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Comment: Of course (Score 1) 269

by linuxhansl (#46158987) Attached to: How Voter Shortsightedness Skews Elections
Plato said it 2500 years ago already, humans are not be trusted with voting because they are too stupid (paraphrasing here). This seems to be still true in the US (and much of the western world). Democracy is a great and so far the best system we found, but it only really works well with an informed and educated (and rational) populous.

Comment: Why does it matter... (Score 1) 298

by linuxhansl (#38311742) Attached to: Big Brother In the Home Office
how many units of time somebody works? When you hand out a contract you don't buy time, you buy a result.

Some people work fast and think about a problem even when "off work", and some people sit in front the computer all day long. This hole project is misguided and I would never give out a contract to somebody who measures his work this way.

Just my $0.02

Comment: Since when does an email replace a contract? (Score 1) 350

by linuxhansl (#35804046) Attached to: Ceglia Sues For 50% Facebook, Old Emails as Evidence
"Among the emails is one where Mark Zuckerberg agrees to split Facebook with Ceglia 50/50. If the emails are proven legitimate, Ceglia may own 50% of Facebook."

That might be so. Zuckerberg may also have written an email where he talk about eating babies alive. Unless Ceglia has a signed contract he is standing on thin ice.

Not that I am fan of FaceBook.

Comment: For somebody from Germany... (Score 1) 825

by linuxhansl (#33486084) Attached to: Gubernatorial Candidate Wants to Sell Speeding Passes for $25
90mph (=144kph) is not actually very fast.
On a semi-empty highway 160kph (=100mph) is a good cruising speed. And when in a hurry you'd go much faster... sometimes 220 kph or faster (~140 mph)

This reminds of car chasing scenes in American movies I watched as a kid, where folks would force their car to its limits... and a closeup of the speedometer would show the needle laboring somewhere between 90 and 100 mph. We always had a good laugh from that.

Comment: I don't like competition in a casual game (Score 1) 362

by linuxhansl (#33038566) Attached to: Too Much Multiplayer In Today's Games?
Personally I hate multiplayer online games. I have enough competition in my real world life and really do not need to add more of that during my spare time. I play very occasionally I do not want to invest time to acquire skill to be a worthy contender in whatever game I want to play.

If a game is multiplayer only, I usually avoid it.

Furthermore sometimes it seems companies just want to avoid the cost and effort to develop a good AI and then sell this as a feature.

Comment: Uninformed at best (Score 1, Insightful) 484

by linuxhansl (#31207662) Attached to: iPhone's Liquid Sensors Can Be Triggered By Wintertime Use
This is nonsense. Warm air carries more moisture than cold air. When taking a cold device into a warm room, the air will enter the device, cool down and water will start to condensate inside the device. Water from condensation is just as bad as water from a spill.

The liquid sensor is right to go off, as it should since many electronic gadgets/laptops were destroyed this way.

Comment: The easiest way to deal with such US demands... (Score 4, Insightful) 214

by linuxhansl (#31109490) Attached to: EU Overturns Agreement With US On Banking Data
is to require reciprocity. That goes for access to financial data as well as travelling/airline data.

It seems to me the US is quick to access other countries' data, but it far less willing to provide equal access to internal data as well.
Hence this would either level the playing ground or put a stop to US demands.

Comment: full byte comparisons (Score 1) 386

by linuxhansl (#29958946) Attached to: ZFS Gets Built-In Deduplication
I like this from the article:

> You can tell ZFS to do full byte comparisons rather than relying on the hash if you want full security against hash duplicates:

I once did similar a project with web content caching that replaced some data with a hash of said data with a way to get to the actual data. All sorts of people were worried about hash conflicts, etc. People are always worried about collisions.

It took a lot of convincing that that risk is lower than a nuclear strike on the data center(s).

What finally did convince my team mates was that 2^256 (~10^77) is by some estimates is close to the number of elementary particles in the visible universe (without a few orders of magnitudes at least).
So assuming the hash function is good (there's no evidence to prove otherwise), we'd have to try almost as many inputs as there are particles in the universe. The chances of hitting duplicates are so astronomically small that doing byte comparisons is most certainly useless, and just check mark feature for those types who worry about these things. AFAIK there are no known SHA256 duplicates.

Comment: Can we stop calling it "piracy" already? (Score 1, Flamebait) 366

by linuxhansl (#29708675) Attached to: Warez Moving From BitTorrent to Conventional Hosting Services
"Piracy" is a clever term coined by the music and file industry to associate file copying directly with stealing.

Existing information is replicated or copied nothing more and nothing less.
That may not be legal by current law, and there might be an "opportunity loss" for the content owner, but that is not "piracy" nor is it "stealing".

"Illegal content replication" just doesn't sound as snazzy and dirty as "piracy".

Comment: Will nobody think OF THE CHILDREN?! (Score 2, Interesting) 447

by linuxhansl (#29536599) Attached to: High-Tech Gadgets Can Pose Problems At Mexican Border
Of course the excuse mentioned in the article had to be the good and tried child porn excuse.
While I find sexual acts on children despicable and inexcusable, I am sick and tired of seeing my civil liberties eroded away by the same excuse over and over again.

It does not even help! One can put any questionable content on a memory stick and mail it across countries. If the content is encrypted one doesn't even have to worry about it being intercepted. If it is intercepted, just send another one.
In fact that is probably what I am going to do with private photographs/movies from now on (my parents and I live in different countries). The border agents then can nose around on my laptop all the want, without invading my private life. The point is that I should not have to do that.

Any terrorist actually caught during a border search is likely too stupid to carry out said terrorist act anyway.

"When it comes to humility, I'm the greatest." -- Bullwinkle Moose

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