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+ - Best way to [freely] get rid of old stuff? 1

Submitted by marquinhocb
marquinhocb (949713) writes "What do people use to get rid of their old stuff online? Where's the best place to execute a nice little spring cleaning? Is craigslist the main place still pretty much? I found a couple of other newer/small sites, like bonanza, kaboodle, vendalism — anyone have experience with those?
Is eBay classifieds effective at all?"

Comment: Making a game and PLAYING a game are NOT the same (Score 5, Insightful) 733

by marquinhocb (#31902878) Attached to: Roger Ebert On Why Video Games Can Never Be Art

Is Roger Ebert really that dense?

It's like making the argument that a movie isn't art because you're sitting on your ass while watching it, whereas a painting you have to stand up for.

Art is not about the person VIEWING or EXPERIENCING - it is about the creator.

Clearly WATCHING a movie or PLAYING a video game is not art.

MAKING one, on the other hand, can be.

Comment: Yes (Score 1) 263

by marquinhocb (#30481850) Attached to: Are You Using SPF Records?

SPF is the way to go. Most public email out there (GMail, Hotmail, Yahoo) will mark email as spam if an email is sent from a server that isn't listed on the SPF record.
Obviously this isn't the only technique to fight spam (You validate that the sender really belongs to X.com, not that X.com isn't a spammer), but it helps.

As for the link to "SPF is harmful", that's about the biggest load of bull I've ever seen. It's inaccurate, and is an uncommon case (how often does mail forwarding happen these days with everyone using non-ISP-bound free email services?). It's like saying we should shutdown the internet because it's not completely accessible to devices with black&white screens.

As I said before, all the major free email service providers take SPF into account (test it out yourself - setup your domain with SPF, and send an email to your gmail/hotmail from an unauthorized IP).

That said, SPF is pretty easy to setup. Just a quick little txt in your domain and you're good to go. This site will help you with generating your SPF:
http://www.openspf.org/Tools

+ - Android 2.0 features turn-by-turn directions->

Submitted by marquinhocb
marquinhocb (949713) writes "Android 2.0 now has turn-by-turn directions for their GPS/Map product. Better yet, it uses Street View, so you also get to see exactly where you're turning.
"Google said its new Google Maps Navigation product will provide real-time, turn-by-turn directions directly within cell phones that are based on the new version of its Android software... ...features speech recognition and a visual display that incorporates Google's online archive of street photographs""

Link to Original Source

+ - Tesla breaks land record for electric car-> 1

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "The CEO of an Australian ISP has driven his Tesla Roadster into the record books, completing 501km on a single electric charge in the 2009 Global Green Challenge — beating the Tesla's official specifications, which rate the all-electric sports car capable of a maximum 390km per charge. The previous record was held by another Roadster in the 387km Rallye Monte Carlo d'Energies Alternatives in April this year. In a race specifically designed for alternative energy vehicles (such as hydrogen and electricty), the Roadster triumphed to win honours as the only vehicle to complete the entire course. Though to be fair, that race course was a mixture of twists, turns and hills."
Link to Original Source

+ - Bullet train for California->

Submitted by marquinhocb
marquinhocb (949713) writes "Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger requested $4.7 billion in federal stimulus money Friday to help build an 800-mile bullet train system from San Diego to San Francisco.
      "We're traveling on our trains at the same speed as 100 years ago," the governor said. "That is inexcusable. America must catch up."
      Planners said the train would be able to travel from Los Angeles to San Francisco in two hours and 40 minutes, traveling at speeds of more than 200 miles per hour.

About damned time! There comes a point when "let's add another lane" is no longer a viable option!"

Link to Original Source

Comment: Perhaps not good for general use, but huh? (Score 1) 336

by marquinhocb (#29612699) Attached to: Initial Reviews of Google Wave; Neat, but Noisy

So I'm lucky enough to get to try out Wave. It's cool - and I agree that maybe for the general public it won't have much use.

But I would say that the statement that it is "not as productive as Twitter or email" is a pretty ridiculous and uninformed statement.

Now if the author would've said something like "I would rather have a videoconference/meeting to discuss a new idea instead of using Wave". OK, that's a valid point. A meeting is fast and has quick turnaround times.

But the real idea behind Wave is, you know, those emails like this:

> I think bla bla 1
Good point John, didn't think about bla bla 1

>> What do you think of bla bla 2? Will it work?
> I think we should use bla bla 2 in addition to bla bla 1
You are both correct, John and Jenny. We should definitely look into bla bla 2

Wave makes looking at an email message like that a lot cleaner, a lot simpler, a lot easier, and a lot more productive.

Now how you would compare the above use-case to using Twitter... is beyond me. And as for the above email format being more productive than Wave, well then, maybe you should stop using email and go back to writing snail mail.

If on the other hand you would rather have a meeting or videoconference to have a discussion as above, well then... you're right, that is more productive. But it's not always an option, and Wave fills in that gap nicely.

+ - Wireless Charging Laptop->

Submitted by
marquinhocb
marquinhocb writes "Dell on Tuesday unveiled its ultra-thin personal computer — the Latitude Z600 — with its long-awaited "inductive charging" feature.

The $1,999 PC appears to be aimed at Apple's Air laptop computer, as both are very thin and very light. The Latitude Z weighs 4.5 pounds and is just 0.55 inches thick. Its distinguishing feature is its ability to charge the device simply by placing the notebook computer on a custom stand with inductive charging that powers the PC in the same way that many electric toothbrushes are charged."

Link to Original Source

Comment: One more point.... the kernel (Score 1) 3

by marquinhocb (#28814595) Attached to: Google: Why not buy BeOS?

Forgot one last point heh. The kernel. Without a doubt, as it is the newest kernel, it uses some of the latest technologies.

As I said in my blog, the most amazing thing about BeOS was its responsiveness. I've never seen anything like it. You should try it out under Virtual PC or VMWare. Even today it makes me drop my jaw.

The test I just did the other day (seeing as floppy disks are no longer a very valid argument heh): I had 3 file searches all going on at the same time. I then opened up a couple of applications, as well as opening up a folder in the shell. Well, I think you know what Windows will do when you try this: Unresponsive system galore. I'm honestly not sure what Linux will do, so I can't say anything there. On Be, it was marvelous. The system was still 100% responsive. The searches continued in the background, slowly, and the applications I was opening as well as the shell window opened beautifully. The file list in the shell window loaded slowly, of course, as the disk was under a heavy load. But it loaded none the less.

This is what I meant by "years ahead" :)

Comment: Re:Years ahead? Really? (Score 2, Interesting) 3

by marquinhocb (#28814529) Attached to: Google: Why not buy BeOS?

Hi CarpetShark. Sorry, only saw your comment now.

Well, I'm not sure what your knowledge level is, as far as programming goes. I will assume from your replies that you have some programming knowledge, my apologies if my assumption is incorrect.

BeOS was built for multiple-CPU computers. In fact, the first BeBox came with 2 processors. As you know, multiple-core processors is the future. The core of Windows was made for a single-processor, and although the NT kernel was greatly improved for multiple cpu's, it was not built for it. Point for Be.

BeOS was built IN C++ and has an OOP, C++ API. Windows and linux, again as you likely know, have a C, non-OOP core API. There are wrappers that make them seem OOP, but they are simply that, wrappers. Another point for Be.

The problem with Windows (and to some extent Linux) is that they're continuously adding on to an old, outdated core. This can especially be seen with Windows. The root of the Windows API goes all the way back to Windows 3.0.

If you've ever done programming, you likely know that every once in a while, revision upon revision upon revision just makes one big load of crap, and you have to start anew, learning from your mistakes in the past and getting a new system that incorporates functionality to do what you want (instead of having it patched on).

Windows never did this, and neither did Linux. Perhaps I should've rephrased to say the CORE of BeOS is years ahead of the Windows core.

As for the Be API, I used it myself, and it is anything but messy. I wont' argue with the limited point, but that's part of the beauty of it. It's not limited in the sense that you can't do what you need to do. It's limited in the sense that Be was a simple, new OS. It didn't have a gazillion API's that bloated your memory. But that's nothing that couldn't be expanded upon, if necessary.

Google

+ - Google: Why not buy BeOS?-> 3

Submitted by
Marcos Boyington
Marcos Boyington writes "An operating system is the next logical step for Google. If they're going to be competing head-on with Microsoft, being dependent on Microsoft is not the best podium to stand on. So I can understand why they're coming out with Chrome OS, and why concentrating on Netbooks first. But why make their own from scratch? Why not buy the sources for BeOS, an amazing operating system that went under? It seems this would not only be a financially wise solution, it would also put Google years ahead of Microsoft in OS technology."
Link to Original Source
Social Networks

+ - Should I give in to Facebook's legal demands?-> 1

Submitted by
marquinhocb
marquinhocb writes "I got a FedEx Overnight letter on Tuesday from Facebook Inc.'s legal team at Perkins & Coie requesting that I take down a feature on my social networking website. The feature they are demanding I take down is one that gives users the option of importing their Facebook profile (and if they choose, sending their friends a link to their new profile).

The letter, in far more words, said that I may be breaking spam laws (I'm not, as all messages I send have a "unsubscribe" link) and that I am breaching their terms of service by "soliciting users to enter their login information" and "using another user's Facebook account without authorization from the Company" (but, mind you, with authorization from the account's owner).

Do you think this is a fair demand? What should I do? Should I comply and take down the feature? Or should I fight this?"

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