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Comment: Re:Prime Computer (Score 1) 93

by mark0 (#45240995) Attached to: Computers and Doctor Who
BTW... I remember you. I was working in the compiler department when you were building that test suite management system. You had a minor run-in with a very young and somewhat dickish engineer. That would be me. In the ~25 years since I can certainly say I'm older and I hope I can say I'm less dickish.
Robotics

A Mind Made From Memristors 320

Posted by Soulskill
from the fully-functional dept.
Csiko writes "Researchers at Boston University's department of cognitive and neural systems are working on an artificial brain implemented with memristors. 'A memristor is a two-terminal device whose resistance changes depending on the amount, direction, and duration of voltage that's applied to it. But here's the really interesting thing about a memristor: Whatever its past state, or resistance, it freezes that state until another voltage is applied to change it. Maintaining that state requires no power.' Also theoretically described, solid state versions of memristors have not been implemented until recently. Now researchers in Boston claim that memristors are the new key technology to implement highly integrated, powerful artificial brains on cheap and widely available hardware within five years."
United States

Deported Russian (Spy?) Worked At Microsoft 162

Posted by timothy
from the sure-why-not dept.
subtropolis writes "KOMO News in Seattle is reporting that a recently-deported 23-yr-old Russian man 'appears to have ties to the recently-exposed Russian counterintelligence' (according to unnamed Feds). The article states that he admitted to unspecified immigration violations and was promptly shown the door on Tuesday. It also says that 'Microsoft confirms Karetnikov worked as an entry-level software tester for less than a year.' So, I'm thinking that MS had better take a really good at their logs for that time. He may have got in at 'entry-level' but his abilities may have been a fair bit beyond that. ... Interestingly, his admission to mere 'violations' and swift departure would be right in line with how this swap has gone down. The four Russians who were flown to Britain and the US had to first sign a confession before President Medvedev granted them pardons." The same news is at CBS News, too.
Transportation

Should Cities Install Moving Sidewalks? 698

Posted by timothy
from the that-and-bicycle-elevators dept.
theodp writes "The real problem nowadays is how to move crowds,' said the manager of the failed Trottoir Roulant Rapide high-speed (9 km/h) people mover project. 'They can travel fast over long distances with the TGV (high-speed train) or airplanes, but not over short distances (under 1 km).' Slate's Tom Vanderbilt explores whether moving walkways might be viable for urban transportation. The first moving sidewalks were unveiled at Chicago's 1893 Columbian Exposition, and at one point seemed destined to supplant some subways, but never took root in cities for a variety of reasons. Vanderbilt turns to science fiction for inspiration, where 30 mph walkways put today's tortoise-like speed ranges of .5-.83 m/s to shame. In the meantime, Jerry Seinfeld will just have to learn to live with 'the people who get onto the moving walkway and just stand there. Like it's a ride.'"
Google

+ - Mobile Phone Sales Rise, iPhone and Android Grow->

Submitted by mark0
mark0 (750639) writes "Gartner reports that mobile phone sales have risen in 1Q2010, up 17% year-on-year. That's good news for iPhone OS and Android, which saw their market shares grow to 15.4% and 9.6%, respectively. Other platforms slipped and ZDNet already proclaims the death of Windows Mobile. They suggest open-sourcing WM could have saved it, but that doesn't seem to be helping Symbian."
Link to Original Source
Image

Oil Leak Could Be Stopped With a Nuke 799

Posted by samzenpus
from the lesser-of-two-disasters dept.
An anonymous reader writes "The oil leak in the Gulf of Mexico could be stopped with an underground nuclear blast, a Russian newspaper reports. Komsomoloskaya Pravda, the best-selling Russian daily, reports that in Soviet times such leaks were plugged with controlled nuclear blasts underground. The idea is simple, KP writes: 'The underground explosion moves the rock, presses on it, and, in essence, squeezes the well's channel.' It's so simple, in fact, that the Soviet Union used this method five times to deal with petrocalamities, and it only didn't work once."

The absent ones are always at fault.

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