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Comment Re:Because Reasons (Score 1) 419

Indeed, I've been looking at uMatrix (in combination with NoScript), and there's a lot to recommend it. As far as cookie management goes, however, it's not as fine-grained as what Firefox had. You can only enable/disable a site's ability to set cookies. You can't inspect/approve every single cookie request itself. Sometimes you can get a site to work by accepting certain cookies and denying all others. FF's facility let you do that.

Comment Re:Because Reasons (Score 1) 419

You're the third person in this sub-thread alone to recommend Self-Destructing Cookies.

While I like the idea of its behavioral detection of tracking cookies, and its stats panel is informative, my ultimate problem is that it allows the cookies to be set in the first place. 99.9% of the cookies shoved at my browser are entirely, provably unnecessary -- the page displays the same regardless. As such, my philosophy is that they should never be accepted in the first place, even temporarily.

The cookie request is also a waste of bandwidth. If you're going to display the same page either way, why clog the pipe with a cookie that you're manifestly not doing anything meaningful with?

Comment Because Reasons (Score 4, Interesting) 419

It occurred to me after submitting the article that the per-cookie approval feature has been part of Firefox since it was called Netscape, so it's been around for a very long time.

Moreover, the allegation that enabling the feature destabilized the browser is pharmaceutically pure bullshit. I've been using the feature since its inception, and have Firefox windows open and running for days at a time without ill effect.

Contrariwise, I just went to check my cookie store, and found a bunch of new, unapproved, unwelcome, provably unnecessary cookies have appeared in just the week since I moved from v43 to v44. Deleting them after the fact is not a solution. Once set, tracking can take place immediately. The damage has already been done.

The proffered reasons for the change are easily shown to be false, so I do not hold out any hope that Mozilla management will have a change of heart on this matter and reinstate the long-standing feature.

Would anyone care to recommend a cookie management add-on?

Submission + - Firefox 44 Deletes Fine-Grained Cookie Management (mozilla.org)

ewhac writes: Among its other desirable features, Firefox included a feature allowing very fine-grained cookie management. When enabled, every time a Web site asked to set a cookie, Firefox would raise a dialog containing information about the cookie requested, which you could then approve or deny. An "exception" list also allowed you to mark selected domains as "Always allow" or "Always deny", so that the dialog would not appear for frequently-visited sites. It was an excellent way to maintain close, custom control over which sites could set cookies, and which specific cookies they could set. It also helped easily identify poorly-coded sites that unnecessarily requested cookies for every single asset, or which would hit the browser with a "cookie storm" — hundreds of concurrent cookie requests.

Mozilla quietly deleted this feature from Firefox 44, with no functional equivalent put in its place. Further, users who had enabled the "Ask before accept" feature have had that preference silently changed to, "Accept normally." The proffered excuse for the removal was that the feature was unmaintained, and that its users were, "probably crashing multiple times a day as a result" (although no evidence was presented to support this assertion). Mozilla's apparent position is that users wishing fine-grained cookie control should be using a third-party add-on instead, and that an "Ask before accept" option was, "not really nice to use on today's Web."

Submission + - All 12 Countries Sign off on the TPP (freezenet.ca)

Dangerous_Minds writes: News is surfacing that the TPP has officially been signed by all 12 countries. This marks the beginning of the final step towards ratification. Freezenet has a quick rundown of what copyright provisions are contained in the agreement including traffic shaping, site blocking, enforcement of copyright when infringement is "imminent", and a government mandate for ISPs to install backdoors for the purpose of tracking copyright infringement on the Internet.

Submission + - Push To Hack: Reverse engineering an IP camera (contextis.com)

tetraverse writes: For our most recent IoT adventure, we've examined an outdoor cloud security camera which like many devices of its generation a) has an associated mobile app b) is quick to setup and c) presents new security threats to your network.

Submission + - Patent troll VirnetX awarded $626M in damages from Apple (arstechnica.com)

Tackhead writes: Having won a $200M judgement against Microsoft in 2010, lost a $258M appeal against Cisco in 2013, and having beaten Apple for $368M in 2012, only to see the verdict overturned in 2014, patent troll VirnetX is back in the news, having been awarded $626M in damages arising from the 2012 Facetime patent infringement case against Apple.

Submission + - Stephen Elop Assumes Position In McMaster University

jones_supa writes: Technology maven Stephen Elop is coming home. McMaster University has officially announced that the former alumnus and Microsoft and Nokia executive has been named the distinguished engineering executive in residence at the school's faculty of engineering. It is an advisory position, where he will give insights into new research and teaching opportunities, as well as helping to translating academic knowledge to a wider audience. He will also give lectures twice a year, as well as sit on the dean's advisory council and act as an advisor to the dean. Elop is an alumnus of the McMaster Computer Engineering and Management Program, where he graduated in 1986. The faculty also awarded him with an honorary doctor of science degree in 2009.
Canada

A Legal Name Change Puts 'None of the Above' On Canadian Ballot (foxnews.com) 171

PolygamousRanchKid writes: The ballot to fill a legislative seat in Canada next month includes none of the above—and it's a real person. Sheldon Bergson, 46, had his name legally changed to Above Znoneofthe and is now a candidate for the Ontario legislature, the CBC reports. The election is Feb. 11. The ballot lists candidates in alphabetical order by surname so his name will be the 10th of the 10 candidates as Znoneofthe Above, according to CBC. One of his opponents is running on the line of the None of The Above Party. Maybe the American folks can learn from their cousins up north? Shouldn't every election have a line for "None of the above"? I can't wait until Little Bobby Tables hits 35.

Submission + - Candidate's legal name change puts 'none of the above' on ballot in Canada (foxnews.com)

PolygamousRanchKid writes: The ballot to fill a legislative seat in Canada next month includes none of the above—and it’s a real person. Sheldon Bergson, 46, had his name legally changed to Above Znoneofthe and is now a candidate for the Ontario legislature, the CBC reports. The election is Feb. 11. The ballot lists candidates in alphabetical order by surname so his name will be the 10th of the 10 candidates as Znoneofthe Above, according to CBC.

One of his opponents is running on the line of the None of The Above Party.

Maybe the American folks can learn from their cousins up north . . . ?

Submission + - Developers gather to help charities at massive virtual hack.summit() conference (hacksummit.org)

An anonymous reader writes: hack.summit (https://hacksummit.org) looks like a very interesting event — a pure virtual conference with a speaker roster that's surprisingly strong. The kicker is that it's all for charity to help coding non-profits. Lots of credible tech companies are behind it (Github, StackOverflow, IBM, etc). Part of the event is a global hackathon, where developers can hack over a weekend to help charities and win prizes.

Submission + - 18TB of Fraternal Order of Police data hacked (thecthulhu.com) 1

Dave_Minsky writes: Yesterday, someone by the name of Cthulhu released 18TB of sensitive data from the Fraternal Order of Police. The FOP is America's largest police union with more than 325,000 members in more than 2,100 lodges nationwide.

According to Cthulhu's website, the data were "submitted to me through a confidential source, and have asked me to distribute it in the public interest."

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