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Comment: Re: Maybe, maybe not. (Score 1) 749

by mSparks43 (#47464971) Attached to: Obama Administration Says the World's Servers Are Ours

No.

I mean that The Internet doesn't "exist" in the real world.

It's not a hard, tangable object that can be legislated.

This is different to companies (where for a company to exist in a country it needs to have people in that country)

Now they can try - and they will have small "wins". a few insignificant number of people will have a hard time, a few others will comply with the legislation.

But in the whole any legislation can have no more impact on what people do on the internet than an ISP trying to block thepiratebay.

In fact, TPB and wikileaks are perfect examples.

The entire weight of the western worlds governments thrown behind trying to shut them down and negligable impact - even in their own borders - at best.

Comment: Re:Sorry, destruction is not proof of claim (Score 1) 269

Yes, being honest (snowdens means) should clearly be a criminal offence, and is a terrible way to do business..
Freedom is slavery and all that.

For all those saying "nothing will be done".
Loosing this court case will almost certainly lose the NSA their budget.
And by destroying evidence they took one giant leap towards loosing the case.

Comment: Re:How about the build tools and the OS? (Score 1) 131

by mSparks43 (#47161121) Attached to: TrueCrypt Cryptanalysis To Include Crowdsourcing Aspect

It's perfectly sane if you're the NSA or affiliated with them, not so sane if you are using products they've tampered with.

The point with the compile chain/tool, is the compiler can be modified to build in exactly that kind of feature (there's an example from bell I think that did something very similar, since C compilers are compiled by previous version of themselves).

Its far more ubiquitious than it should be, for example these guys
http://www.phoenixintelligence...
Have a ton of hardware installed at microsoft, analysing everything that goes through microsofts servers.

It wouldn't be so much of a problem, if they hadn't re-engineered themselves into industrial espionage.

Comment: Re:How about the build tools and the OS? (Score 1) 131

by mSparks43 (#47158381) Attached to: TrueCrypt Cryptanalysis To Include Crowdsourcing Aspect

I'm not sure you understood me correctly.
You create an encrypted container using the password "superstrongnoonecanaccesspassword".

then your container has put into it "thiscontainerspassword="superstrongnoonecanaccesspassword""
encrypted with
AllTheFedsHaveThisDecryptKey.

Like Bitlocker.

Comment: Re:How about the build tools and the OS? (Score 1) 131

by mSparks43 (#47149893) Attached to: TrueCrypt Cryptanalysis To Include Crowdsourcing Aspect

Actually, this isn't true.
Because encrypted container that contains "weak" encryption wont be able to be decrypted by a build that doesn't have the same weakness.

It's also the reason bitlocker isn't a replacement - I cant use bitlocker on linux, I use truecrypt containers to store stuff in the cloud, and access from a variety of machines.

what it really needs is some tidying up, forget about whole disk encryption, and concentrate on making sure the install is safe from tampering.

Comment: Re:The explanation is simple (Score 1) 245

It was an unintended consequence of the top secret "suitcase nukes" held in the planes that caused the towers to collapse.

(roughly equivalent to 2KTn's of tnt, you can see that on the seismographs just before the buildings collapse)

These cool little bastards release their entire payload as electrical energy (causing steal supports to pretty much vapourise) and have very low residual radiation (low levels of alpha particles, no harmfull to anyone except those who come in direct contact with the debris)

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