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Comment: Re:Listen to Sales - as hard as it may be (Score 2) 158

by sphealey (#48015293) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Software Issue Tracking Transparency - Good Or Bad?

I guess you only buy bug-free software, then.

I think what sphealey was saying is that, if a vendor say "you don't want to see our 'dirty laundry'" or something like that, then that vendor is an immediate no-go.

It isn't about bug-free software, it is about making sure you avoid vendors that may try to deliberately hide/ignore bugs.

Spot-on AC.

Comment: Re:They are just lazy (Score 1) 158

by sphealey (#48014845) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Software Issue Tracking Transparency - Good Or Bad?

I had a software vendor once that had an odd bug in its telephone system: when a support person would put you on hold it would occasionally transfer you into conference with the technician's queue. You know what really, really angers a customer? Being told for the third time by second-level support that he is closing your case as "can't reproduce/no other customers reported/not a bug" and then being put into an impromptu conference call with two other customers waiting to speak to the 2nd level developer about the very same bug - each for more than the 1st time. Makes the user conference a bit uncomfortable for the support group as well.

Comment: Re:Advertise it as a positive thing (Score 1) 158

by sphealey (#48014815) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Software Issue Tracking Transparency - Good Or Bad?

ASK (of MANMAN fame - predecessor of 80% of the ERP products on the market today), Novell, and several of the large networking vendors of the 1990-2005 period were all organizations that openly published their bug lists to the world during their growth phases. It was the restriction of those lists that signaled to their customers and the market that it was time to be careful, not their original existence.

sPh

Yes, I know: I'm sure none of the above published 100% of their non-security bugs. But it was clear to any experienced manager of those technologies that a very large percentage were publicly acknowledged.

Comment: Re:Sanitizing comments, trolls, first to market (Score 1) 158

by sphealey (#48014781) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Software Issue Tracking Transparency - Good Or Bad?

- - - - - What about the trolls who will say "hey this has been filed for X years and still nobody fucking fixes it!?? FAIL!!" Who needs that kind of drama in a bug db. - - - - -

Not to sound all cluetrainy, but this isn't 1995 any more. There are plenty of open uncensored forums and mailing lists where your customers are discussing your product, especially its bugs, and which prospective customers are researching prior to making a decision. Is it better to have the bug acknowledged, perhaps with a brief explanation of why it won't be scheduled for a few more years and a workaround, or your better customers knifing you in the back on mailing lists?

sPh

Comment: Re:Brilliant. Got to prioritize... (Score 1) 50

by mellon (#48001237) Attached to: FAA Clears Movie and TV Drones For Takeoff

You're seriously worried that a drone is going to somehow fly up to 30k feet and hit a jet? Do you know how hard it is to get a non-jet-powered airplane up that high? How hard it would be to get that airplane with a maximum speed of 100mph to collide with a jet moving at ~500mph? When did we Americans turn into such lily-livered cowards? You are jumping at shadows.

Comment: Good summary (Score 1) 391

by sphealey (#47985893) Attached to: Emails Cast Unflattering Light On Internal Politics of Healthcare.gov Rollout

Good summary by Ezra Klein, who has been tracking health care reform since at least 2008:

In conservative media, Obamacare is a disaster. In the real world, it’s working.

"On the whole, though, costs are lower than expected, enrollment is higher than expected, the number of insurers participating in the exchanges is increasing, and more states are joining the Medicaid expansion. Millions of people have insurance who didn't have it before. The law is working. But a lot of the people who are convinced Obamacare is a disaster will never know that, because the voices they trust will never tell them"

Comment: Re:Maybe (Score 1) 252

by sphealey (#47973467) Attached to: Do Specs Matter Anymore For the Average Smartphone User?

OK, perhaps I should qualify that with "assuming the camera has a decent quality sensor". Although since Apple and Samsung do, that seems a bit redundant for a discussion about spec warriors. If someone is going to claim that their Nogood Phone Ltd QLX8732 with the 897MP sensor that produces images worse than 110 film is competing with the 5S and the S5 then I can't help them.

The fundamental point being that 98% of photos taken today are only ever seen on Facebook or similar, and those services downsample images to 0.25 - 1.2 MP at most. Start with a good quality 8MP image, crop it to 6MP, submit it to Facebook as a "high quality image" and you're down to 1.2MP. But even if you want to make prints 6MP generates an excellent quality 5x7 and a good quality 8x10 for all ordinary people.

sPh

Comment: Re:Maybe (Score 1) 252

by sphealey (#47972771) Attached to: Do Specs Matter Anymore For the Average Smartphone User?

- - - - - Cameras are good enough for most people, but some are faster than others and have things like optical stabilization and batter automatic settings / post processing. As far as performance helps this stuff, it matters. - - - - -

That's true, but note that the spec war arguments tend to focus on megapixels. Which beyond 8MP is totally irrelevant to anyone except a professional photographer, but the frothing over "mine has more MP than yours" is intense.

sPh

Comment: Spec warriors and the A7 (Score 1) 252

by sphealey (#47972679) Attached to: Do Specs Matter Anymore For the Average Smartphone User?

I couldn't help but notice the most adamant spec warriors in my group carefully avoided the topic of Apple's A7 processor when it was released. Whatever one things of Apple's design and pricing schemes the A7 was notable achievement that advanced specs in a direction unexpected by its competitors and which really hasn't been equaled to date. Yet for some reason it wasn't discussed.

Leads me to believe that there is something else involved in the chest pounding contest besides straightforward performance measures...

sPh

Comment: Re:Kickstarter's top projects (Score 1) 203

by sphealey (#47965407) Attached to: Kickstarter Lays Down New Rules For When a Project Fails

The first link was to top projects, which is of interest.

The second link claimed "most successful", but was listed in descending amount of dollars raised starting around $12,000,000 (million). If that's the author's definition of 'successful', great. The indie projects I back typically have budgets in the 5-10k range and about 80% of them produce a finished work. Who is to say which is more successful?

sPh

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