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Comment: Re:Brain ZAP! (Score 1) 284

by manwargi (#47396761) Attached to: Consciousness On-Off Switch Discovered Deep In Brain

The problem with dystopian theories like this is bullets are cheap. If you've subjugated the public to the point that you can force expensive brain surgery on them, why bother? Just shoot the people you don't like.

As technology gets better and better, especially at the rapid rate that it grows, exploiting this discovery may not always be that much more expensive.

Comment: Re:Journalistic integrity in short supply (Score 1) 156

by manwargi (#46571965) Attached to: In the Unverified Digital World, Are Journalists and Bloggers Equal?

It all comes down to which of your sources has interests most aligned with your own.

And thus we have people of each ideology living in their own worlds due to the echo chambers that form. Ironic how truth has become a lost cause in the age of information.

Comment: Re:Drone Occupation (Score 1) 506

by manwargi (#46355265) Attached to: US War Machine Downsizing?

It absolutely does and a considerable number of officers will commit suicide, turn into monsters themselves, or otherwise wind up damaged as a result of years taking so many risks and being in that much danger. They see humanity at their lowest-- ranging from all the things you'd expect in the hood to domestic incidents in people who would appear normal to the rest of the world. They get to see the gruesome ways organized crime makes an example out of someone who crossed them. When there's been a big traffic accident, they have to go be there. They get to see and smell the aftermath of murder and death, and to a lesser extent witness how it affects the people related to these incidents.

Although the job may be less deadly while the soldier eventually gets to go home, the police officer is home. Over the course of a long career of this nature what might be changing psychologically?

Comment: Re:Why all the )(*)(@! Hate?!? (Score 1) 2219

by manwargi (#46182281) Attached to: Slashdot Tries Something New; Audience Responds!

Animosity towards change is natural and to be expected of an old fashioned place like Slashdot, especially considering how long it has been around. In the past there had been a couple of pretty terrible changes to the comments section that left a bad taste in the mouths of regulars, and precedents like that undoubtedly come to mind when a redesign comes about.

I'm... going to stick with the classic layout as long as I'm able to out of familiarity as well, but I'd be willing to give a redesign a fair chance if it retained all the traditional elements and didn't get too fancy with the scripts.

Businesses

Virtual Boss Keeps Workers On a Short Leash 664

Posted by samzenpus
from the keeping-an-eye-on-things dept.
Gr8Apes writes "Hitachi has created a 'perfect virtual boss.' The company is manufacturing and selling a device intended to increase efficiency in the workplace called the Hitachi Business Microscope (paywalled). 'The device looks like an employee ID badge that most companies issue. Workers are instructed to wear it in the office. Embedded inside each badge, according to Hitachi, are "infrared sensors, an accelerometer, a microphone sensor and a wireless communication device." Hitachi says that the badges record and transmit to management "who talks to whom, how often, where and how energetically." It tracks everything. If you get up to walk around the office a lot, the badge sends information to management about how often you do it, and where you go. If you stop to talk with people throughout the day, the badge transmits who you're talking to (by reading your co-workers' badges), and for how long. Do you contribute at meetings, or just sit there? Either way, the badge tells your bosses.'"

Comment: Re:Why does everybody want to get on drugs? (Score 4, Insightful) 526

Everyone has a vice for coping with a hard, painful world. Sometimes it is drinking. Sometimes it is smoking. Sometimes it is cheating on their partner. Porn. Hard drugs; and some would dare to argue that prescribed psyche medication is the same thing but more legal. Escapism to the fantasy of books/movies/games. The excitement of gambling. In the absence of these things people will do absolutely absurd things to get out of their skull such as strangling themselves or "i-dosing". Don't forget about suicide. Many brilliant minds belong to someone addicted to something or depressed and looking for a way out. While I don't smoke or use any drugs myself I won't judge anybody who does too hard.

Comment: Re:Happy President (Score 2) 569

Elections currently take the form of the Prisoner's Dilemma. The dominant strategy is to vote for the "lesser of two evils" because the risks involved voting third party are far more severe, as demonstrated in the 2000 election.

America could benefit from Approval voting and perhaps that would be a system that the public of both the left and right wing parties could agree upon? The big question would be how to get the idea to catch on and eventually voted in.

Privacy

Mozilla Labs Experiment Distills Your History Into Interests 158

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the enjoys-long-trolls-on-the-beach dept.
Barence writes "Mozilla is proposing that the Firefox browser collects data on users' interests to pass on to websites. The proposal is designed to allow websites to personalize content to visitors' tastes, without sites having to suck up a user's browsing history, as they do currently. 'Let's say Firefox recognizes within the browser client, without any browsing history leaving my computer, that I'm interested in gadgets, comedy films, hockey and cooking,' says Justin Scott, a product manager from Mozilla Labs. 'Those websites could then prioritize articles on the latest gadgets and make hockey scores more visible. And, as a user, I would have complete control over which of my interests are shared, and with which websites.'" This is the result of an extended experiment. The idea is that your history is used to generate a set of interests which you can then share voluntarily with websites, hopefully discouraging the blanket tracking advertising systems love to do now.
Censorship

California Lawmaker Wants 3-D Printers To Be Regulated 856

Posted by Soulskill
from the i-demand-background-checks-for-sketchpads-and-protractors dept.
New submitter phrackthat writes with news that California State Senator Leland Yee (D-S.F.) says he wants regulations to track who owns and uses 3-D printers. Yee's comments come in response to the recent news of Defense Distributed's successful test-firing of a 3-D printed gun. "He's concerned that just about anyone with access to those cutting-edge printers can arm themselves. 'Terrorists can make these guns and do some horrible things to an individual and then walk away scott-free, and that is something that is really dangerous,' said Yee. He said while this new technology is impressive, it must be regulated when it comes to making guns. He says background checks, requiring serial numbers and even registering them could be part of new legislation that he says will protect the public. Yee added, 'This particular gun has no trace whatsoever.'"

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