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Comment: Re:Intended Reaction? (Score 1) 724

by lortho (#34319006) Attached to: <em>Witcher 2</em> Torrents Could Net You a Fine
This theory doesn't match the evidence in this case, though. Piracy has skyrocketed over the years, but the gaming industry has shown no signs of approaching anything near a situation where it's "no longer tenable to make games and no one has a game to play." On the contrary, it's gotten bigger and bigger as well. Even in this age where thousands and thousands of both legally and illegally free games exist for all sorts of different platforms, big titles like CoD Black Ops are seeing record sales. There's very clearly something about the economics of this situation that the old theories and models are missing.

Comment: Re:Unrelated? The PDFs are the same! (Score 5, Informative) 131

by lortho (#33308116) Attached to: Root Privileges Through Linux Kernel Bug
It's because both articles are actually about the Wojtczuk report, and they both mis-quote Joanna Rutkowska as stating the bug is related to Spengler's X-Server flaw. She clarifies in an update to H-Online's version of the article that she was misunderstood and that they are actually unrelated.
It's funny.  Laugh.

Fark Creator Slams 'the Wisdom of Crowds' 507

Posted by timothy
from the respond-below-with-wit-and-vigor dept.
GovTechGuy writes with some harsh words from Fark.com founder Drew Curtis, speaking at a conference Tuesday in Washington, DC: "'The "wisdom of the crowds" is the most ridiculous statement I've heard in my life. Crowds are dumb,' Curtis said. 'It takes people to move crowds in the right direction, crowds by themselves just stand around and mutter.' Curtis pointed to his own experience moderating comments on Fark, which allows users to give their often humorous take on the news of the day. He said only one percent of Web comments have any value and called the rest 'garbage.' Another example Curtis pointed to is the America Speaking Out website recently launched by House Republicans to allow the public to weigh in on the issues and vote for policy positions they support. Curtis called the site an 'absolute train wreck.' 'It's an absolute disaster. It's impossible to tell who was kidding and who wasn't,' Curtis said."
The Almighty Buck

$33 Million In Poker Winnings Seized By US Govt 465

Posted by samzenpus
from the mine-now-I-take-it dept.
An anonymous reader writes "A New York Times story reports that, 'Opening a new front in the government's battle against Internet gambling, federal prosecutors have asked four American banks to freeze tens of millions of dollars in payments owed to people who play poker online. ... "It's very aggressive, and I think it's a gamble on the part of the prosecutors," Mr. Rose said. He added that it was not clear what law would cover the seizure of money belonging to poker players, as opposed to the money of the companies involved.' Many players are reporting that their cashout checks have bounced."
The Internet

The Perils of Pop Philosophy 484

Posted by kdawson
from the bloggers-beware dept.
ThousandStars tips a new piece by Julian Sanchez, the guy who, in case you missed it, brought us a succinct definition of the one-way hash argument (of the type often employed in the US culture wars). This one is about the dangers of a certain kind of oversimplifying, as practiced routinely by journalists and bloggers. "This brings us around to some of my longstanding ambivalence about blogging and journalism more generally. On the one hand, while it's probably not enormously important whether most people have a handle on the mind-body problem, a democracy can't make ethics and political philosophy the exclusive province of cloistered academics. On the other hand, I look at the online public sphere and too often tend to find myself thinking: 'Discourse at this level can't possibly accomplish anything beyond giving people some simulation of justification for what they wanted to believe in the first place.' This is, needless to say, not a problem limited to philosophy."
Television

+ - "You Don't Understand Our Audience"->

Submitted by
MBCook
MBCook writes "Technology Review has a fantastic seven page piece titled "You Don't Understand Our Audience" (printer version, summed up by Ars) by former Dateline correspondent John Hockenberry. In it he discusses how NBC (and the networks at large) has missed and wasted opportunities brought by the Internet; and how they work to hard to get viewers at the expense of actual news. The story describes various events such as turning down a report on who al-Qaeda is for a reality show about firefighters, having to tie a story about a radical student group into American Dreams, and the failure to cover events like Kurt Cobain suicide (except as an Andy Rooney complaint piece)."
Link to Original Source
It's funny.  Laugh.

+ - Stallman Attacked by Ninjas->

Submitted by vivIsel
vivIsel (450550) writes "When RMS took the stage to address the Yale Political Union, Yale's venerable parliamentary debate society, it was already an unusual speech: instead of the jacket and tie customary there, he sported a T shirt, and no shoes. But then he was attacked by ninjas. Apparently some students took it into their head to duplicate an XKCD webcomic before a live audience — luckily, though, Stallman didn't resort to violence. Instead, he delivered an excellent speech about DRM."
Link to Original Source
Space

+ - Astronomers Find Mysterious Radio Burst->

Submitted by
RJ
RJ writes ""The single, short-lived blast of radio waves likely occurred some 3 billion light-years from Earth, and it may signal a cosmic car crash of two neutron stars, the death throes of a black hole — or something else.."

"This is something that's completely unprecedented,"

"We're confused and excited, but it could open up a whole new research field,"

".....are predicted to let loose gravity waves that Einstein's theory of relativity predicts, but the phenomenon has never been directly observed...."

(( I don't have time to write an article for this, but feel free to do whatever, just wanted to get this linked! ))"

Link to Original Source
Role Playing (Games)

+ - Dungeons and Dragon's 4th edition->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "http://digital50.com/news/items/BW/2001/07/14/2007 0816005037/dungeons-dragonsr-flashes-4-ward-at-gen -con.html Today Wizards of the Coast confirms that the new edition will launch in May 2008 with the release of the D&D Player's Handbook(R). A pop culture icon, DUNGEONS & DRAGONS is the #1 tabletop roleplaying game in the world and is revered by legions of gamers of all ages. The 4th Edition DUNGEONS & DRAGONS game includes elements familiar to current D&D players, including illustrated rulebooks and pre-painted plastic miniatures. Also releasing next year will be new Web-based tools and online community forums through the brand new DUNGEONS & DRAGONS Insider (D&D Insider(TM)) digital offering. D&D Insider lowers the barriers of entry for new players while simultaneously offering the depth of play that appeals to veteran players."
Link to Original Source
Space

+ - 30 years since the 'Wow!' signal

Submitted by smooth wombat
smooth wombat (796938) writes "Thirty years ago, a signal was received by Ohio State University's Big Ear Radio Observatory which, for a brief moment, set the scientific community ablaze. Had we heard the first proof of an intelligent civilization outside our own?

Unfortunately, the signal was not repeated and has not been heard from since despite the best efforts of astronomers during the last three decades. The debate over what the signal actually was continues to this day but new help is on the way. The SETI institute will soon be using the Allen Telescope Array in California to search the same area of sky. The array uses dozens of separate radio dishes to produce an instrument that will eventually become more sensitive than the world's largest single-dish telescope in Aricebo."
Media (Apple)

+ - AppleWorks/ClarisWorks quietly dies->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "AppleWorks' last breath was masked by last week's iMac, iLife and iWork announcements — Apple has discontinued the product. Apple told resellers of the demise of AppleWorks last week, announcing that the software had reached "End of Life" status. It will no longer be sold. The AppleWorks website now directs users to the iWork section of Apple's website."
Link to Original Source
Hardware Hacking

+ - iPhone Completely Unlocked for $96 with Forged SIM->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "Gizmodo is reporting total unlocking of the iPhone: 'while the wizards are still working on a software-only complete unlock for the iPhone, hackers in Europe claim that they have completely unlocked it, allegedly using a SIM reader/writer and a blank SIM card to obtain full calling and SMS capabilities. Total cost: $96. Read on for the details.' Apparently it has been tested in Europe, but I am ordering my SIM kit now."
Link to Original Source
Businesses

+ - Penalizing for Poor Health 2

Submitted by
theodp
theodp writes "Perhaps laying the groundwork for Sicko II, Clarian Health announced that starting in 2009, it will fine employees $10 per paycheck if their body mass index is over 30. Even slim-and-trim employees have to worry about their cholesterol, blood pressure, and glucose levels — they'll be dinged $5 for each standard they don't meet. Smokers get a sneak preview of the policy starting next year, when they'll find $5 less in each check. Clarian credited new government HIPPAA rules that became effective July 1st for giving it the courage to follow its penalize-for-poor-health convictions."

"In matrimony, to hesitate is sometimes to be saved." -- Butler

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