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Comment: Maybe it's the weightlessness (Score 1) 47

Your having been to space is no guarantee that you're not crap-on-the-floor looney.

I would have thought that we've learned better than to pay too much attention to former astronauts. They might well be right about the asteroids, but I still think we should go ahead and get a second opinion on this.

Comment: Re:How's your Russian? (Score 1) 265

by PopeRatzo (#46796657) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Hungry Students, How Common?

That U.S. crotch you're cheerfully kicking might not be able to bail out your "actual civilized" buttocks from the next war.

I'm pretty sure Europeans are more worried about the US starting the next war.

The thing Europeans like best about the US military is all the coin we drop having bases there. Unless you count Serbia, where the US military is about as welcome as a bladder infection.

Comment: Re:Technically if an NSA backdoor existed (Score 1) 171

by PopeRatzo (#46760577) Attached to: First Phase of TrueCrypt Audit Turns Up No Backdoors

Thanks for the info. That's what I'd assumed, and hoped.

So I'm not sure where this idea that these audits are "American only" or that there is something preventing someone from pointing out a vulnerability comes from.

Generally, I trust stuff that has lots of eyes on it.

Comment: Re:there are also a shitload more f2p games that d (Score 1) 245

by PopeRatzo (#46752627) Attached to: PC Gaming Alive and Dominant

That did what? Not suck? Can you give us a list of 10 F2P games that did not suck and not include DOTA2?

And how much lower is the bar for F2P and why? Clearly, the teams making these games are trying to make money, and if they believe they can make money, apparently there is some value to having people play these games?

So what exactly is "free" as in "free to play"? Ain't nothing free.

Comment: Re:Technically if an NSA backdoor existed (Score 1) 171

by PopeRatzo (#46752601) Attached to: First Phase of TrueCrypt Audit Turns Up No Backdoors

The code is being audited in America.

Is there something preventing an audit elsewhere? Is it illegal to send the source code overseas? And how are these audits done? There aren't a lot of details in TFA. Is it like a big Wiki where anybody can look at the code and report what they find, or are the auditors vetted with specific sections assigned them?

I'm asking seriously. I'm not a developer, so I don't know. But I worry about security and snooping.

Comment: Re:Not True (Score 1) 245

by PopeRatzo (#46743639) Attached to: PC Gaming Alive and Dominant

If you fail to deliver on your promised, you won't be able to easily earn back people's trust

So the next kickstarter campaign is in your girlfriend's name.

Do you want me to find examples of people who have gone back to the kickstarter well and never really delivered?

Incidentally, although I'm an indie developer (as one would define it),

Great. Then maybe you can explain why it seems impossible for new companies to produce something at the level of Half-Life, the Burnout series, etc etc. Games that people want to put over 100 hours into. Valve and Criterion were relatively small and little-known "indie" companies when those games were made. Why do game developers seem so allergic to giving good value for the price of their game. And why do so many have such low opinions of their own games that they go F2P? Are there no developers who realize just how badly that genre sucks?

Comment: Re:Not True (Score 1) 245

by PopeRatzo (#46743587) Attached to: PC Gaming Alive and Dominant

If it doesn't work out, like the patron of olde, I'm not spending money I can't afford to spend

The "patrons of old" generally gave commissions, which the artist was expected to fulfill. And if they didn't, they'd get away with it once.

Kickstarter has become the go-to charity for game devs on their third, fourth and fifth go-round. You'd think at some point, they'd be able to get someone to pay them for their work, instead of for their promises.

It's not just "starving artists" at kickstarter, either. You'll see a lot of well-known developers with their hands out, because it's easier to promise to pay on Tuesday for a hamburger today than it is to sign a contract, where you are required to perform.

"Patron of olde" sounds a lot like sucker to me, but as you say, you're not spending money you can't afford to, um, lose.

You realize that there are ways to support "starving artists" where you actually get something? You ever think maybe there's a reason they're starving?

I don't know about you, but I'm in my 28th year of living off my own intellectual property. There are plenty of artists who actually have held down jobs in order to support their work, or got commissions (I've done both) or even (gasp!) sold stock. Roberto Rodriquez participated in medical experiments to finance his first movie. At least there is a shred of self-respect in those methods, and a higher likelihood that the artist will actually accomplish something besides making a snappy trailer for a game that will never, ever be finished.

Comment: Re:Art style for a small team (Score 1) 245

by PopeRatzo (#46739715) Attached to: PC Gaming Alive and Dominant

what other graphical style is practical for a small team seeking to build a portfolio?

Most artists don't expect anyone to actually pay money for their portfolio.

I am well-acquainted with possibilities for artists. The notion that step #1 is, "asking people to pay, no strings attached for what you haven't made" when you haven't made anything yet is relatively recent.

If you want money to build something, then the people who invest should be in for a cut of the profits.

"If you want to eat hippopatomus, you've got to pay the freight." -- attributed to an IBM guy, about why IBM software uses so much memory

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