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Comment: para 26 seems to be the key (Score 3, Informative) 439

by megabunny (#33903424) Attached to: FCC Approves Changes To Cable Box Rules
26. We conclude that the best means of assuring the development of a retail market for navigation devices is to require cable operators to allow subscribers to self-install CableCARDs. We believe cable operators should have time to train staff and develop more robust customer support infrastructures and procedures, and provide nine months to comply for any operators that allow subscribers on any of their systems to self-install any cable modems89 or leased set-top boxes.90 We are not persuaded by arguments that cable operators could not support activation of retail CableCARD devices within this reasonable transition period. However, we are concerned that a cable operator that does not permit self-installation of any equipment that attaches to its network may not have the customer support infrastructures in place to handle self-installations and may need a longer transition period.91 Therefore, we will allow cable operators that do not have any self-installation support in place twelve months to phase in this self-installation requirement.92 We also require cable operators to inform their subscribers about the self-installation option when they request CableCARDs.93

Comment: Re:Knee jerk (Score 4, Interesting) 493

by megabunny (#30015308) Attached to: Did Microsoft Borrow GPL Code For a Windows 7 Utility?

The new example is much clearer. Basic structure follows well. All the magic numbers in the code that I looked at matched too, and there are quite a few. Looks like it was massaged at least a bit, probably just to fit in with the local code environment not to obscure it.

But ...
The article points out only two weaknesses in this code borrowing. MS did not feed back any (unknown at this point) enhancements to the source. And they did not offer the source under the right license.

It is a real but very minor issue. If it wasn't MS it would not even be interesting.

MB

Comment: so what might be the kill rate (Score 1) 368

by megabunny (#28303881) Attached to: WHO Declares H1N1's Spread Officially a Pandemic
Working from the BBC report at
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/8021547.stm
Canada reports 2 deaths in 1530 cases giving a raw rate of 0.1%.
Mexico reports 97 deaths in 5029 cases giving a raw rate of 1.9%.
The US reports 17 deaths in 8975 cases giving a raw rate of 0.2%.
The world totals are 117 deaths in 19,315 cases giving a raw rate of 0.6%.
Now, I know the infection rate is institutionally, and systematically under reported in Canada. That means the Canadian death rate is like an upper bound. Assuming ten percent of the world's 6.8 billion inhabitants are infected, then under 680 thousand to 13 million people will die from this. On the Canadian data, I put it at under half a million if the virus does not become more deadly next fall.
MB

Comment: Re:If I wanted to see ads... (Score 1) 615

by megabunny (#27918511) Attached to: Adblock Plus Maker Proposes Change To Help Sites

Nice.

If you want a new feature that might really fly, how about this:
ABP gains a setting for each type of ad it can technically distinguish ( text, flash, whatever ) and the user can set it to the maximum number of that type allowed on each page. Defaults of zero get the current behavior.

The webmasters get to add a tag on each type of ad listing the priority order for showing them. If the user says OK, two text ads, then the webmaster gets to say which two are shown.

Neither thing is particularly difficult. Neither one leaves a huge door open for abuse.

MB

Space

First Image of a Planet Orbiting a Sun-Like Star 131

Posted by kdawson
from the cold-jupiter dept.
Several readers including houbou and DigitumDei sent links to what may be the first-ever image of a planet orbiting a sun-like star (research paper). The giant planet, the mass of 8 Jupiters, orbits its star at 330 AU, or 11 times the distance to Neptune's orbit. If the imaged object does turn out to be a planet — and it's not certain it is — then theories of planet formation may have to be adjusted. "The bulk of the material from which planets might form is significantly closer to the parent star... The outermost parts of such disks wouldn't contain enough material to assemble a Jupiter-mass planet at the distance from the star... at which the Toronto team found the faint object."

As far as we know, our computer has never had an undetected error. -- Weisert

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