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Comment Re: Simple (Score 1) 147

Because the emergency dialler requirement is not intended solely for the person who owns the phone. It's expected that any telephone that you pick up (land line or mobile) will work for emergency calls. This is also why landlines can still make emergency calls even if they are nominally disconnected by the phone company.

Comment Re: ZFS is nice... (Score 1) 267

But it's combined by the user at runtime, not by canocal. The GPL allows an end users to do this.

This is a way that people kid themselves about the GPL. If the user were really porting ZFS on their own, combining the work and never distributing it, that would work. But the user isn't combining it. The Ubuntu developer is creating instructions which explicitly load the driver into the kernel. These instructions are either a link script that references the kernel, or a pre-linked dynamic module. Creating those instructions and distributing them to the user is tantamount to performing the act on the user's system, under your control rather than the user's.

To show this with an analogy, suppose you placed a bomb in the user's system which would go off when they loaded the ZFS module. But Judge, you might say, I am innocent because the victim is actually the person who set off the bomb. All I did was distribute a harmless unexploded bomb.

So, it's clear that you can perform actions that have effects later in time and at a different place that are your action rather than the user's. That is what building a dynamic module or linking scripts does.

There is also the problem that the pieces, Linux and ZFS, are probably distributed together. There is specific language in the GPL to catch that.

A lot of people don't realize what they get charged with when they violate the GPL (or any license). They don't get charged with violating the license terms. They are charged with copyright infringement, and their defense is that they have a license. So, the defense has to prove that they were in conformance with every license term.

This is another situation where I would have a pretty easy time making the programmer look bad when they are deposed.

Comment Re: ...uhh (Score 1) 178

But would we recognize the intent? There was this number experiment by Cornelis de Jager who showed that with a handful of numbers and some creative application of math, you can prove that these numbers are "special" and that whoever used them has a profound understanding of math. He used some values derived from his bicycle to show that whoever made this must have superspecial knowledge of quantum physics because if you multiplied the pedal way with the square root of the bell's diameter and divided it by ... you get the idea.

This was done to debunk the number mysticism behind the Pyramids and other ancient buildings where some ancient alien loonies claimed that, since the length of the sides and the height and whatnot can calculate some physical constants down to some numbers behind the comma. de Jager showed that you can pull a handful numbers out of your ass and, putting them through some math, you can calculate any physical constant you want.

That also works for conspiracy theories, btw.

So when you show some alien that you know a constant, you also have to show them that you actually intend to show it to them.

Comment Re:Uh huh. (Score 2, Insightful) 458

And this is what sociopath does; concocts elaborate, vile and usually illegal schemes, convinces a bunch of underlings to execute them, and then, when caught, tries to throw them under the bus.

It's why sociopaths should be outlawed from all management positions of any kind, right down to crew shift chief at McDonald's.

Comment What the bleepin' fuck? (Score 1) 142

No access point on this planet has the potential to actually cause any meaningful interference with anything by a simple change in its firmware. Either you have to tinker with the hardware, attach some serious antennas or otherwise boost its rather mediocre power, but nothing you could do to its software alone could possibly create the alleged interference causing device the FCC seems to fear.

Actually, to create such a thing, all I have to do is modifying the hardware. Something that locking down the software will not even remotely address.

So, spill it. What's the deal? You're lying, FCC. What's the real reason?

Comment Re:16 nm vs 14 nm (Score 3, Insightful) 249

I'm not particularly familiar with either company's process, but it's been a couple of generations since you could actually make meaningful comparisons based on the quoted nm size, because everyone has different smallest features that they measure when deciding that they are Xnm. That said, we passed the end of Dennard scaling a long time ago. You'd expect the same chip to be consuming about as much power, be slightly more able to dissipate the heat. It may also have less leakage, though that depends on a number of other factors.

"Conversion, fastidious Goddess, loves blood better than brick, and feasts most subtly on the human will." -- Virginia Woolf, "Mrs. Dalloway"