Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:Excuse me (Score 1) 151

by matthewp (#27852951) Attached to: Microsoft Bans VoIP, Rival Stores At Mobile Market

Where are you getting this information? I've never seen a bill for an app update (even a $0 bill) and I've not seen any mention of this anywhere else.

Actually, Apple did send out $0 receipts for updates in the early days. I have a few that list for-pay apps as 'Free' because they're updates. But I haven't received one of those in quite some time, so it looks like they've stopped doing it.

Whether they counted those 'sales' towards their billion is another matter.

Businesses

Diskeeper Accused of Scientology Indoctrination 779

Posted by kdawson
from the is-that-perfectly-clear dept.
touretzky writes "Two ex-employees have sued Diskeeper Corporation in Los Angeles Superior Court after being fired, alleging that the company makes Scientology training a mandatory condition of employment (complaint, PDF). Diskeeper founder and CEO Craig Jensen is a high-level, publicly avowed Scientologist who has given millions to his Church. Diskeeper's surprising response to the lawsuit (PDF) appears to be that religious instruction in a place of employment is protected by the First Amendment." The blogger at RealityBasedCommunity.net believes that the legal mechanism that Diskeeper is using to advance this argument ("motion to strike") is inappropriate and will be disallowed, but that the company will eventually be permitted to present its novel legal theory.
Hardware Hacking

Scientists Hack Cellphone To Detect Diseases 100

Posted by kdawson
from the blue-blood dept.
Dave Bullock (eecue) plugs his piece up at Wired on a cellphone modded into a portable blood tester. This could become a significant piece of medical technology. "A new MacGyver-esque cellphone hack could bring cheap, on-the-spot disease detection to even the most remote villages on the planet. Using only an LED, plastic light filter, and some wires, scientists at UCLA have modded a cellphone into a portable blood tester capable of detecting HIV, malaria, and other illnesses. Blood tests today require either refrigerator-sized machines that cost hundreds of thousands of dollars or a trained technician who manually identifies and counts cells under a microscope. These systems are slow, expensive and require dedicated labs to function. And soon they could be a thing of the past."
Privacy

+ - Time to encrypt all P2P traffic? 3

Submitted by VORNAN-20
VORNAN-20 (318139) writes "Yesterday's item here about Comcast screwing around with P2P traffic brings up an idea. Is it time to change the P2P standard to encrypt all traffic? I think that almost any current PC would have no problem handling the extra load, and really, Comcast or any ISP has no business knowing what you are sending in the first place. I am not a network guy but I think that this is doable. If azureus, ktorrent, etc were all to come out with an "encrypt all packets using " option maybe this could be managed quickly and cleanly. It would be best to move quickly before all of the ISPs catch on to this. Come on developers, liberate us from the network meanies!!"

Comment: Re:Uniform Commercial Code does all of that too. (Score 2, Informative) 280

by matthewp (#20692221) Attached to: Does the UK iPhone Plan Add Up?
Valdrax wrote: I kind of like the UK's rules better for buying goods at a store, but I'd hate to be seller on eBay or their equivalent of craigslist.

Those requirements only apply to sales by traders. Items sold by private individuals only have to be 'as described'.

A particularly active eBay seller might be considered a trader, but people trying to get rid of their old stuff don't need to worry.

Top Ten Things Overheard At The ANSI C Draft Committee Meetings: (1) Gee, I wish we hadn't backed down on 'noalias'.

Working...