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Comment: Web apps vs. desktop apps (Score 1) 218

by qbzzt (#49564833) Attached to: JavaScript Devs: Is It Still Worth Learning jQuery?

If you develop a native app people will use everywhere, you probably need these version:

1. Windows
2. Linux
3. iOS
4. Android

And then you need to convince people to download and install your software, because it is not malicious. OTOH, with a web app they just need a browser.

Native apps may be a better solution when you are doing a custom application for a specific business, and all their employees have Windows desktops or laptops.

Comment: Re:Is IBM a real cloud hosting competitor? (Score 2) 29

by qbzzt (#49025743) Attached to: Microsoft To Offer Azure Credits To Compete With IBM, AWS

IBM recently bought SoftLayer, and is now offering a cloud with a bunch of additional enterprise services at https://console.ng.bluemix.net... .

Required disclaimer: While I am an IBM employee, my opinions are my own and do not represent the IBM corporation. In fact, being a publicly traded corporation, I don't think IBM can have opinions other than "it is good to fulfill one's fiduciary duties".

Comment: Big mistake (Score 1) 259

by Tracy Reed (#48992977) Attached to: Washington May Count CS As Foreign Language For College Admission

As someone who has learned both spoken languages and programming languages to fluency (whatever that might mean in this case) I can tell you that allowing CS to replace the requirement for 2 years of a spoken foreign language is a huge mistake. As if we don't have enough narrow minded jingoistic Americans running about scarcely aware of the cultures outside our borders. If you want a good IT job learn both. It is entirely possible. I took two years of both in high school, no problem. You may have to give up your goof-off elective for a couple semesters but it is certainly doable in most schools.

Cloud

Don't Be a Server Hugger! (Video) 409

Posted by Roblimo
from the old-stewball-was-the-most-loyal-server-horse-we-ever-done-had dept.
Curtis Peterson says admins who hang onto their servers instead of moving into the cloud are 'Server Huggers,' a term he makes sound like 'Horse Huggers,' a phrase that once might have been used to describe hackney drivers who didn't want to give up their horse-pulled carriages in favor of gasoline-powered automobiles. Curtis is VP of Operations for RingCentral, a cloud-based VOIP company, so he's obviously made the jump to the cloud himself. And he has reassuring words for sysadmins who are afraid the move to cloud-based computing is going to throw them out of work. He says there are plenty of new cloud computing opportunities springing up for those who have enough initiative and savvy to grab onto them, by which he obviously means you, right?
Math

Brain Injury Turns Man Into Math Genius 208

Posted by Soulskill
from the ace-your-exam-in-one-easy-step dept.
mpicpp sends in the story of Jason Padgett, a man who developed extraordinary mathematical abilities as the result of brain trauma when he was attacked outside a bar. "Padgett, a furniture salesman from Tacoma, Wash., who had very little interest in academics, developed the ability to visualize complex mathematical objects and physics concepts intuitively. The injury, while devastating, seems to have unlocked part of his brain that makes everything in his world appear to have a mathematical structure 'I see shapes and angles everywhere in real life' — from the geometry of a rainbow, to the fractals in water spiraling down a drain, Padgett told Live Science." "He describes his vision as 'discrete picture frames with a line connecting them, but still at real speed.' If you think of vision as the brain taking pictures all the time and smoothing them into a video, it's as though Padgett sees the frames without the smoothing. "

Practical people would be more practical if they would take a little more time for dreaming. -- J. P. McEvoy

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