Follow Slashdot stories on Twitter

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Slashdot videos: Now with more Slashdot!

  • View

  • Discuss

  • Share

We've improved Slashdot's video section; now you can view our video interviews, product close-ups and site visits with all the usual Slashdot options to comment, share, etc. No more walled garden! It's a work in progress -- we hope you'll check it out (Learn more about the recent updates).

×

Comment: Re:Actually there are certain tests (Score 1) 57

by marcello_dl (#49337095) Attached to: Short Circuit In LHC Could Delay Restart By Weeks

Simulations are inspired by the way the universe behaves.
If you discover that the universe can be implemented in the same ways a simulation is, you have simply done a kind of circular reasoning. Reality looks like a simulation that looks like reality.

Not to detract from studies (captcha: proceed), It is very interesting to model how the universe MIGHT be implemented, but the ultimate implementation, or whether the concept of implementation has any meaning applied to the universe as an object, are theoretically and practically beyond our reach.

Comment: Re:It's the universe trying to stop us innit... (Score 1) 57

by marcello_dl (#49335981) Attached to: Short Circuit In LHC Could Delay Restart By Weeks

> Emulators DON'T have the quirks and timing issues of real hardware

In fact the comparison was among the host hw, not the emulated hw vs. bare metal. The code correctly implementing a full VM must run with the same results on all hardware where it has correctly been ported. I know it's theoretical because VM code gets advantage of bare metal (hw clock, RNG) but then the simulation is not perfect and it's a problem of the sim, not of the example.

To cut it shorter, in the domain of tic tac toe games defined as the sequence of X and O placements, one game is exactly the same no matter if it was vs. man or vs. machine, or on a blackboard, or on a piece of paper, as all of such variables are metadata, not data.

Comment: Re:It's the universe trying to stop us innit... (Score 4, Interesting) 57

by marcello_dl (#49334181) Attached to: Short Circuit In LHC Could Delay Restart By Weeks

The universe does not need to stop us, because from the inside of it you can never prove you have the faintest idea of the way it is implemented, even if you got to model and understand every single particle and every single interaction. Does an insulated VM run on intel or on powerpc or on a commodore 64 with a hell of a RAM expansion? no way to know from the inside of it.

So the most rational reason becomes: they tried using systemd to speed things up but some not well documented glitch made the thing shut down. The short circuit is a scapegoat.

Comment: Re:So much for Debian 8, then... (Score 1) 338

by marcello_dl (#49210561) Attached to: Google Chrome Requires TSYNC Support Under Linux

> How about us people who used to think Debian was the very best Linux server system in existence, and who evangelized its use and put it in businesses and donated to SPI.

Fakedebianist pls, I don't think there are that many of you that don't know what a stable release is.

Jessie is about to be debian stable, which means that the packages have undergone "some" QA testing, which provides the quality that made debian what it is.

Somebody asking to backport stuff to jessie at this stage, after the problem was known months in advance or so TFS says, is either ignorant or malicious.

The correct way to handle this is to ship a tested version of chrome, which implies no kernel patching, and apply security patches as usual. Those itching to run the latest chrome can run a newer kernel, run a backported chrome + kernel patch (maybe package it in a module and use the dkms system which works for my 3d drivers very well), run chrome in a VM (which is what I'd do if I was concerned about what data flows between chrome and google).

The debian dev rejecting the request has been rude, but he ends up being right.

Comment: Re:The whole idea is crazy (Score 1) 288

by marcello_dl (#49029609) Attached to: Quantum Equation Suggests Universe Had No Beginning

"Why" implies pinpointing a cause, a cause implies a time reference. "Why" is therefore undefined outside time. The question therefore does not necessarily makes sense.

Back to topic, I prefer the idea of an infinite in time universe. It does not exclude a god: Think f(x)=x for x in R. You have just defined a both ways infinite set of results and you know each f automatically since it's so easy to calculate. So, you, a mortal, made an abstraction who is infinite in two ways. A point in your universe can travel indefinitely yet the abstraction itself had an origin.
In fact I was arguing these kind of things around here too, so I can't even be accused of readjusting in a "no true scotman" fashion.

It's way better than the big bang, because the expansion of space itself, dark energy and dark matter are, until proven otherwise, copouts. Useful copouts maybe, but so were epicycles.

Comment: Re:They always [conveniently] miss facts... (Score 1) 458

by marcello_dl (#48956585) Attached to: How, and Why, Apple Overtook Microsoft

Let's say you want to put an mp3 on an ipod and retrieve it from another pc, which is ABC tier stuff on most cheap players.

Detail the steps if you disagree it's a comic endeavour on the ipod.

Don't forget to mention the case where the other pc is linux and the ipod needed some firewire id put in a file.

Firewire ID... on an USB device. This is Kafka tier stuff.

Comment: Re:They always [conveniently] miss facts... (Score 1, Insightful) 458

by marcello_dl (#48946437) Attached to: How, and Why, Apple Overtook Microsoft

The younger and dumber Jobs bet the company on new shiny tech, forfeiting entire lines like the apple II in the process. The MacOS pre-quicktime also offered the most consistent user experience ever. If you wanted to do digital audio reliably, the ancient design of MacOS beat the much touted preemptive multitasking, memory protected Win systems.

Result: Apple on constant brink of collapse, saved by Microsoft who bought Apple stock so they could say We are not a monopoly.

The older Jobs, butthurt after being ousted by Apple, returns as a control freak, cranks out colored macs with no expansion options, the ipod (a portable storage unit who could not work as portable storage, an item with a standard connection that needed custom and single platform software to work), the Iphone (they saw nokia put a pc in a phone with the nokia 770, and so they put the equivalent of a locked down console in a phone, BRILLIANT), treats users as dumbasses (you're holding it wrong).

Result? Microsoft dethroned, AND History rewritten so that Jobs is synonimous with genius.

Who is "the prince of this world" again? QED.

Comment: Re:That's a nice democracy you have there... (Score 4, Insightful) 392

It's funny because the threat is EXACTLY how I think things should be done.
You can sure commit crimes shifting bits around, but most such deeds have to reflect IRL at some point. So let the cops follow the bad guys IRL. Strong encryption can't do much when I see what's on your screen. So by all means, spy on suspects instead of bulk-collecting false positives.

It's also quite ridiculous that international banking can keep doing transactions at the speed of light while the NSA and pals want to access to your data. I'd say follow the money first.

Bulk spying is not about preventing crime anyway. It's about control, it yields potential weaknesses for each one, regardless of his actual behavior.

An inclined plane is a slope up. -- Willard Espy, "An Almanac of Words at Play"

Working...