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Comment: Blast to the past: Dmitry Skylarov (Score 4, Informative) 78

by metallic (#37586766) Attached to: Russian Software Company Says Its App Can Crack BlackBerry Security

Let's try not posting this as an Anonymous Coward by mistake.

This is the same company that employed Dmitry Skylarov, one of the first people to be arrested under the DMCA for breaking the encryption on Adobe's eBook format.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dmitry_Sklyarov

Comment: We're planning on moving away from OS X Server (Score 1) 341

by metallic (#36873260) Attached to: Why IT Won't Like Mac OS X Lion Server

The writing was on the wall as soon as Apple announced that the Xserve line was going away and nothing would be replacing it as a rackmount option. The sad thing is that everything works remarkably well together (we've had 6 servers attached to 6TB of storage using Xsan for years now with no problems) but it's simply no longer a supported solution. And Apple's suggestion to replace the servers with Mac Pros or Mac Minis is simply ridiculous for a handful of reasons. In the mean time, we're looking at hardware from IBM and Oracle and weighing our options.

Comment: Re:F-22 (Score 1) 304

by metallic (#27627429) Attached to: Predator C Avenger Makes First Flights

You also forget that the F-15 airframe is 30 years old. Most airframes in service are 25-30 years old, and it wasn't that long ago that we had one simply disintegrate in mid-air. This necessitated grounding our entire F-15 fleet, with the embarrassing result of the United States having to rely on our Canadian friends to assist in our air defense.

You are right that the F-15 is a very capable aircraft with the best combat record of any American fighter. But right now, we have two options: we can either revive production of the F-15 to replace our aging airframes, or we can field a new aircraft that will be technologically ahead of the curve for another 30 years.

Comment: Re:Question: What is a human? (Score 1) 422

by metallic (#27621707) Attached to: Louisiana Rep. Preps State Bill Banning Human-Animal Hybrids

Well, you're making the mistake of thinking that Louisiana is a homogeneous state. It may be true that the majority of the population of Louisiana is Protestant, this really only holds true in the northern and central part of the state. South Louisiana, which gave birth to Mardi Gras, always has and will probably always be majority Catholic.

By the time you reach North Louisiana, that influence has diminished significantly and you'll find that the majority population is now Protestant. It's just that when people think of Louisiana, they think of New Orleans and not much else.

Comment: Re:Import Library of Congress to Evergreen or Koha (Score 1) 152

by metallic (#25754105) Attached to: Non-Profit Org Claims Rights In Library Catalog Data

Well, the problem is whether or not the Library of Congress has a record for what you are cataloging. For example, my institution's library consists of a large number of rare books that do not appear in the LoC database. I'm sure there are plenty of other organizations in the same boat as us, which is how OCLC stays in business.

Security

+ - Domains May Disappear After Search 1

Submitted by
Ponca City, We Love You
Ponca City, We Love You writes "A perfect domain name pops into your mind, a quick check at your registrar reveals that the domain is available, you put off the registration a few minutes and when you come back to register the domain, it's taken by someone else. How much time has elapsed between the search and the attempted registration — in one case, less than 90 seconds. Daily Domainer has an interesting story alleging that there may be a leak that allows domain tasters to intercept, analyze and register your domain ideas in minutes. "Every time you do a whois search with any service, you run a risk of losing your domain," says one industry insider. ICANN's Security and Stability Advisory Committee (SSAC ) has not been able to find hard evidence of Domain Name Front Running but they have issued an advisory (pdf) for people to come forward with hard evidence it is happening. Here is how domain name research theft crimes can occur and some tips to avoiding being a victim."
Censorship

+ - Wikipedia COO was Convicted Felon-> 4

Submitted by
An anonymous reader writes "From the Register:

"For more than six months, beginning in January of this year, Wikipedia's million-dollar check book was balanced by a convicted felon. When Carolyn Bothwell Doran was hired as the Chief Operating Officer (COO) of the Florida-based Wikimedia Foundation, she had a criminal record in three other states — Virginia, Maryland, and Texas — and she was still on parole for a DUI (driving under the influence of alcohol) hit and run that resulted in a fatality. Her record also included convictions for passing bad checks, theft, petty larceny, additional DUIs, and unlawfully wounding her boyfriend with a gun shot to the chest.""

Link to Original Source
Government

+ - Guantanamo deleted detainee IDs from Wikipedia-> 1

Submitted by James Hardine
James Hardine (1150665) writes "The New York Times and The Inquirer are reporting that Wikileaks, the transparency group that published two manuals leaked from the US military prison at Guantanamo Bay in Cuba earlier this month has now caught US armed forces personnel there conducting propaganda attacks over the Internet. The activities uncovered by Wikileaks include deleting Guantanamo detainees' ID numbers from Wikipedia, posting of self-praising comments on news websites in response to negative articles, promoting pro-Guantanamo stories on the Internet news focus website Digg, and even altering Wikipedia's entry on Cuban President Fidel Castro to describe him as "an admitted transexual". Guantanamo spokesman Lt. Col. Bush blasted Wikileaks for identifying one "mass communications officer" by name, who has since received death threats for "simply doing his job — posting positive comments on the Internet about Gitmo". In response Wikileaks has posted independent confirmation of their analysis by security expert Bruce Schneier."
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The Internet

+ - Is It Time for a "Kinder, Gentler HTML"? -> 2

Submitted by jg21
jg21 (677801) writes "Web 2.0 Journal brings to our attention Yahoo! Architect and JSON inventor Douglas Crockford's latest ideas to fix HTML. Not a fan of HTML 5, which is still just an Editor's Draft and not endorsed by W3C yet, Crock puts forward ten ideas that in his view would provide extensibility without complexity, adding that the simplification of HTML he is proposing would reduce the cost of training of web developers and incorporates the best practices of AJAX development. [From the article: "The problems with HTML will not be solved by making it bigger and more complicated. I think instead we should generalize what it does well, while excising features that are problematic. HTML can be made into a general application delivery format without disrupting its original role as a document format."]"
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Google

+ - Google Sued By Professor Over DB Architecture->

Submitted by
eldavojohn
eldavojohn writes "Google is recently under fire from a Northeastern Professor who has filed suit against the search giant for their use of what he claims is his intellectual property. The patent being disputed is a method to retrieve data from a database in a faster manner. Baclawski and Jarg Corp have a few patents pending and assigned to them. While there may be a number of patents possibly infringed by Google, the most likely candidate's abstract reads, "A distributed computer database system connected to a network, e.g., the Internet or on an intranet, indexes interests of agents that have registered with the system, examines information objects, for example, that reside on the network, and, responsive to a match with the registered agents' interests, specifies to the agents the relevant information objects." For those of you familiar with Google's server farms, their modified Linux kernel & their anticipated contributions to the MySQL source, this sounds very familiar to how their run their grand caching scheme to make their search engine so fast and beat out the competition. Might other search engines face this patent lawsuit by default? What other method is there to distributing your search across databases aside from using massive server farms with 'intelligent' agents on each machine swarming over data?"
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