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Submission + - Kansas Secretary of State Blocks Release of Voting Machine Tapes->

PvtVoid writes: Wichita State University statistician Beth Clarkson has filed a lawsuit under Kansas' open records law to force the state to release paper tape records from voting machines, to be used as data in her research on statistical anomalies in voting patterns in the state.

Clarkson, a certified quality engineer with a Ph.D. in statistics, has analyzed election returns in Kansas and elsewhere over several elections that indicate “a statistically significant” pattern where the percentage of Republican votes increase the larger the size of the precinct. The pattern could be voter fraud or a demographic trend that has not been picked up by extensive polling. Secretary of State Kris Kobach argued that the records sought by Clarkson are not subject to the Kansas open records act, and that their disclosure is prohibited by Kansas statute.

Link to Original Source

Submission + - Government Warrantless Electronic Surveillance Rising

dkatana writes: License plate scanners mounted on garbage trucks, Dirtbox and Stingray "IMSI catchers", WiFi snooping, and now Jugular, PocketHound, and Wolfhound handheld cellphone tracking devices.. Government agencies are piling up the latest technologies to track cars, phones and individuals without judicial oversight.

In 1972, the US Supreme Court ruled in a the case: "The Fourth Amendment contemplates a prior judicial judgment, not the risk that executive discretion may be reasonably exercised."

What happened after that?

Comment Interesting, but I'd rather just buy overlays (Score 2) 76

Honestly, the part that I dig the most is the tactile overlays. Interesting concept, but too limited for me for the price. That being said, I'd buy the heck out of a $15/$20 overlay that gives you the tactile sensation, but using my Tablet of Choice as a controller. I've seen them for keyboard replacements for the ipad; unsure what else is out there.

Businesses

Trillion-Dollar World Trade Deal Aims To Make IT Products Cheaper 97

itwbennett writes: A new (tentative) global trade agreement, struck on Friday at a World Trade Organization meeting in Geneva, eliminates tariffs on more than 200 kinds of IT products, ranging from smartphones, routers, and ink cartridges to video game consoles and telecommunications satellites. A full list of products covered was published by the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative, which called the ITA expansion 'great news for the American workers and businesses that design, manufacture, and export state-of-the-art technology and information products, ranging from MRI machines to semiconductors to video game consoles.' The deal covers $1.3 trillion worth of global trade, about 7 percent of total trade today. The deal has approval from 49 countries, and is waiting on just a handful more before it becomes official,

Submission + - 22 Years Later an Update Arrives!->

An anonymous reader writes: After 22 year, the Apple IIGS finally gets an update to its operating system GS/OS. Apparently, leaked source code allowed the community to give a beloved retro machine a badly needed upgrade. Who needs Windows 10? We got GS/OS 6.0.2. Long live the Apple IIGS!
Link to Original Source

Submission + - Critical vulnerability in all windows versions allowing remote code execution->

QuantumReality writes: A remote code execution vulnerability exists in Microsoft Windows when the Windows Adobe Type Manager Library improperly handles specially crafted OpenType fonts. An attacker who successfully exploited this vulnerability could take complete control of the affected system. An attacker could then install programs; view, change, or delete data; or create new accounts with full user rights.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - Airbus first to Fly across English Channel, after dirty tricks delay rival. 1

wolfguru writes: Airbus claimed the technical coup of being the first to fly and electrically powered plane across the English Channel today, with great fanfare. Unfortunately for Airbus, even though they were able to get rival Pipistrel denied the opportunity earlier this week, by behind-the-scenes pressure on Siemans to de-certify the electric motors Pipistrel uses for flight over water, another electric plane was able to make the flight about 12 hours earlier. French pilot Hugues Duval took his two-engine, one-seat Cricri plane from Calais to Dover and back. Because he was denied authorization to take off from Calais, another fuel-driven plane towed his 100-kilogram (220-pound) Cricri for the start of the trip. He then flew back to Calais and landed safely.
So what does Airbus get to actually claim, other than to have duplicated the acheivement with more media in attendance?

Submission + - Little Girl Moves Her Arms for the First Time Thanks to 3D Printed 'Angel Arms'->

ErnieKey writes: Two Grand Valley State University students, named Joseph Kissling and Samuel Brooks, have helped a little girl move her arms for the first time, thanks to their 3D printed "Angle Arms" exoskeleton. Lylah, who suffers from a condition called Spinal Muscular Atrophy, is now able to play around with her toys, thanks to these two young men.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - Bruce Schneier says: "Encryption should be enabled for everything by default."->

snowder writes: This is important. If we only use encryption when we're working with important data, then encryption signals that data's importance. If only dissidents use encryption in a country, that country's authorities have an easy way of identifying them. But if everyone uses it all of the time, encryption ceases to be a signal. No one can distinguish simple chatting from deeply private conversation. The government can't tell the dissidents from the rest of the population. Every time you use encryption, you're protecting someone who needs to use it to stay alive.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - UK's Legalization of CD Ripping is Unlawful, Court Rules->

An anonymous reader writes: Several music industry organizations in the UK have won a judicial review which renders the Government's decision to allow copying for personal use unlawful. According to the High Court, there's insufficient evidence to prove that the legislation doesn't hurt musicians and the industry at large.

Late last year the UK Government legalized copying for private use, a practice which many citizens already believed to be legal.

However, until last October, anyone who transferred music from a purchased CD to an MP3 player was committing an offense.

Link to Original Source

Submission + - Hot Topic Buys Geeknet->

jones_supa writes: The clothing and music retailer Hot Topic is buying Geeknet for $117.3 million. Geeknet, the firm behind the legendary establishments SourceForge and VA Linux, is currently the parent company for ThinkGeek and ThinkGeek Solutions. ThinkGeek sells clothing, toys, gadgets and other products mostly based on popular movies, television shows and brands with geek appeal. ThinkGeek Solutions is a distributor of video-game themed merchandise through licensed web stores. Hot Topic Inc. will pay $17.50 per Geeknet share. Privately held Hot Topic, based in Los Angeles, has more than 650 stores in the U.S. and Canada. Geeknet will become a Hot Topic subsidiary.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - European Internet Users Urged To Protect Themselves Against Facebook Tracking 1

An anonymous reader writes: In the wake of the revelations about Facebook's tracking of users who do not own a Facebook account, the Belgian Privacy Commission has issued a set of recommendations for both Facebook, website owners and end users. The recommendations are based on the results of an extensive analysis of Facebook’s revised policies and terms (rolled out on January 30, 2015) conducted by the inter-university research center EMSOC/SPION, which concluded that the company is acting in violation of European law. According to them Facebook places too much burden on its users to protect their privacy, and then doesn't offer simple tools and settings to do so, and sets up some problematic default settings. They also don't provide adequate information for users to make informed choices.
Bug

Groupon Refuses To Pay Security Expert Who Found Serious XSS Site Bugs 148

Mark Wilson writes: Bounty programs benefit everyone. Companies like Microsoft get help from security experts, customers gain improved security, and those who discover and report vulnerabilities reap the rewards financially. Or at least that's how things are supposed to work. Having reported a series of security problems to discount and deal site Groupon, security researcher Brute Logic from XSSposed.org was expecting a pay-out — but the site refuses to give up the cash. In all, Brute Logic reported more than 30 security issues with Groupon's site, but the company cites its Responsible Disclosure policy as the reason for not handing over the cash.

FORTUNE'S FUN FACTS TO KNOW AND TELL: #44 Zebras are colored with dark stripes on a light background.

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