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Software

Vim 7.2 Released 106

Posted by kdawson
from the vigor-too dept.
sanguisdex writes "After fifteen months of work: a brand new Vim release! This is a stable version. There are many bug fixes and updated runtime files. The only new feature worth mentioning is support for floating point. Upgrading from a previous version is highly recommended: a few crashing bugs and several security issues were fixed. For the details see the announcement or go directly to the download page."

Comment: Re:UW licensing doesn't do it for me. (Score 1) 1131

by matthewn (#26734577) Attached to: Favorite text editor?
> UW licensing doesn't do it for me.

What, you mean the Apache license isn't free enough?

Pico was freed when Pine was freed -- as Alpine.

http://www.washington.edu/alpine/

hence http://packages.debian.org/sid/alpine-pico and etc.

Nano is certainly more featureful these days, but licensing has not been a valid knock against pico for some time now.
Image

World's Oldest Marijuana Stash Found 108

Posted by samzenpus
from the it's-a-little-dry dept.
jage2 writes "Researchers say they have located the world's oldest stash of marijuana in a tomb in a remote part of China. The cache of cannabis is about 2,700 years old and was clearly 'cultivated for psychoactive purposes,' rather than as fibre for clothing, or as food, says a research paper in the Journal of Experimental Botany. The 789 grams of dried cannabis was buried alongside a light-haired, blue-eyed Caucasian man, likely a shaman of the Gushi culture, near Turpan in northwestern China."
Privacy

Flash Cookies, a Little-Known Privacy Threat 225

Posted by kdawson
from the flashblock-considered-mandatory dept.
Wiini recommends a blog posting exploring Flash cookies, a little-known threat to privacy, and how you can get control of them. 98% of browsers have Macromedia Flash Player installed, and the cookies it enables have some interesting properties. They have no expiration date; they store 100 KB of data by default, with an unlimited maximum; they can't be deleted by your browser; and they send previous visit information and history, by default, without your permission. I was amazed at some of the sites, not visited in a year or more, that still had Flash cookies on my machine. Here's the user-unfriendly GUI for deleting them, one at a time, each one requiring confirmation.
Microsoft

Microsoft Programming Contest Hacked and Defaced 151

Posted by kdawson
from the star-developers dept.
davidmwilliams writes "Microsoft followed their major annual Tech-Ed event in Australia with a week-long programming contest called 'DevSta,' to find 'star developers.' While the quantity and quality of submissions suggest a poor turnout, it certainly caught the attention of at least two hackers who left their mark. Here is the low-down on the contest, what happened, by whom, and screen shots for posterity in case it's been fixed by the time you read this. And unless the volume of submissions increase dramatically within the next few hours, someone may be awarded an Xbox for doing nothing more than rewriting the Windows calculator as a .NET app."
Programming

Getting Paid To Abandon an Open Source Project? 654

Posted by Soulskill
from the money-vs.-warm-fuzzies dept.
darkeye writes "I'm facing a difficult dilemma and looking for opinions. I've been contributing heavily to an open source project, making considerable changes to code organization and quality, but the work is unfinished at the moment. Now, a company is approaching me to continue my changes. They want to keep the improvements to themselves, which is possible since the project is published under the BSD license. That's fair, as they have all the rights to the work they pay for in full. However, they also want me to sign a non-competition clause, which would bar me from ever working on and publishing results for the original open source project itself, even if done separately, in my free time. How would you approach such a decision? On one side, they'd provide resources to work on an interesting project. On the other, it would make me an outcast in the project's community. Moreover, they would take ownership of not just what they paid for, but also my changes leading up to this moment, and I wouldn't be able to continue on my original codebase in an open source manner if I sign their contract."
Education

+ - Prof denied tenure for Intelligent Design belief

Submitted by isabull
isabull (1107225) writes "Two Iowa State University (ISU) faculty members of the department that rejected astronomer Guillermo Gonzalez's tenure application have admitted that his work on intelligent design played a role in the department's denial of tenure. "What possible academic reason was there to deny tenure to a candidate who met or exceeded every requirement?" asked Dr. John West, associate director of Discovery Institute's Center for Science & Culture, the nation's leading think-tank supporting research into the scientific theory of intelligent design. "This is clearly a case of viewpoint discrimination and an attack on Dr. Gonzalez's academic freedom and free speech rights." http://www.discovery.org/scripts/viewDB/index.php? command=view&id=4064&program=CSC%20-%20Views%20and %20News"
Education

+ - Stanford kowtows to **AA campaign

Submitted by
Gogl
Gogl writes "With RIAA (read: Sony et al.) "pre-litigation" threats looming, Stanford has decided to (warning, PDF) pass the costs down to the students "who are jeopardizing the Stanford network by using it as platform to steal songs, movies, TV shows, video games, books and software." DMCA violations will result in a network disconnection, with reconnection costing $100 the first time, $500 the second, and $1000 the third. Stands in pretty sharp contrast to the stance taken by the Harvard law professor discussed here earlier."
Software

+ - Ubuntu Media Center to use Elisa instead of MythTV

Submitted by clevelandguru
clevelandguru (612010) writes "Canonical is working on a Media Center Editon of Ubuntu. Recently, the Ubuntu Media Center Team made a decision to use Elisa instead of MythTV. Elisa is still in development and lacks lot of features that are in MythTV, but It has a very impressive user interface. Here are some screenshots of Elisa. Elisa uses GStreamer Multimedia Framework which is legally appealing compared to FFmpeg that MythTV uses."
The Courts

+ - Shocking Admission In Reiser Murder Case

Submitted by
saudadelinux
saudadelinux writes "Wired magazine is carrying a story in which a Sean Sturgeon, a former lover of Reiser's ex-wife (and a former friend of his), admitted to killing eight people unrelated to the case. "(Deputy District Attorney) Paul Hora indicated that the court was ordering him to divulge this information," defense attorney Richard Tamor said last Friday." He also said that Sturgeon had confessed to a potential ninth murder, but that Sturgeon wasn't sure if the victim was fully dead when he left him.""
Slashdot.org

+ - Homeland Security Classifies TRON as "Sensitiv

Submitted by Tiago
Tiago (666) writes "Just came across this story on Kuro5hin. In short the DHS classified the movie Tron as sensitive because it contains some footage of a nuclear reactor on Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Quoting the article: "TRON is a science fiction film that takes place within a computer's circuits. Protagonist Kevin Flynn is pulled into the computer via laser by the malevolent Master Control Program. However, official concern reportedly centers around a portion of the movie's live-action sequence which was filmed at Shiva, a nuclear fusion research facility created at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.""

Judge Says Too Bad To Webcasters Upset About New Webcast Rates->

From feed by techdirtfeed
Last month, when the RIAA pushed through new webcasting royalty rates that were clearly designed to kill off a lot of webcasters, many people said not to worry, that the whole thing was just part of a negotiation. While the Copyright Royalty Board finally noticed that people weren't too happy about the new rates and agreed to hold some hearings, today they rejected those complaints and said that they won't change the rates, and everyone better pay up by May 15th. Webcasters are now looking to appeal to both the Appeals Court as well as Congress -- but recognize that either move will probably take a while, and go well beyond the May 15th deadline. The end result, of course, is actually going to hurt the music industry greatly. Webcasting has always been a huge promotional driver for artists -- especially niche artists who wouldn't get any publicity any other way. The recording industry apparently still hasn't figured out that it can expand its market by letting people promote the content for it. Instead, it wants to charge for that promotion, in a short-sighted effort to charge for every use of the content, even ones that expand the market and allow the overall industry to make much more money.
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