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Submission + - San Diego Drops Red-Light Cameras (

gannebraemorr writes: "From "San Diego on Friday became the latest in a cadre of California cities turning their backs on red-light cameras — aloof intersection sentries that have prompted $490 tickets to be mailed to 20,000 motorists per year here. Mayor Bob Filner announced his decision to take down the city’s 21 cameras at a news conference set at the most prolific intersection for the tickets, North Harbor Drive and West Grape Street, near San Diego International Airport. A crew went to work immediately taking down 'photo enforced' signs throughout the city. 'Seems to me that such a program can only be justified if there are demonstrable facts that prove that they raise the safety awareness and decrease accidents in our city,' Filner said of the cameras. 'The data, in fact, does not really prove it.'"

I have to say I'm a bit surprised that my city is voluntarily shedding potentially $9.8M in revenue after objectively evaluating a program. I wonder how much a system would cost that could switch my light from green to red if it detected a vehicle approaching from a red-lit direction at dangerous speeds."


Submission + - Chips Capable of Mining Bitcoins 50 Times Faster Unveiled ( 2

hypnosec writes: A digital media student and head of BitSynCom LLC, Yifu Guo has invented a Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASIC) capable of mining Bitcoins 50 times faster than currently available computer systems and offers an impressive price-to-performance ratio and consumes a lot less power as compared to GPU-based system available today. According to tests carried out by the Bitcoin Foundation, the Avalon V1 churned out “89 gigahashes of raw crypto-juice every second" which is equivalent to that 250 Radion HD 5850 graphic cards each consuming 200 watts of power. The Avalon V1 managed to pull this off by consuming only 600 watts of power. Given the capability of the Avalon V1, it will provide its users anywhere between $200 to $300 worth of Bicoins every day.

Submission + - Geeknet considering selling Slashdot, Freecode, Sourceforge (

siliconbits writes: Pretty much summed up in the title. Also, Cmdrtaco has no comments on that.

"Geeknet, Inc. (Nasdaq:GKNT), the online network for the global geek community, today announced that its Board of Directors has authorized the Company and its advisors to explore strategic alternatives with respect to its online media business, including the SourceForge, Slashdot and Freecode websites. The Company and its advisors will evaluate a range of options to maximize shareholder value, including, but not limited to, a potential sale of the Company's online media business, investing additional capital to expand the online media business, or other possible transactions involving the online media business."

First Person Shooters (Games)

Combat Vets On CoD: Black Ops, Medal of Honor Taliban 93

An anonymous reader writes "Thom 'SSGTRAN' Tran, seen in the Call of Duty: Black Ops live action trailer and in the game as the NVA multiplayer character, gets interviewed and talks about Medal of Honor's Taliban drama. '... to me, it's a non-issue. This is Hollywood. This is entertainment. There has to be a bad guy if there's going to be a good guy. It's that simple. Regardless of whether you call them — "Taliban" or "Op For" — you're looking at the same thing. They're the bad guys.'" Gamasutra published a related story about military simulation games from the perspective of black ops veteran and awesome-name-contest winner Wolfgang Hammersmith. "In his view, all gunfights are a series of ordered and logical decisions; when he explains it to me, I can sense him performing mental math, brain exercise, the kind that appeals to gamers and game designers. Precise skill, calculated reaction. Combat operations and pistolcraft are the man's life's work."

Submission + - Too Young to Tweet? (

graychase writes: Parents now regularly set up infants and even fetuses with their own email accounts, reserve Facebook pages for them, set up blogs, and purchase vanity URLs for their names. One study says that a whopping 81 percent of kids have some kind of online presence before they turn two. Christopher Null talks to the parents of one such kid (@junipergrace) who's first tweet was "Born!" and examines the pros and cons of this behavior.

Submission + - Apple briefly becomes largest tech company (

An anonymous reader writes: Apple Inc briefly became the largest tech company in the world by market capitalization on Wednesday, after surpassing Microsoft Corp's market value, according to Reuters data.

Submission + - Ubuntu shows hole in iPhone data encryption (

An anonymous reader writes: A lost iPhone is a bigger problem than previously thought. Despite encryption the finder can gain easy access to data including photos and audio recordings, even if the owner has set up their iPhone to require a pass code. And, of all things, this is made possible with Linux — the very operating system which Apple regularly cold-shoulders. heise Security was able to reproduce this finding by Bernd Marienfeldt.

Submission + - Intel Abandons Discrete Graphics (

Stoobalou writes: Paul Otellini may think there's still life in Intel's Larrabee discrete graphics project, but the other guys at Intel don't appear to share his optimism.

Intel's director of product and technology media relations, Bill Kircos, has just written a blog about Intel's graphics strategy, revealing that any plans for a discrete graphics card have been shelved for at least the foreseeable future.

"We will not bring a discrete graphics product to market," stated Kircos, "at least in the short-term." He added that Intel had "missed some key product milestones" in the development of the discrete Larrabee product, and said that the company's graphics division is now "focused on processor graphics."


Submission + - The top 10 HTML5 sites dissected (

Barence writes: HTML5 might be a new and emerging technology, but there are plenty of websites out there that are already taking advantage of HTML5 features. PC Pro's Ian Devlin has picked 10 of his favourite HTML5 sites and explained the elements that make them work. He provides illustrated examples of how developers can use the canvas tag to embed moving animations into websites, the new embedded video tags and a terrific site that lets you drag and drop fonts onto a block of text to see what they look like.

Submission + - Google hijacks search results?

SomPost writes: I have just noticed that Google appears to hijack their own search result links. If you search for, say, "slashdot" and hover over the top result, the status bar will show "". But if you right-click on the link (e.g. to "Copy Link Location") the status bar link expands to "" which is a Google redirect. Unfortunately, clicking on the link will generate an extra history entry in IE8, effectively turning every target page into one of those obnoxious pages that you cannot back off from.


Submission + - Cutting Umbilical Cord Early Eliminates Stem Cells (

GeneralSoh writes: Delaying clamping the umbilical cord at birth may have far reaching benefits for your baby according to researchers at the University of South Florida’s Center of Excellence for Aging and Brain Repair — and should be delayed for at least a few minutes longer after birth. This new recommendation published in the most recent Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine (14:3) notes that delaying clamping the umbilical cord allows more umbilical cord blood and crucial stem cells to transfer from mama to baby.

Submission + - Virtualbox Minor Release (3.1.8)

aoshi73 writes: Not a major milestone, but now there is Ubuntu 10.04 LTS support. Can wait for the weekend so I can clean install my box. Thanks Canonical and Oracle
The Internet

Submission + - Adobe CEO Responds to Steve Jobs' Flash Rant (

An anonymous reader writes: The Wall Street Journal's Alan Murray talks with Adobe CEO Shantanu Narayen about Flash and Steve Jobs' recent open letter. According to Shantanu Narayen, Adobe believes in 'multi-platform, open systems' and Apple's 'recent behaviour show that they're concerned about Adobe being able to provide this value to customers and consumers alike.'

Numeric stability is probably not all that important when you're guessing.