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Submission + - HIV vaccine makers predict eradication of AIDS after successful trials (

An anonymous reader writes: The Phase 1 clinical trial of the SAV001-H HIV vaccine has shown great promise. Sumagen Canada Inc and the University of Western Ontario have reported that the trial is now complete, with volunteers showing no adverse effect from their course of SAV001-H and recording boosts in the production of antibodies. The increase of antibodies is seen as especially encouraging as a predicate for the likely success of Phase 2, which will focus on immune response. Sumagen CEO Mr Jung-Gee Cho expects the progress will see the company be the first to hit the market with an HIV vaccine, and predicts they will, in time, eradicate HIV/AIDS altogethe

Submission + - Valve Continues Recruiting Top Linux Talent (

An anonymous reader writes: Valve Software in their Linux Steam / Source Engine effort, plus the rumored Steam Box, is continuing to hire top Linux developers. So far they have poached the lead developers of the DarkPlaces open-source engine used by Nexuiz/Xonotic, the founder of Battle for Wesnoth, and just yesterday they hired the creator of SDL. According to Michael Larabel, they are still trying to hire more Linux kernel developers, driver experts, and other "extremely talented Linux developers."

Submission + - Justice Dept., FBI to review use of forensic evidence in thousands of cases (

NotSanguine writes: From The Washington Post Article:

The Justice Department and the FBI have launched a review of thousands of criminal cases to determine whether any defendants were wrongly convicted or deserve a new trial because of flawed forensic evidence, officials said Tuesday. The undertaking is the largest post-conviction review ever done by the FBI. It will include cases conducted by all FBI Laboratory hair and fiber examiners since at least 1985 and may reach earlier if records are available, people familiar with the process said. Such FBI examinations have taken place in federal and local cases across the country, often in violent crimes, such as rape, murder and robbery.


Submission + - Can 50-core Xeon Phi's x86 Architecture Best Nvidia's Massive GPUs? (

An anonymous reader writes: Nvidia's massively parallel GPUs are being harnessed by an increasing number of supercomputer makers to boost their performance, but at the cost of using a proprietary instruction set that was not designed for general-purpose computing. Now that Intel is releasing its own x86-based massively parallel processor--the Xeon Phi--the supercomputer community will have a choice to make: use Intel's x86 parallel processing tools to create their supercomputer applications or rewrite their applications to make use of Nvidia's GPU's and proprietary instructions. The verdict won't be in on which is best for several years, but I'm hoping to stimulate the programming community to start debating the pros and cons now, so that by the time Intel starts shipping its 50-core Xeon Phi this fall we can have enough data points to make an informed decision. What's your take on Intel's versus Nvidia's approach to supercomputing?

Submission + - The state of Chrome OS (

MrSeb writes: "Google's web-tethered, sandboxed, Linux-based Chrome OS has now been available for a year. When it originally launched many naysayers claimed it would not be robust enough, and that the breadth of web applications was too slim to really make a splash in the PC pond. ExtremeTech's Jason Kennedy has been using his Cr-48 Chromebook since it first arrived in December 2010, and judging by his experiences, as long as you don't use CAD or non-linear video editing tools, the current state of Chrome OS seems to be very rosy indeed."

Submission + - Divorce destroys Star Trek dream home guy took 10 ( 1

xtekpartners writes: ""A man who took 10 years to create his own personal man-cave—in this instance, an awesome Star Trek starship interior replica that would make every Trek geek weep—has to tear it all down because his wife is divorcing him."

"When his wife left him in 1994, he undertook the massive task of transforming his Leicester, U.K., apartment into the interior of a Starfleet starship (that's what every Trek fan on the planet would do, right?)—in his case, the USS Voyager was his inspiration."

As an avid Star Trek fan (but not a die hard Trekkie), my heart weeps."


Submission + - College Discovers 12-Year-Old Virus Infection (

itwbennett writes: "The City College of San Francisco discovered a virus just after Thanksgiving that leads back through at least seven variants to an original infection in 1999. In the dozen years since, the virus may have pilfered the personal banking and financial data of 100,000 students and staff. 'We looked in the system and discovered these things were all over the place,' John Rizzo, president of the college's Board of Trustees, told the AP. Apparently to blame is a school culture that requires students to access porn sites to complete homework assignments while also not requiring anyone to change passwords."

Submission + - Comet Armageddon Detected in Nearby Star System (

astroengine writes: "A nearby star system is currently going through hell, as hinted at by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. Through its infrared eye, Spitzer has detected the dusty remains of comet impacts around the star Eta Corvi — reminding us what it must have been like during the early evolution of our own solar system during the Late Heavy Bombardment. Interestingly, the star is known to have an outer cool ring of dust that may reveal its very own Kuiper Belt — a possible origin for the comets currently pummeling the inner system of hidden worlds."

Feed Ars Technica: Italian Wikipedia replaces every page with free speech protest (

On Tuesday, Wikipedia took the drastic step of replacing every Italian-language page with a statement warning that a law now under consideration by the Italian parliament could force the shutdown of the Italian edition of Wikipedia. In the English version of its statement, Wikipedia says the law includes "a requirement to all websites to publish, within 48 hours of the request and without any comment, a correction of any content that the applicant deems detrimental to his/her image." Wikipedia says this requirement is "an unacceptable restriction of the freedom and independence of Wikipedia," and would paralyze Wikipedia's bottom-up editing process.

Italian prime minister Silvio Berlusconi is currently on trial for corruption and having sex with an underage prostitute. His government is trying to restrict publication of police wiretapping transcripts after Berlusconi was embarrassed by leaked transcripts of his own phone calls.

One of those transcripts show him expressing contempt for his country and a desire to leave it. In another, he directed a "crude insult" at German leader Angela Merkel. In a third, he boasted, of "'doing eight girls" in a night and joked that with all his sexual activity, he was only prime minister 'in [his] spare time.'"

Berlusconi's government insists the law would safeguard the privacy of all Italians.

Section 29 of the proposed legislation would force websites to post any corrections submitted to them. There's no provision for verifying the accuracy of the corrections, nor is there a process of judicial review.

Italian Wikipedia editors argue that they "have always been available to reviewand modify, if neededany content deemed to be detrimental to anyone, without harm to the project's neutrality and independence." And they argue that existing defamation law already gives adequate protections for Italians who are unfairly maligned by a website.

Italian-language articles are now available again, but a banner opposing the legislation continues to appear on the Italian Wikipedia home page. The protest statement was viewed 16 million times in the two days it was up.

Wikipedia says the Italian site is its fourth-largest, with more than over 800,000 articles and over 600,000 registered users.

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Submission + - More trouble at Fukushima (

curious.corn writes: Molten rods have apparently made contact with underground water causing a hydrovolcano.

Lizard hit by ejecta mutated and is now ravaging Tokyo suburbs... GODZILLA!!

Err... ok, sorry for the crap joke. Anyway more shit happening...


Submission + - Battling Bad Science (

Spafticus writes: "Every day there are news reports of new health advice, but how can you know if they're right? Doctor and epidemiologist Ben Goldacre shows us, at high speed, the ways evidence can be distorted, from the blindingly obvious nutrition claims to the very subtle tricks of the pharmaceutical industry"

Submission + - Speed-of-light exceeded? (

biomass writes: Puzzling results from Cern, home of the LHC, have confounded physicists — because it appears subatomic particles have exceeded the speed of light.

Submission + - LHC May Have Broken the Speed of Light (

trum4n writes: "The boys over at CERN got quite a surprise when their neutrinos got to their destination a few pico-seconds early, because they realized, that if accurate, this test indicated that the particles broke the speed of light. The test was repeated >15,000 times, over a distance of 732km. They are asking everyone who can to prove them wrong or, perhaps, prove them right to do so!"

Submission + - CERN measures FTL Neutrinos (

An anonymous reader writes: A spokesman for CERN [a href=""]told reporters[a] today that they have measured neutrinos moving faster than the speed of light, by nearly 60 ns over the 730 km trip from Geneva, Switzerland to Gran Sasso, Italy. The experiment was originally designed to measure and characterize neutrino oscillations. This new finding could potentially explain not only neutrino oscillations, but help us understand what dark matter is and how it is formed.

"Survey says..." -- Richard Dawson, weenie, on "Family Feud"