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Comment: Re:Any abstract algebra text (Score 1) 630

by localhost00 (#26777645) Attached to: Mathematics Reading List For High School Students?

I was thinking along the lines of Abstract Algebra too, but I considered that it might just be too upper-division for the average high-school student.

But I do feel that any high school student motivated enough can at least tackle some of the basics. The right book is important too. The 900-page textbook I am using for my graduate level course is probably not the best idea.

A text book that isn't too dense should be fine. I think problems might arise with constructing new groups, though, like modding out by the kernel of some homomorphism, Field of Fractions, etc... Students will need a grasp on Set Theory for that.

Last March, I introduced Dihedral groups to my brother's 3 older kids, 11 to 13 at the time, and they were perfectly capable of filling out a Cayley table for the groups of symmetries of the equilateral triangle and square and had some fun with it. It wasn't difficult for them to notice that each element appeared in any given row or column exactly once, aside from the headings.

But perhaps the book I might recommend is my textbook for Sets and Logic:

Mathematical Reasoning: Writing and Proof by Ted Sundstrom
http://www.amazon.com/Mathematical-Reasoning-Writing-Proof-2nd/dp/0131877186/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1234136896&sr=8-1

It would be great for teaching students that writing and mathematics are not necessarily two different animals.

Software

+ - SpaceTime - new, 3D web browser->

Submitted by
secretsather
secretsather writes "SpaceTime 3D — It's not your daddy's web browser

  A New York based company, SpaceTime, has released an admittedly impressive beta version of its brand-new web browser. The SpaceTime browser puts the Internet in a completely three-dimensional environment while complementing the visually rich Web 2.0.

Until today, tabbed browsing was about the greatest thing you could find in a browser that one could say had a practical use. We're browsing on a web that is being visually enhanced at an exponential rate; yet, when it comes to the browser, people are simply satisfied with mediocrity. To them, I say, "no more."

"Since the inception of the Internet, the process of browsing has been limited and static. Now users can enjoy the richness of the Web with an application that is more interactive, intuitive and fun," said SpaceTime CEO, Eddie Bakhash.

The 7.8MB SpaceTime browser comes packed with plenty of visuals while not sacrificing any functionality. Perhaps the greatest aid in navigating the web comes in SpaceTime's layout of pages. Unlike Internet Explorer or Firefox, web pages are never really closed after they are open; they are simply added to a three-dimensional timeline in the browser. Previous pages can be viewed and recalled by navigating the 3D timeline.

SpaceTime's 3D search works in a similar manner. A Google search, for instance, will load the first 10 Google results in separate pages, thus eliminating the need to click each individual search result (usually followed by the 'back' button). Search results can be easily flipped through, re-arranged, or manipulated in the 3D environment.

The optimal system required to run SpaceTime is Windows 2000, XP, or Vista, with a minimum of 512 MB of RAM, 128 MB of video RAM, and a Pentium 4 2.4 GHz or AMD 2400xp+. Sure, it may be a bit much for a browser, but if you've never had a web browser that felt like a video game and computer can handle it, you may as well show it off.

As far as performance goes, it does consume more memory than Internet Explorer, but there is simply no comparison to Firefox, as Firefox seems to take memory and never give it back. Loading time took only a split-second slower than 'the norm,' but lost time is surely made up with SpaceTime's simultaneous search results.

This browser is definitely worth a look, and probably something that wouldn't hurt to install (for special occasions); however, there are a few minor features that have gone overlooked such as a feature to search text on a website, but hey, that's why they call it beta."

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