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Comment: Re:A little naive perhaps? (Score 1) 181

by Wesley Felter (#47708785) Attached to: Netflix CEO On Net Neutrality: Large ISPs Are the Problem

run a business without paying the traditional costs in the field and socialize your costs. in this case he wants every internet customer to pay for his bandwidth whether they use netflix or not.

ISPs chose their flat-rate business model; Netflix didn't force it on them. If that business model no longer works, ISPs should switch to a different one.

The Military

The High-Tech Warfare Behind the Israel - Hamas Conflict 402

Posted by samzenpus
from the who's-got-the-best-guns dept.
Taco Cowboy writes The Israel — Hamas conflict in Gaza is not only about bombs, missiles, bullets, but also about cyberwarfare, battles of the mind over social media, smart underground tunnels and cloud-based missile launching systems. The tunnels that Hamas has dug deep beneath Gaza are embedded with high tech gadgets, courtesy of Qatar, which has funded Hamas with billions to equipped their tunnels with intelligent sensors which are networked to control centers enabling the command and control staff to quickly notify operatives nearby that IDF units are advancing inside a certain tunnel, allowing for rapid deployment of attack units and the setting up of bobby traps inside the tunnel.

In addition, Hamas has automated its rocket firing system using networked, cloud-based launching software provided by Qatar which can set off a rocket from any distance, and set them to go off at a specific time, using timers. "Anyone who thinks they have dozens of people sitting next to launchers firing rockets each time there is a barrage is mistaken," said Aviad Dadon, a senior cyber-security adviser at several Israeli government ministries. While Doha is allowing Hamas to use its technology to fight Israel, it's their own cyber-security the leaders of Qatar are worried about. For the Qataris, the war between Israel and Hamas is a proving ground to see how their investments in cyber systems have paid of — Qatar is very worried that one of its Gulf rivals — specifically Saudi Arabia — will use technology to attack it, and Qatar spends a great deal of money each year on shoring up its cyber-technology.

Comment: Re:How has slashdot come to this? (Score 1) 150

Utter crap. Codenomicon are very friendly to FLOSS and FLOSS developers. They're also great guys. They have been providing free test services to the Samba project for many years now, and have helped us fix many many bugs.

In case you hadn't noticed, the code they're reporting on here is closed source proprietary code...

+ - UK to use Open Document Format for government documents->

Submitted by sfcrazy
sfcrazy (1542989) writes "UK has decided to use ‘open standards’ for sharing and viewing government documents. The announcement was made by the Minister for the Cabinet Office, Francis Maude. One of the primary objectives of this move is to create a level playing field for suppliers of all sizes. The move must put some pressure on Google to offer full support for ODF in Chrome, Android and Google Docs."
Link to Original Source

+ - U.K. Cabinet Office Adopts ODF as Exclusive Standard for Sharable Documents->

Submitted by Andy Updegrove
Andy Updegrove (956488) writes "The U.K. Cabinet Office accomplished today what the Commonwealth of Massachusetts set out (unsuccessfully) to achieve ten years ago: it formally required compliance with the Open Document Format (ODF) by software to be purchased in the future across all government bodies. Compliance with any of the existing versions of OOXML, the competing document format championed by Microsoft, is neither required nor relevant. The announcement was made today by The Minister for the Cabinet Office, Francis Maude. Henceforth, ODF compliance will be required for documents intended to be shared or subject to collaboration. PDF/A or HTML compliance will be required for viewable government documents. The decision follows a long process that invited, and received, very extensive public input – over 500 comments in all."
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Will it really go the pulseaudio way? (Score 0) 179

by Wesley Felter (#47057273) Attached to: Wayland 1.5 Released

There are two different ways to do network display: the RDP way and the right way. With RDP you're sending the entire "screen" over the network, so all the windows have to be composited first. Thus RDP requires a fully featured compositor like Weston on the remote end.

The right way is to send each window over the network, which should require a lightweight compression proxy. No one appears to be working on this.

Comment: Oh Microsoft, oh Microsoft.. (Score 1) 742

by Jeremy Allison - Sam (#46326529) Attached to: "Microsoft Killed My Pappy"

"Guys, I know we've been punching you in the face for 20+ years but we've *stopped* now !
Why don't you love us ?"

As someone who works very well with Microsoft these days and has many friends there, the lack of self-awareness in the posts on the article is staggering :-).

You have to do more than stopping being bad. Being *good* is required. :-).

I know you can do it ! Stop being a patent troll for starters.

+ - Hacker Public Radio audio interview with Jeremy Allison @ FOSDEM.->

Submitted by Jeremy Allison - Sam
Jeremy Allison - Sam (8157) writes "Here's a (long:-) interview that Ken Fallon of Hacker Public Radio did with me at FOSDEM. Covers a variety of subjects, from the Sinclair QL interview with Linus to how Samba got started (and how to steal programming time from your employer :-), to the Microsoft/EU lawsuit !"
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Heaven (Score 1) 420

by Jeremy Allison - Sam (#45980093) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Suggestions For a Simple Media Server?

The thing you have to understand is that this isn't a technical problem.

All of these things are well understood, and there are Free Software libraries that will do all of these things (indeed the proprietary commercial solutions are often built with these very self-same libraries).

No, this is a *legal* problem, with patents on software destroying the opportunity to create many wonderful things that consumers would love to buy, if the legal framework allowed it, which it doesn't.

It's almost unimaginable how much damage one simple thing (allowing patents on software) has done to the industry.

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