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Submission + - AT&T Call Centers Sold Mobile Customer Information To Criminals (

itwbennett writes: Employees at three call centers in Mexico, Colombia and the Philippines sold hundreds of thousands of AT&T customer records, including names and Social Security numbers, to criminals who attempted to use the customer information to unlock stolen mobile phones, the U.S. Federal Communications Commission said. AT&T has agreed to pay a $25 million civil penalty, which is the largest related to a data breach and customer privacy in the FCC's history.

Comment Re:Regardless of longevity. (Score 1) 112

In regard to the Space Shuttle, I have said the same thing since they decided to retire the fleet. It seems the greatest cost of having things in space has always been getting them off the ground. There was no reason to bring the shuttles back once we knew they weren't going to be used again. I remember that, besides the Smithsonian, many institutions complained about how expensive it would be just for annual maintenance to keep a shuttle on display.

So, as you suggested, they should have moved it to a higher orbit and abandoned it. High above all the space junk it would not be a hazard to any satellites.

Comment Re:Public domain? (Score 1) 125

Yes, from the discussion of this I don't see how this is a copyright case.

Works of the United States government are not entitled to domestic copyright protection under U.S. law, sometimes referred to as "noncopyright."

relevant discussion of this

Comment Re:Gunna hate this BUT (Score 2) 254

I am also a Sharepoint server admin and I would never recommend it to anyone.

As has been said already, it has a lot of really good ideas, all executed terribly. Search is so important, yet Sharepoint is very bad it. Yes you can drag and drop a whole hierarchy of files to add them to sharepoint, but woe to you if one of those files has a name that Sharepoint does not like


Submission + - When Will HP Become An ARM Licensee? (

siliconbits writes: It's only a matter of time before HP cosies up with ARM and uses it, amongst other things, in servers.

Leo Apotheker, its CEO, has made it clear that it want to make HP as cool as Apple is and, we believe that the acquisition of WebOS last year was only the first step to that, giving to HP a proven platform good enough to take on iOS on mobile and desktops.
The other move that HP will take in order to have more control on its destiny would be to get a license from ARM to produce its own processors like Apple. Unlike the Cupertino-based company, HP has a very long history in designing and building top quality microprocessors (yes, including Itanium).


Submission + - Combo-Cracking Robot Makes (

TheRavenKing writes: "Cracking combination locks has never been so easy. A group of engineering students at Olin College of Engineering have built a robot that will solve any MasterLock combination in a under two hours by running through all the possible combinations. Just set it and forget it."

Submission + - Most New Phones in Europe Will Charge with USB

Hugh Pickens writes: "Dvice reports that as of next year, almost every new cellphone in Europe will have to be able to charge via micro-USB as the result of a voluntary plan agreed to by a whole host of cellphone manufacturers back in 2009, including most of the big names like Apple, Nokia, Qualcomm, RIM, LG, Motorola, and Samsung making more than 90% of the smartphones sold in the European Union. "Charger standardization is great for consumers, because we won't have to keep buying new chargers at ridiculous markups, and it's great for the environment, because we won't have to keep throwing those same chargers away whenever we get a new phone," writes Evan Ackerman. It's also worth noting that one of the first companies to agree to this standard was Apple, who has a history of making everything as proprietary as possible so maybe there will be a micro-USB on the iPhone 5."

Submission + - Sexism: Open Source Software's Dirty Little Secret (

jammag writes: "The number of women involved with free and open source software (FOSS) is appallingly low, notes Linux pundit Bruce Byfield — "over seventeen times lower than it is in proprietary software development," he posits. The reason: a casually accepted sexism about which the heavily male-centric FOSS culture is in deep denial. The constant trolls on the mailing lists for female developers, the horror stories told by female coders, the lack of management figures — it ain't pretty. Since FOSS is so idealistic in other ways, Byfield wonders, why is it so profoundly backward in this central issue?"

Use the Force, Luke.