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Comment: Be engaging (Score 4, Insightful) 218

by loupgarou21 (#46551727) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Re-Learning How To Interview As a Developer?

I typically get job offers from almost all of my in-person interviews. What works for me is being very engaging in the interview. Appear genuinely interested in the company. Don't wait for the "do you have any questions for us" part of the interview before asking questions, ask questions throughout the entire interview. Ask questions about the corporate culture, ask questions about their internal workflow, ask questions about parts of the company other than the one you'll be working in.

Also, come off as very human during the interview, especially when they ask you about yourself. When they ask you about yourself, don't just rehash your resume, they can read that for themselves. Instead, talk about your interests, your hobbies, your life. "Well, I've been a programmer for 13 years, I have a BS in computer science from the U of M, I've been married for 3 years, I play softball and pain miniatures."

The interview is way less about them gauging your technical ability, and way more about showing your interest in the company and how you will fit in with their current team.

Yes, be prepared for the technical questions too, but that's really the minor stuff

Comment: Re:Aliens (Score 2) 89

by loupgarou21 (#40489793) Attached to: Book Review: Permanent Emergency

A problem we're actually seeing in Minnesota. We have "tornado sirens". I put it in quotes because there is no actual standard for when they're sounded other than for a monthly test at 1pm on the first wednesday of the month.

Some jurisdictions sound them at the drop of the hat, when there isn't necessarily a tornado, but when the weather is bad enough where it *might* cause some damage. Others wait until an actual tornado is pretty much on top of you before sounding the sirens.

This, along with the monthly testing, has caused issues where people have been seriously injured or killed because they ignored the sirens because they assumed it was just another siren going off when nothing serious was actually happening.

Comment: metal utensiles, including knives (Score 3, Insightful) 472

I find it refreshing that she's given actual, metal utensils, including a knife.

I'm 30 now, so you can use that for a frame of reference. Back in elementary school, we were also given metal utensils, including knives. somewhere around middle school/high school (I think it was when I was entering high school), Minnesota passed a zero tolerance knife policy for the grade schools. Now, even a butter knife would get you immediately expelled from school, the cafeteria switched to plastic-ware and no longer had even plastic knives.

I'm glad to see that not everyone is insane.

Comment: Re:LOL (Score 1) 1165

by loupgarou21 (#40318213) Attached to: Blocking Gun Laws With Patents

from my understanding of the current micro-engraving technology, you wouldn't even have to incriminate yourself by buying a file. The engraving wares off fairly quickly through normal use. Just go to the gun range and practice shooting. A thousand rounds later and the numbers punched by the firing pin will be unreadable.

Comment: Re:Poor analysis - its film not the camera itself (Score 1) 309

by loupgarou21 (#38637306) Attached to: Kodak Failing, But Camera Phones Not To Blame

The thing I think is funny about Polaroid is that they closed down the instant film portion of their business when it was becoming more profitable again (there is/was a resurgence in popularity of instant photography in the last few years) so they could focus solely on rebranded electronics.

They were also working on a DVR/video streaming device in-house about 4 or 5 years ago, but I believe that was the only thing they were actually developing themselves, everything else was shitty electronics developed by other companies and sticking their own name on them (and I really do mean shitty, some of the stuff had as high as a 50% warranty rate.)

Comment: A better question is "Why bother upgrading?" (Score 2) 879

by loupgarou21 (#38578252) Attached to: What's Keeping You On XP?

The applications I want to use work fine in XP.
There are no features in Windows 7 that are compelling to me.
Still getting security updates for now
What's that, there are unpatched security flaws in XP with exploits in the wild? Eh, my network is reasonably secure, I have some decent anti-malware running on my computer, and I honestly don't use my XP computer to browse the web all that often.

The only reason I ever upgraded from win2k to XP was because some software I wanted to run wasn't win2k compatible. That's probably the point at which I'll upgrade away from XP as well.

Comment: Re:Sorry, but MY calendar is WAY better (Score 2) 725

by loupgarou21 (#38514046) Attached to: Christmas Always On Sunday? Researchers Propose New Calendar

why does no one ever think of a calendar with 13, 28 day months? Everyone tries to cram it all into 12 months for some reason. My calendar gives you 364 days in a year, which would still need to be corrected by a single non-month day (or have the day tacked onto one of the months.) That makes 4, 7 day weeks to a month.

If you keep that extra day apart from other months, it could be a permanent holiday, we'll call it splorchday or something equally silly.

Comment: Re:Not to take sides (Score 1) 1003

by loupgarou21 (#38405690) Attached to: Why the NTSB Is Wrong About Cellphones

In truth, I meant to write "most people" not just "people". I didn't notice my mistake until after I submitted.

Most people can single out individual voices when there are many around, and babies tend to develop this ability about 2 months after birth. It's called source separation, and a minority of people are unable to do so properly. It's actually especially difficult for people with hearing aids, and there is a lot of research going into hearing aids that regain people's ability to properly perform source separation.

So, there you go, it's just one more thing that makes you special. Granted, in this case, what makes you special is actually a slight handicap. But knowing you have this difference from most people can help you deal with it better by understanding why some people can understand you fine in a crowded room, but you have trouble understanding them.

Comment: Re:Not to take sides (Score 1) 1003

by loupgarou21 (#38389734) Attached to: Why the NTSB Is Wrong About Cellphones

FWIW, Mythbusters tested it.

...

Talking on a cellphone while driving is as dangerous as drunk driving: confirmed

I had an issue with the testing on this. They were requiring the people driving to perform difficult mental tasks while driving and talking on the cell phone.

Any time I talk on the cell phone, if it turns into something where I need to think hard about it, I apologize to the person I'm talking to to and tell them I'll have to call them back with an answer to their question as I'm driving.

Talking about simple things while driving is a lot less distracting than performing mental gymnastics.

Comment: Re:Sorry, it's 50/50, period. (Score 1) 981

by loupgarou21 (#32729924) Attached to: The Tuesday Birthday Problem

This is where it gets so ambiguous and well... stupid really. At one point in the article they mention that the numbers change depending on why the son born on tuesday was mentioned, as in, "I'm incredibly stupid and live my life based on a set of arbitrary rules, and I'll only mention the gender of one of my children if it is a boy that was born on a tuesday, but otherwise wouldn't tell you anything other than the number of children."

So in that instance, the biological probability isn't the only thing taken into account, but the motivation to tell you the gender and day are taken into account as well.

There are never any bugs you haven't found yet.

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