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Cellphones

Does Lack of FM Support On Phones Increase Your Chances of Dying In a Disaster? 57

Posted by timothy
from the well-if-you-put-it-that-way dept.
theodp writes You may not know it," reports NPR's Emma Bowman, "but most of today's smartphones have FM radios inside of them. But the FM chip is not activated on two-thirds of devices. That's because mobile makers have the FM capability switched off. The National Association of Broadcasters has been asking mobile makers to change this. But the mobile industry, which profits from selling data to smartphone users, says that with the consumer's move toward mobile streaming apps, the demand for radio simply isn't there." But FEMA Administrator Craig Fugate says radio-enabled smartphones could sure come in handy during times of emergency. So, is it irresponsible not to activate the FM chips? And should it's-the-app-way-or-the-highway Apple follow Microsoft's lead and make no-static-at-all FM available on iPhones?

+ - Is iPhone's Lack of FM Support Increasing Your Chances of Dying in a Disaster?

Submitted by theodp
theodp (442580) writes ""You may not know it," reports NPR's Emma Bowman, "but most of today's smartphones have FM radios inside of them. But the FM chip is not activated on two-thirds of devices. That's because mobile makers have the FM capability switched off. The National Association of Broadcasters has been asking mobile makers to change this. But the mobile industry, which profits from selling data to smartphone users, says that with the consumer's move toward mobile streaming apps, the demand for radio simply isn't there." But FEMA Administrator Craig Fugate says radio-enabled smartphones could sure come in handy during times of emergency. So, is it irresponsible not to activate the FM chips? And should it's-the-app-way-or-the-highway Apple follow Microsoft's lead and make no-static-at-all FM available on iPhones?"

Comment: Re:Why it is hard to recruit... (Score 1) 33

by Cyberdyne (#49503895) Attached to: US Military To Recruit Civilian Cybersecurity Experts

They don't need script kiddies, they need social engineers. Question number one in the job interview should be "Is your native language Russian, Chinese, Farsi, Korean or Arabic?"

No, that's the beauty of global outsourcing: all they need's a Hindu accent. "Hello, I am being Sanj - I mean, Bob, from IT. I am needing you to be visiting TeamViewer to be fixing the Windows errors on your terrorist cell's PC..."

More seriously, I thought the offensive hacking was more an NSA/CIA operation: Army cybersecurity would be all about keeping the Windows systems patched and stopping generals replying to hot students who want naked sexy time over Skype in exchange for their passwords. (OK, it turned out that one should have been a CIA job too lately...) There's only a passing reference in TFA to the US having offensive capabilities, everything else is about securing DoD and contractor networks from attack, as I'd expect.

Comment: Re:Question still remains (Score 1) 106

by drinkypoo (#49503869) Attached to: Google Adds Handwriting Input To Android

By 2001 or 2002, they cost $5, shipped direct from Sprint.

By 2001, Handspring was making its last Visor, and Sprint was dumping the modules in a vain attempt to attract the last three or four Visor users to their network, and get something for their investment. The Visor never really took off. But if anyone is interested, I have the second or third OmniRemote module made for it, with a blue LED flashlight in. I got it straight from the maker. I think I also still have a cradle around here. Actually, I think I found my last working [translucent blue, basic] Visor as well. I'm in the midst of recycling all my useless electronics right now, so I've been finding stuff. I have a GRiDPad 2390 with power problems, too. I always meant to get the OS off of it so I could freshly load it onto my GRiDPad 1910, also available. It's got a full-size XT keyboard port hacked in... You might say I am familiar with the devices of the era — except the Newtons, which I admired but could not afford at the time, not the good examples anyway. The low-end ones were poop.

Comment: Re:rule of law (Score 1) 179

Research requires you to be able to buy a copy and read it, so you may use the information held in it. That's the case with lots of works out there, such as all scientific research publications. They all fall under copyright, which doesn't seem to hinder research all too much.

That's the point, right? If you're not allowed to publish because copyright, then that will hinder the next person's research.

I bet the human brain is a kludge. -- Marvin Minsky

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