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Submission + - AT&T residential to go NAT (networkworld.com)

Chang writes: AT&T is planning to move residential users to carrier grade NAT as part of their IPv6 rollout.

AT&T says it is not going to adopt dual-stack mode – where native IPv6 and IPv4 services run side-by side – for its residential customers "We're going into address conservation mode, which is the guidance of [the American Registry for Internet Numbers],'' Fitzsimmons says. "We're stemming the consumption of IPv4 addresses for both our enterprise customers and any customers paying for static IP addresses. For the gross majority of our customers, as they go through IPv6 testing and trials, the majority of our customers will take advantage of carrier-grade NAT."


Submission + - Aussie kids foil finger scanner with Gummi Bears (zdnet.com.au) 4

mask.of.sanity writes: An Australian high school has installed "secure" fingerprint scanners for roll call for senior students, which savvy kids may be able to circumvent with sweets from their lunch box. The system replaces the school's traditional sign-in system with biometric readers that require senior students to have their fingerprints read to verify attendance.

The school principal says the system is better than swipe cards because it stops truant kids getting their mates to sign-in for them. But using the Gummi Bear attack, students can make replicas of their own fingerprints from gelatine, the ingredient in Gummi Bears, to forge a replica finger. The attack worked against a bunch of scanners that detect electrical charges within the human body, since gelatine has virtually the same capacitance as a finger's skin.

A litany of fingerprint scanners have fallen victim to bypass methods, many of which are explained publicly in detail on the internet.


Submission + - Privacy Fail: How Facebook steals phone numbers (kurtvonmoos.com)

An anonymous reader writes: In early January, Facebook updated their iPhone app to include a Contact Sync feature. In a nutshell, “Facebook Contact Sync” allows you to synchronize your friends’ latest Facebook profile pictures with the matching contact entry in your mobile phone’s address book. Due to “Terms of Service Issues” however, Facebook does not sync your friends email addresses or phone numbers (listed on their Facebook profile) TO your phone.

Ironically, what Facebook WILL DO, with neither your knowledge or consent, is import ALL the names and phone numbers FROM your phone’s address book and upload them to your Facebook Phonebook app on Facebook.com, thus storing your private contact numbers on Facebook’s servers. Once your phone is synced , Facebook will attempt to match the newly uploaded phone numbers to users that have listed the same phone number on their Facebook profile, wether you are friends with them or not. If Facebook cannot make a match, it will create a new contact entry in your Facebook Phonebook using the contact details imported from your phone, and add a link to invite them to join Facebook. And guess what? There is no way to delete the names and numbers Facebook imports from your phone’s address book.

Submission + - iPhone Owners Smashing Device to Get Upgrade (tomsguide.com)

markass530 writes: "An iPhone insurance carrier says that four in six claims are suspicious, and is worse when a new model appears on the market.


Supercover Insurance is alleging that many iPhone owners are deliberately smashing their devices and filing false claims in order to upgrade to the latest model. The gadget insurance company told Sky News Sunday that it saw a 50-percent rise in claims during the month Apple launched the latest version, the iPhone 3GS."


Submission + - Facebook Founder's Pictures Go Public (yahoo.com) 2

jamie writes: "In a not-uncommon development for the social-networking leader, Facebook's recently released privacy controls are leaving the company a bit red-faced. As a result of a new policy that by default makes users' profiles, photos and friends lists available on the web, almost 300 personal photos of founder Mark Zuckerberg became publicly available, a development that had gossip sites like Gawker yukking it up.

related story"

Submission + - Hollywood Sets $10 Billion Box Office Record (torrentfreak.com)

kamikazearun writes: Claims by the MPAA that illegal downloads are killing the industry and causing billions in losses are once again being shredded. In 2009, the leading Hollywood studios made more films and generated more revenue than ever before, and for the first time in history the domestic box office grosses will surpass $10 billion.

Submission + - Laptop fire kills five

An anonymous reader writes: Folks, be careful if you leave your laptop charging overnight. Authorities have determined that a fatal fire in Staffanstorp, Sweden, three months ago was likely caused by an overheating laptop battery. Apparently, the vents were blocked by a blanket which eventually caught fire. A mother and her four children perished in the blaze. Translated story here. (Before you bring up the Darwin Award, please consider the age of the likely culprit: nine years.)

Submission + - Is Your Web Site Green?

rjnagle writes: Here's a two part story I wrote on "Is your website green?" Part One examines the challenges of trying to estimate the carbon footprint of a webhosting service or a data center. Part Two examines how data centers try to improve their energy efficiency and whether the new Energy Star rating system for data centers (due April 2010) will change things. Some questions raised here include: 1)should businesses ask for PUE ratings from data centers before they use their services?, 2)how confident can businesses be about the numbers provided from data centers? and 3)is an Energy Star rating system helpful if it doesn't take into account a data center's overall carbon footprint?

Submission + - FreeBSD 8.0 Released 1

An anonymous reader writes: The FreeBSD Release Engineering Team is pleased to announce the availability of FreeBSD 8 stable release. Some of the highlights: Xen DomU support, network stack virtualization, stack-smashing protection, TTY layer rewrite, much improved ZFS v13, a new USB stack, multicast updates including IGMPv3, vimage — a new virtualization container, Fedora 10 Linux binary compatibility to run Linux software such as Flash 10 and others, trusted BSD MAC (Mandatory Access Control), and rewritten NFS client/server introducing NFSv4. Inclusion of improved device mmap() extensions will allow the technical implementation of a 64-bit Nvidia display driver for the x86-64 platform. The GNOME desktop environment has been upgraded to 2.26.3, KDE to 4.3.1, and Firefox to 3.5.5.

There is also an in-depth look at the new features and major architectural changes in FreeBSD 8.0, including a screenshot tour, upgrade instructions are posted here.

You can grab the latest version from FreeBSD from the mirrors (main ftp server) or via BitTorrent. Please consider making a donation and help us to spread the word by tweeting and blogging about the drive and release.

Submission + - Palm Pre users suffer cloud computing data loss (appleinsider.com)

DECS writes: Palm Pre users have been hit by a new cloud sync failure resulting in lost contacts, calendar items, notes and tasks, which now means that virtually every major smartphone vendor has suffered significant cloud problems: Apple's MobileMe last year, Nokia's Ovi and Microsoft's Danger/Sidekick this year, and additional rolling outages suffered by BlackBerry and Google users. Will vendors dial back cloud-only sync, or at least begin providing more robust local sync and restore features along the lines of the iPhone's iTunes sync? Windows Mobile and Android are still pursuing designs that, like the Pre, expected users to fully rely on central cloud servers rather than defaulting to a local backup option.

Submission + - IBM discontinuing Cell processor (hpcwire.com)

toxygen01 writes: German website Heise Online has received confirmation (english translation) that IBM is terminating its Cell processor line. This means that no future development will take place, making the PoweXCell 8i the last Cell processor. Parts of the Cell project will still make it into future processor designs, however.

Seals Face Assault Charges After Terrorist Capture 23

Three Navy SEALs are facing assault charges after the capture of one of the most wanted terrorists in Iraq, Ahmed Hashim Abed. Abed is believed to have organized the murder and mutilation of four Blackwater USA security guards in Fallujah. The accused terrorist, who had a bloody lip, claims that he was punched in the face and not giving a foot massage, or allowed to listen to his iPod as one might expect when a SEAL team captures you. The SEALs have requested a trial by court-martial.

Submission + - IMMDb Turns 19 (techcrunch.com)

emeraldd writes: I'd say this is a birthday worth remembering:
"If you load up the Internet Movie Database (IMDb) today, you'll see a new logo commemorating its 19th birthday. Yes, that's really old for the Internet. Google, by comparison, is 11. Meanwhile, Yahoo is 14. IMDb is so old in fact, that is pre-dates the first web browsers."

Submission + - Firefox Prompts to Disable Microsoft .NET Addon

ZosX writes: "Around 11:45 PM (Eastern time for those that care), I was prompted by Firefox that it had disabled the addons that Microsoft includes with .NET. Specifically the .NET Framework Assistant and the Windows Presentation Foundation. Citing that the "following addons have been known to cause stability or security issues with Firefox." Thanks mozilla team for hitting the kill switch and hopefully this will get Microsoft to release a patch sooner for the millions of poor souls that are too unfortunate to be aware of faster, more secure alternatives to their precious Internet Explorer. (Is it possible to troll for IE apologists on slashdot?)"

Submission + - Ruby hacker and artist "_why" is no more. (ejohn.org) 1

anshul writes: ""why the lucky stiff" (often known simply as why, _why) has disappeared. All his known online accounts, websites and repositories have been deleted. It is not yet known whether _why deleted these himself or if his machine was hacked.

_why is a prolific writer, cartoonist, musician, artist and computer programmer who is most famous for his many significant contributions in Ruby like the Poignant guide, Hackety hack, shoes, Syck . He used to closely guard his anonymity and his sudden disappearance has caused a lot of disturbance in the Ruby community. This is a sad day for most Ruby coders."

Yes, we will be going to OSI, Mars, and Pluto, but not necessarily in that order. -- Jeffrey Honig