject matter is: truly a troll technology. Plus all the horrors of grammar mistakes in the bits of the post Timothy is responsible for: " Ski Lifts Can Could Help Get Cargo Traffic Off the Road "... except instead of excerpt.

With your bare hands?!?

Working...