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Researchers Discover Irresistible Dance Moves 215

Posted by samzenpus
from the gene-gene-the-dancing-machine dept.
sciencehabit writes "To find out if certain dance moves are more attractive to women than others, researchers recruited a bunch of college guys and used motion-capture to create avatars of them dancing. When women watched the avatars (2 videos included in story), the men they found most attractive were those who kept their heads and torsos moving without flailing their arms and legs. The researchers say dancing is thus an honest signal to women of the man's strength and health, just as it is in crabs and hummingbirds, who also move in special ways to attract mates."
The Internet

The Puzzle of Japanese Web Design 242

Posted by kdawson
from the how-to-pack-five-eggs dept.
I'm Not There (1956) writes "Jeffrey Zeldman brings up the interesting issue of the paradox between Japan's strong cultural preference for simplicity in design, contrasted with the complexity of Japanese websites. The post invites you to study several sites, each more crowded than the last. 'It is odd that in Japan, land of world-leading minimalism in the traditional arts and design, Web users and skilled Web design practitioners believe more is more.'"
Earth

Breaking the Squid Barrier 126

Posted by timothy
from the calimari-for-the-5000 dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Dr. Steve O'Shea of Auckland, New Zealand is attempting to break the record for keeping deep sea squid alive in captivity, with the goal of being able to raise a giant squid one day. Right now, he's raising the broad squid, sepioteuthis australis, from egg masses found in seaweed. This is a lot harder than it sounds, because the squid he's studying grow rapidly and eat only live prey, making it hard for them to keep the squid from becoming prey themselves. If his research works out, you might one day be able to visit an aquarium and see giant squid."
Transportation

+ - The traffic jam mystery finally solved 1

Submitted by
Roland Piquepaille
Roland Piquepaille writes "When you're caught in a traffic jam, you probably don't know why. Is there an accident ahead of you? In most of the cases, the answer is no. And all the electronic devices installed in your car can't help you. You're stuck for a while — until the traffic gradually improves. Now, European mathematicians have solved the traffic jam mystery. The mathematical model they've developed shows that traffic jams are mostly caused by a single driver who brakes too much when faced to an unexpected event. Of course, the driver behind him also slows down, and so does the next one, until the road is totally blocked. But read more for additional details and references."
Supercomputing

+ - The History of NTP (Network Time Protocol)->

Submitted by
UKDave
UKDave writes "Without NTP, time would not be consistent over any two computers, let alone a network of hundreds, or thousands. Seconds would be lost here and more seconds would be gained there. It would cause major confusion. This article takes a look at the history of NTP, right from the beginning at Delaware University."
Link to Original Source
Supercomputing

+ - IBM dominates first Green 500 supercomputer list

Submitted by Stony Stevenson
Stony Stevenson (954022) writes "Researchers at Virginia Tech have released the first Green 500 list which ranks the world's supercomputers by performance-per-watt rather than pure processing power. The list of the 500 most energy efficient supercomputers around the world is a derivative of the Top 500 list, a bi-annual report of the top performing supercomputer sites. This inaugural list uses the measured power consumed during a Linpack run, if submitted, or peak power consumption of the supercomputer otherwise. The top of the list is completely dominated by IBM's Blue Gene supercomputers, with 26 of the top 27 deployments."

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