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Comment: This is good - think OS X Gatekeeper (Score 2) 190

by mccalli (#49527595) Attached to: Microsoft Announces Device Guard For Windows 10
This sounds a lot like Gatekeeper on the Mac, which works really well. It allows the user several levels of trust - "trust store apps only", "trust store apps plus recognised developers" (certificate signed), "allow everything".

I have mine set to "store apps plus recognised developers" and ask for the rest. If I run something else, I can right click and select Open..., it asks me if I'm sure and I say yes. This is a five second operation which gives me control over my options, whilst preventing unknown apps from running without my knowledge and explicit say so. This Windows one sounds pretty much the same, with the addition of your classic enterprise lock down features - it it's a corporately-owned machine, then yes the corporate should get say over what's running on it.

Imagine the kind of download-happy, click-on-everything user that we've all seen around. They would download cunningly-disguised-malware.exe and try to run it, and the OS would simply prevent them. Now true if they had admin rights they could go into preferences, set to allow everything etc. but it's all more effort and a quick realisation that something's unusual here.

Nope, I regard this as a good move. It already exists in OS X and works well - putting a similar system into Windows seems like a good idea to me.

Comment: Unsurprisingly, no one bothered to read (Score 1) 356

by wiredog (#49519689) Attached to: 'Mobilegeddon': Google To Punish Mobile-Hostile Sites Starting Today

The original google post about this, which makes it clear that mobile friendly sites get a higher ranking when you search on mobile devices . This change will affect mobile searches. Mobile. Not desktop. So if you're searching from a mobile device then results that are more mobile friendly will be ranked higher, on the assumption that people searching from mobile devices would prefer mobile content.

Comment: Re:I guess he crossed the wrong people (Score 1) 320

by Waffle Iron (#49500163) Attached to: Columbia University Doctors Ask For Dr. Mehmet Oz's Dismissal

Your use of microbes in your argument is ironic since farmers are also a huge part of the problem of driving bacterial evolution for resistance through misuse of antibiotics.

Antivirals, antibiotics and pesticides should be used in the minimal amounts exactly where most needed. They should not be routinely used everywhere indiscriminately. That's the mode that these GMO crops are encouraging.

Comment: Re:I guess he crossed the wrong people (Score 5, Insightful) 320

by Waffle Iron (#49498273) Attached to: Columbia University Doctors Ask For Dr. Mehmet Oz's Dismissal

Making a plant manufacture its own insecticide is one thing. Modifying it so that it can withstand being soaked with ever-increasing quantities and varieties of synthetic pesticides is another.

Weeds are gradually evolving to resist this chemical onslaught. Most people would rather not have themselves subjected to such evolutionary pressure within their lifetimes.

The weeds are destined to eventually win this arms race anyway, so this huge experiment in chemical exposure to the US population is eventually going to be for naught.

Comment: Re: Andrew "bunnie" Huang argues that Moore's Law (Score 1) 101

by Waffle Iron (#49477929) Attached to: Fifty Years of Moore's Law

All the plastic helps with the incremental increments in fuel economy: approximately 2X better over the past 57 years. I also neglected to mention safety, which has improved a good deal more than fuel economy. That's all OK, but it's nothing like the dramatic changes that happened previous to the 707. After nearly six decades, today's planes still look very similar to a 707, are about the same size, and go the same speed.

Comment: Re: Andrew "bunnie" Huang argues that Moore's Law (Score 4, Insightful) 101

by Waffle Iron (#49474573) Attached to: Fifty Years of Moore's Law

I think we've been hearing about the end of Moore's law for the last 15 years... inevitably, some process improvement comes along and it all keeps on going.

I don't think that it's necessarily "inevitable". Take aviation, for example. There was arguably exponential increases in the capability of aircraft for 55 years from 1903 to 1958, when the Boeing 707 was introduced. Ever since, further progress on economically viable aircraft has been pretty much limited to incremental increases in fuel economy and marketing strategies to keep costs down by keeping planes full.

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