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Comment: Not really (Score 1) 239

by Gaygirlie (#47439437) Attached to: Slashdot Asks: Do You Want a Smart Watch?

I can't think of any use for a smart watch, to be quite frank. Can't dictate things to it without everyone around me hearing me, plus all the speech recognition - things I've tried handle Finnish poorly anyways. Too small a display to do anything useful with. Too small battery, would lead to endless frustration. Clock? I could just use a regular watch for that. I don't doubt that those can be totally awesome things for some people, but I just can't see myself belonging in that group.

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Journal: Milestones 1

Journal by mcgrew

Last weekend Mars, Ho! passed the magic 40,000 words, the number of words necessary for a science fiction work to be a novel.

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Journal: Mars, Ho! Chapter Twenty Nine

Journal by mcgrew

Movies
Destiny and me woke up at the same time the next morning. We cuddled a while, made love again, then made coffee and took a shower together while the robots made us steak and cheese omelettes and toast and hash browns. Destiny put on the news. There was something about a problem in one of the company's boat factories; some machinery malfunctioned and killed a guy. I sure took notice of that! They didn't really have much information about it, though

Comment: Re:I don't think she has a case against tor (Score 1) 309

by Gaygirlie (#47417417) Attached to: Tor Project Sued Over a Revenge Porn Business That Used Its Service

I don't think she has a case against tor at all because its already been ruled ISPs cannot nor even web sites cant be held responsible for what's its users do or upload.

Tor isn't an ISP. Tor is both the network consisting of individual users and the actual software that enables the connection to the network, but it is *not* an Internet service provider, it does not enable you to connect to the Internet nor does it charge you anything.

Comment: Re:Python for learning? Good choice. (Score 1) 412

by Kjella (#47413153) Attached to: Python Bumps Off Java As Top Learning Language

I'll disagree on that. We use white space to communicate our programs' block structure to other humans. Why should we use a different syntax to tell the compiler the same information?

IMHO it's far easier to logically get it right with braces and pretty-print it for proper indentation than fiddling around with whitespace.

Comment: Re:more leisure time for humans! (Score 1) 526

by Kjella (#47409439) Attached to: Foxconn Replacing Workers With Robots

That's revisionist history, ludicrously so. Marx never foresaw anything of the sort. He believed firmly in the labor theory of value, and as such all economic power derived from human labor, not from mechanical power. Communism was about combating the concentration of economic power in the hands of a few people who owned the means of production, at the expense of the masses who provided the labor (and hence the real value).

It is not very hard to re-frame Marx in terms of the knowledge worker, where the owner of the means of production like the [e-tail site/online bank/search engine/social networking site] exploits the individual developers who produce the system but alone are insignificant and replaceable leading to a race to the bottom where providing the labor is greatly underpaid while stock owners and other capital holders make off with the profits. That does of course not exclude the possibility that capital owners will pay off unique individuals and start-ups that threaten to shift the competitive landscape or compete with the existing companies, but more of a global mutual interest among all companies to depress wages.

Even in the absence of formal collusion it's not hard to reach a form of unwritten understanding in direct and transparent competition of substitute goods. For example on the way to work there are two gas stations quite literally across the road from each other, if one drops the price of course the other will follow. So what makes them profit most, both high or both low prices? Now apply the same to store clerk wages, of course neither has an interest in raising the general wages. It is really the same when you see Google/Apple/Microsoft/whatever involved in anti-poaching agreements, surely they could just poach back but it'd raise the wage costs for everyone so better if they don't.

I do agree though that he thought the actual value lay with the labor, not the machinery but I guess you can equally apply this to software, doesn't really all value of the code stem from the one who developed it? Granted, he got paid for it but whether that pay is fair is another matter. Remember, Marx never claimed the workers were forced to work anywhere at gun point. What he said was that all the choices were bad ones and workers were exploited no matter who they worked for. It's not like market economists dispute that companies would lower labor costs if they could either, they just refuse to do something about it. If the supply and demand don't add up to a wage you're comfortable with do something else.

Of course we won't run out of jobs as such, but when there's more people wanting jobs than there are jobs, real wages start trending downwards as workers undercut each other. The relative wealth between those with capital and those who work for a living diverges and it becomes harder and harder to join them as their holdings increase faster than any savings you can make. As long as human labor remains essential to the function of society, we can still unite and strike for higher wages though. If we're no longer essential and the system runs on robotics, software and a few scabs until we go back to work, well then we're in deep shit.

Comment: Re:Chattel slavery is so passé (Score 1) 21

by mcgrew (#47406323) Attached to: The Counter-Revolution of 1776

You're a little behind the times, that stopped eighteen years ago when PWORA was passed and AFDC abolished.

These days slaves are made with "right to work" laws and strict limits on the extent of the safety net.

I gained my freedom this past February. YAY! Free at last! Free at last! Thank God almighty, I'm free at last!

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Journal: Mars, Ho! Chapter Twenty Eight

Journal by mcgrew

Heads
"Good morning, Mister Green."
"Good morning, Mister Osbourne. Ladies, gentlemen, I had a particularly trying day yesterday, as a few of you know," the CEO said, looking at his chief of engineering. "We have a serious problem in the company and it lands squarely in your laps. Folks, we're getting complacent and sloppy and it stops right here and right now or heads are going to roll.
"I

Comment: Re:C++ wins the day again. (Score 2) 87

by Kjella (#47406191) Attached to: KDE Releases Frameworks 5

KDE and Qt are synonymous with C++. They prove that C++ is the best language around

LOL, the only reason C++ is tolerable is Qt and only if you avoid screwing with resources yourself and let QObjects handle the mess, it's still full of leftover ugly from the 70s that neither Java, C# nor Swift choose to handle the same way. The problem is that creating a good language, a good compiler and a comprehensive system library (practically a must today IMO) is a huge job and without a big company like Sun/Oracle (Java), Microsoft (C#) or Apple (Swift) backing it you'll never get off the ground.

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Journal: Mars, Ho! Chapter Twenty Seven 2

Journal by mcgrew

Ease
I guess Destiny had stayed up and read or something. I woke up about six, started coffee and was glad the robots were almost as good at cooking as they were bad at making coffee. Unless it had to do with barbecue sauce, and who has barbecue in space? Especially for breakfast?
Or pork, I remembered. I don't eat pork, it's too damned expensive these days and I like beef and chicken better, anyway, but George Wilson, one

Comment: Re:Wait until those lamers find out... (Score 1) 375

You're right about solar panels in that they do take up a metric butt-load of space. As for cleaning them, that is a real problem. If only we had the technology to do that automatically. Maybe some kind of wiper blades attached to an oscillating motor to clear away particulates so that light could pass through a transparent medium designed to shield the panels from the wind ... Hmmm ... What technology could we possibly posses that would accomplish this feat of engineering?

If only it was that easy. You see, sand and all sorts of sharp particles have a tendency of scratching things and solar panels are very easy to scratch. The kinds of wipers they use on cars would quickly result in severe deterioration in the panels' effectiveness. If it was that easy then why do you think they don't already use that? There are plenty of companies like e.g. http://www.solarfarmcleaning.c... that are specifically aimed at providing high-quality cleaning-services and you can just google "solar farm cleaning" to find dozens more.

I am not now, nor have I ever been, a member of the demigodic party. -- Dennis Ritchie

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