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Comment: Re:The solution is obvious (Score 1) 579

So here's what we're actually dealing with. Google maintains the Android Open Source Project, or AOSP. Every handset manufacturer uses this as a base for their own "distribution". The only distributions that Google actually builds are for their own branded handsets and tablets (the Nexus line). All of the other handset manufacturers build their own distribution(s) for their hardware, which effectively makes them the OS vendor for that hardware. It's analogous to other situations in open source software, where, for example, the kernel is developed and maintained by one group, but the individual distributions' maintainers (Debian, Ubuntu, etc) will package/build the kernel for their own distros and release it through their own repositories (ie when I run apt-get on an Ubuntu machine I'm pulling updates from Ubuntu and not, for example, from kernel.org).

This leads to situations like the current one, where the updates have been rolled into new versions (in this case you upgrade 4.3 to 4.4.x) but not every vendor has chosen to build and distribute these newer versions to their customers; Google is no more able to push these updates than the kernel.org maintainers are of pushing new kernels onto your Slackware machine.

Comment: Re:Oh Canada! (Score 1) 326

by liquidsin (#47941055) Attached to: New Study Projects World Population of 11B by 2100

Much of Canada is already quite easily habitable, it's just that there's nothing there to draw people to it. For a simple example take a look at Alberta. Looking at 2011 numbers the population of the province is 3.6 million, with about two-thirds of that living in Calgary and Edmonton. There's a LOT of wide open land that could easily be filled up with people and their stuff. If you had ten million people and some start-up capital you could build a metropolis somewhere between Calgary and the Montana border with easy access to roads, rails, farmland, water, etc. For reference, New York City has an area about 15 sq. mi. smaller than Calgary and roughly eight times the population.

Comment: Re:Nope they are clever (Score 2) 336

by liquidsin (#47935825) Attached to: Apple Locks iPhone 6/6+ NFC To Apple Pay Only

McDonald's has NFC enabled Interac handsets in their drive-thru. I wave my wallet at a machine for coffee a couple times a day. It's really more uncommon for me to find a vendor/retailer who *doesn't* have the NFC terminals these days. Back on topic, does this mean the new iPhones won't be able to use their NFC for anything besides payments? I quite like touching the backs of two NFC enabled android phones together to send links, contacts, photos, etc.

Comment: Re:No sovereign immunity (Score 1) 534

I've never been involved in a SWAT raid but my understanding from TV and movies is that they have to identify themselves when they enter. Are they identifying themselves as police or as private security? If it's the former, can they be charged with impersonating police officers? And if it's the latter can they be charged with break and enter? I feel like the castle doctrine/"stand your ground" law would absolve you of guilt if someone busted through your door yelling "PRIVATE SECURITY CORPORATION" and you shot them in the face...

Comment: Re:You know what they call alternative medicine... (Score 1) 517

The science is not, in fact, that easy, for a number of reasons. Off the top of my head:
  - "Energy Out" calculations can't be made in a vacuum; the amount of energy your body burns doing any exercise (even at rest) is largely determined by your current body composition, ie. more muscle mass takes more energy to maintain
  - All calories are not utilized the same; protein, for example, is used to build/repair structures and is not burned as "fuel". Counting protein calories is essentially useless, though tracking the amount consumed can be helpful (approximately one gram per pound of lean mass per day is considered a good baseline for an adult male of average activity level)
  - Certain foods trigger certain hormonal responses in the body that can effect metabolism. Insulin is a storage hormone. Anything that triggers a strong insulin response (sugars/grains) will predispose you to storing more of your "energy in". Likewise, staying too low on the "energy in" side of the equation will make your body think it's starving which will adversely effect metabolism. There are numerous studies showing that starvation diets don't work beyond short-term.

These are just the easy ones I can come up with without doing any real research. For a great example of how you can lose a lot of body fat (not just "weight") while not counting calories in/out, see "Four Hour Body" by Tim Ferriss.

Comment: Re:I went back to corporate America because Obamac (Score 1) 578

by liquidsin (#46476105) Attached to: White House: Get ACA Insurance Coverage, Launch Start-Ups

Fellow Canadian here. I'm fairly ignorant on all of the health care stuffs as I seem to have been blessed (so far) with decent health and no major accidents or injuries requiring expensive treatments. I'm a 35 y.o. male with no dependents or pre-existing conditions and a non-smoker. My health care costs show up as a $26 line item on my bi-weekly paychecks. What the fucking fuck America?

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