Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Slashdot videos: Now with more Slashdot!

  • View

  • Discuss

  • Share

We've improved Slashdot's video section; now you can view our video interviews, product close-ups and site visits with all the usual Slashdot options to comment, share, etc. No more walled garden! It's a work in progress -- we hope you'll check it out (Learn more about the recent updates).

×

Comment: Re:masdf (Score 3, Insightful) 297

by mellon (#49452367) Attached to: Would-Be Bomber Arrested In Kansas; Planned Suicide Attack on Ft. Riley

Terrorists are interested in instigating terror. If they were as big a danger as they are said to be, they would already have let off a bomb in an airport security line and killed a hundred people waiting to be screened. The fact that this hasn't happened either means that the government has a machine that watches our every move and knows who is going to set off bombs, in which case they don't need these stings, or else it means that there really aren't that many people who are interested in committing mass murder who are able to get into the United States and act on that wish.

Comment: Re:masdf (Score 5, Insightful) 297

by mellon (#49452355) Attached to: Would-Be Bomber Arrested In Kansas; Planned Suicide Attack on Ft. Riley

17.3.

Dumb question. The job of the FBI is to arrest people who commit crimes. They should arrest exactly those people, and no other people. Of course it's an imperfect science, and they will miss some criminals and arrest some innocent people. But a key demographic they should avoid is arresting people who wouldn't have committed crimes without their help, because it is explicitly not their job to instigate criminal activity.

Comment: Re: Debunking a myth (Score 2, Insightful) 297

by mellon (#49452351) Attached to: Would-Be Bomber Arrested In Kansas; Planned Suicide Attack on Ft. Riley

Christianity forbids warfare outright (Aquinas notwithstanding), and yet look at all the wars that have been fought in the name of Jesus, and all the "christian nations" that have fought wars for supposedly just causes. If you're going to lay terrorism at the feet of Islam, at least get the rest of the story straight.

Comment: This doesn't match my experience. (Score 2) 179

by mellon (#49450997) Attached to: Google Lollipop Bricking Nexus 5 and Nexus 7 Devices

5.0.1 totally killed the battery in my Nexus 5, but I replaced it (thanks, Amazon for the battery and iFixit for the spudgers) and stuck with 4.4.4 until 5.1 came out. I'm running 5.1 now with no issues. I'm not saying that there are no problems, but this is probably a configuration-dependent issue, so a factory reset ought to fix it.

Comment: Re:Reason: for corporations, by corporations (Score 2) 489

by mellon (#49443513) Attached to: Reason: How To Break the Internet (in a Bad Way)

It's not clear to me that Americans are being offered these jobs. The problem is that Americans have legal rights, including minimum wage, so if you give an American a job you were paying an illegal alien (how can a person be illegal, anyway, but I digress) to do, and you try to pay them what you were paying the illegal person, they will be in a position of power over you, whereas the illegal person would have no power.

So if you want the kind of parity you are asking for, the cure is to get rid of the idea of "illegal" workers. If someone is present, they can work.

Comment: Re:Reason: for corporations, by corporations (Score 4, Insightful) 489

by mellon (#49441405) Attached to: Reason: How To Break the Internet (in a Bad Way)

"The lazy" sinking to the bottom is a commonly-held belief, but in fact being at the bottom is a lot more work than being at the top. It's not because people are "lazy" that they remain at the bottom. It's because most of the value their work produces is taken as profit by their employers, and they are paid the absolute minimum that their employers can get away with. If they were getting a decent cut of the value they create, they wouldn't be poor. That's not to say that there aren't lazy people at the bottom living corruptly, but the claim that if you are at the bottom, you are lazy, is a fallacy.

Comment: Re:USPTO IS a branch of government (Score 1) 71

by mellon (#49412005) Attached to: USPTO Demands EFF Censor Its Comments On Patentable Subject Matter

Yeah, I think what the EFF wants to say is something that needs to be said, and personally I don't care how they say it, but the PTO is part of the government, and they have processes that they follow. I'm not saying they are morally right, just that they are technically right.

Comment: Re:USPTO IS a branch of government (Score 5, Interesting) 71

by mellon (#49411373) Attached to: USPTO Demands EFF Censor Its Comments On Patentable Subject Matter

I'm not a big fan of the USPTO, but I'm not convinced that they are out of line here. The EFF comment makes mention of a specific patent applicant who is known to be highly litigious, and specifically argues that the USPTO should be particularly skeptical of applications from that entity because of the enormous cost to others of patents being inappropriately granted to that specific entity.

This is an entirely reasonable thing to say, but the PTO's point is that it's not an appropriate thing to say in the context of a request for comments on something else. The request for comments was on a new set of guidelines the PTO had issued, not on a patent application from the entity to which the EFF referred.

If you don't have time to do it right, where are you going to find the time to do it over?

Working...