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Submission + - Advertisers already using new iPhone text message exploit

Andy Smith writes: The annoying App Store redirect issue has blighted iPhone users for years, but now there's a new annoyance and it's already being exploited: Visit a web page on your iPhone and any advertiser can automatically open your messages app and create a new text message with the recipient and message already filled in. We can only hope they don't figure out how to automatically send the message, although you can bet they're trying.

Submission + - Breakthrough optical rectenna turns light directly into usable electricity (

Taffykay writes: A new breakthrough from Georgia Tech is likely to revolutionize the renewable energy industry. The optical rectenna is composed of tiny carbon nanotubes and rectifiers that capture light and convert it directly into DC current. The nanotubes create an oscillating charge that moves through the rectifier, switching on and off at high speeds, thereby creating a small electrical current. Billions of rectennas together can generate a more substantial current, resulting in renewable energy that is both significantly cheaper than conventional solar and more efficient.

Submission + - Can living in total darkness for 5 days "reset" the visual system? (

the_newsbeagle writes: That's what one neuroscientist is aiming to find out. He wants to put patients with a type of amblyopia, the vision problem commonly called lazy eye, into the dark for 5 days. His hypothesis: When they emerge, their brains' visual cortices will be temporarily "plastic" and changeable, and may begin to process the visual signals from their bad eyes correctly. Before he could do this study, though, he had to do a test run to figure out logistics. So he himself lived in a pitch black room for 5 days. One finding: Eating ravioli in the dark is hard.

Submission + - Kansas Secretary of State Blocks Release of Voting Machine Tapes (

PvtVoid writes: Wichita State University statistician Beth Clarkson has filed a lawsuit under Kansas' open records law to force the state to release paper tape records from voting machines, to be used as data in her research on statistical anomalies in voting patterns in the state.

Clarkson, a certified quality engineer with a Ph.D. in statistics, has analyzed election returns in Kansas and elsewhere over several elections that indicate “a statistically significant” pattern where the percentage of Republican votes increase the larger the size of the precinct. The pattern could be voter fraud or a demographic trend that has not been picked up by extensive polling. Secretary of State Kris Kobach argued that the records sought by Clarkson are not subject to the Kansas open records act, and that their disclosure is prohibited by Kansas statute.

Submission + - Government Warrantless Electronic Surveillance Rising

dkatana writes: License plate scanners mounted on garbage trucks, Dirtbox and Stingray "IMSI catchers", WiFi snooping, and now Jugular, PocketHound, and Wolfhound handheld cellphone tracking devices.. Government agencies are piling up the latest technologies to track cars, phones and individuals without judicial oversight.

In 1972, the US Supreme Court ruled in a the case: "The Fourth Amendment contemplates a prior judicial judgment, not the risk that executive discretion may be reasonably exercised."

What happened after that?

Comment Interesting, but I'd rather just buy overlays (Score 2) 76

Honestly, the part that I dig the most is the tactile overlays. Interesting concept, but too limited for me for the price. That being said, I'd buy the heck out of a $15/$20 overlay that gives you the tactile sensation, but using my Tablet of Choice as a controller. I've seen them for keyboard replacements for the ipad; unsure what else is out there.


Trillion-Dollar World Trade Deal Aims To Make IT Products Cheaper 97

itwbennett writes: A new (tentative) global trade agreement, struck on Friday at a World Trade Organization meeting in Geneva, eliminates tariffs on more than 200 kinds of IT products, ranging from smartphones, routers, and ink cartridges to video game consoles and telecommunications satellites. A full list of products covered was published by the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative, which called the ITA expansion 'great news for the American workers and businesses that design, manufacture, and export state-of-the-art technology and information products, ranging from MRI machines to semiconductors to video game consoles.' The deal covers $1.3 trillion worth of global trade, about 7 percent of total trade today. The deal has approval from 49 countries, and is waiting on just a handful more before it becomes official,

Submission + - 22 Years Later an Update Arrives! (

An anonymous reader writes: After 22 year, the Apple IIGS finally gets an update to its operating system GS/OS. Apparently, leaked source code allowed the community to give a beloved retro machine a badly needed upgrade. Who needs Windows 10? We got GS/OS 6.0.2. Long live the Apple IIGS!

Submission + - Critical vulnerability in all windows versions allowing remote code execution (

QuantumReality writes: A remote code execution vulnerability exists in Microsoft Windows when the Windows Adobe Type Manager Library improperly handles specially crafted OpenType fonts. An attacker who successfully exploited this vulnerability could take complete control of the affected system. An attacker could then install programs; view, change, or delete data; or create new accounts with full user rights.

Submission + - Airbus first to Fly across English Channel, after dirty tricks delay rival. 1

wolfguru writes: Airbus claimed the technical coup of being the first to fly and electrically powered plane across the English Channel today, with great fanfare. Unfortunately for Airbus, even though they were able to get rival Pipistrel denied the opportunity earlier this week, by behind-the-scenes pressure on Siemans to de-certify the electric motors Pipistrel uses for flight over water, another electric plane was able to make the flight about 12 hours earlier. French pilot Hugues Duval took his two-engine, one-seat Cricri plane from Calais to Dover and back. Because he was denied authorization to take off from Calais, another fuel-driven plane towed his 100-kilogram (220-pound) Cricri for the start of the trip. He then flew back to Calais and landed safely.
So what does Airbus get to actually claim, other than to have duplicated the acheivement with more media in attendance?

Submission + - Little Girl Moves Her Arms for the First Time Thanks to 3D Printed 'Angel Arms' (

ErnieKey writes: Two Grand Valley State University students, named Joseph Kissling and Samuel Brooks, have helped a little girl move her arms for the first time, thanks to their 3D printed "Angle Arms" exoskeleton. Lylah, who suffers from a condition called Spinal Muscular Atrophy, is now able to play around with her toys, thanks to these two young men.

Submission + - Bruce Schneier says: "Encryption should be enabled for everything by default." (

snowder writes: This is important. If we only use encryption when we're working with important data, then encryption signals that data's importance. If only dissidents use encryption in a country, that country's authorities have an easy way of identifying them. But if everyone uses it all of the time, encryption ceases to be a signal. No one can distinguish simple chatting from deeply private conversation. The government can't tell the dissidents from the rest of the population. Every time you use encryption, you're protecting someone who needs to use it to stay alive.

Submission + - UK's Legalization of CD Ripping is Unlawful, Court Rules (

An anonymous reader writes: Several music industry organizations in the UK have won a judicial review which renders the Government's decision to allow copying for personal use unlawful. According to the High Court, there's insufficient evidence to prove that the legislation doesn't hurt musicians and the industry at large.

Late last year the UK Government legalized copying for private use, a practice which many citizens already believed to be legal.

However, until last October, anyone who transferred music from a purchased CD to an MP3 player was committing an offense.

Submission + - Yes, androids do dream of electric sheep

hmckee writes: Thought this was a really interesting story from the Guardian: "Google sets up feedback loop in its image recognition neural network — which looks for patterns in pictures — creating hallucinatory images of animals, buildings and landscapes which veer from beautiful to terrifying"

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