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Comment: A sneak peak at the results (Score 4, Funny) 50

by SuperKendall (#49626235) Attached to: SpaceX Testing Passenger Escape System Tomorrow

Don't tell anyone, but I'm from the future and wanted to give you a heads up how it goes:

Test 1: Make sure all thrusters installed pointing out.

Test 2: Humans can only withstand how much thrust?

Test 3: Make sure to thrust away from, not underneath, falling debris.

Test 4: Emergency homing signal for safe landing should be changed to not match Arbys drive through wireless mics. "Smoked with real smoke from real wood that's on real fire" ended up being a grimly accurate tagline.

Test 5: Turns out Ed was right and we really do need to add a laser canon for those damn pelicans.

Test 6: Success!

Comment: More than you know (Score 2) 115

wyoming has radiation?

Hell yes! Have you measured background radiation in the rockies?

communication delays?

Ever tried to maintain cell signal on the way to Yellowstone?

nothing to see, or to do?

Once you've seen Frontier Days once...

No medical equipment?

I go up there all the time with no medical equipment.

I don't know what that gravity would do to your digestive systems.

That's why every astronaut has died immediately after return from space with even less gravity...

I have to break character here and say - you are SUCH a retard. That's enough fun for me. You may carry on if you wish.

Comment: Why so difficult? (Score 2) 247

by Lumpy (#49622381) Attached to: USBKill Transforms a Thumb Drive Into an "Anti-Forensic" Device

Just set up a script on the machine looking for a specific USB device, start shutdown if the device is not present. This is pretty common stuff, hell my old Lenovo laptop has a smartcard slot in it that would do the same thing if the card was removed.

In fact if you look you can find the same thing all over the place for the last decade on many hacking sites, even back in the late 90's this kind of stuff was on the "scene" I had back to back modems in telcom rooms inside boxes that if the box was opened it dumped 110V into the modem logic boards so that when discovered they would self destruct.

Most "hackers" today probably dont even own a buttset.

Comment: Re:The review, it does something... as does sandbo (Score 2) 69

1) The app has to declare if it's going to be doing background processing, and you have to give a reason why they will accept. So not just any app can do that.

What we really need is the ability to turn on and off specific permissions by app. Perhaps with the ability to limit internet permission to certain IPs/URLs per app. That would solve most of the problem.

I thought Google added that ability in an early 4.0 or 5.0 version of Android, but then backed it out... Sadly I think because too many apps react badly when permissions are withdrawn it expects to run. The whole model creates a bad precedent I think where you assume you'll have all the app permissions you requested and so if any are withdrawn individually (which advanced users can do) the app is prone to break even though it could carry on just fine if it had been coded to detect that one permission was disabled. Google is going to have to bite that bullet at some point.

Comment: I think it may be for development (Score 2) 110

One of the things I was thinking the port was there for, was probably when developers could build native apps for the phone - since it would be a little pokey to ship debug builds and running debug info over wireless to the watch, a development cable would be a great idea.

It's probably also for Apple Store employees to run diagnostics (not sure if they have equipment for that yet).

Comment: Band would seem to cover port pretty well... (Score 1) 110

The diagnostic port is hidden by a cover. I'd be interested to see if removing the cover adversely affect's the watch's water resistance.

It may somewhat, but given that the port itself is located under the round part of the band that slides into the watch, it seems like it would be sealed away fairly well (especially if you designed the strap with that in mind).

It seems pretty sure sweat would not be able to get in there, really only submersion would have a chance.

Comment: The review, it does something... as does sandbox (Score 1) 69

I agree it would have been really illuminating to do the same test for a large range of free iOS apps.

However I think that you wouldn't see the most egregious of tracking stuff going on in iOS, for two reasons:

1) iOS reviews would I think alarm on something connecting to 810 different tracking sites. Definitely f you were trying to do anything like that in the background.

2) There's simply not as much data to gather. Most Android apps ask for all possible permissions, because why not? You're probably not going to read it anyway. With the iOS permissions as they are the user is going to think "why is this app which has nothing to do with contacts, asking for contacts" (or location, or photo library, or health data, etc).

That said I'm sure many free apps on iOS are doing everything they can possibly get away with, and I would love to see quantified just what that is.

This is now. Later is later.

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