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Earth

+ - Vacuum leaks lead to a NEW Hadron Collider delay-> 1

Submitted by suraj.sun
suraj.sun (1348507) writes "The restart of the Large Hadron Collider has been pushed back further, following the discovery of vacuum leaks in two sectors of the experiment.

The world's largest particle collider is now unlikely to restart before mid-November, according to a Cern press statement. The project had been expected to start again in October.

To repair the leaks, which are from the helium circuit into the insulating vacuum, sectors 8-1 and 2-3 will have to be warmed from 80K to room temperature. Adjacent sub-sectors will act as 'floats', while the remainder of the surrounding sectors will be kept at 80K, Cern said in the statement. The repair work will not have an impact on the vacuum in the beam pipe.

Cern has pushed back the restart a number of times, as repair work has continued. To begin with, scientists said the LHC experiment would restart in April 2009.

In May, Cern told ZDNet UK that the restarted experiment could run through the winter to make up some of the lost time. Normally, running the experiments through the alpine winter is prohibitively expensive, due to high electricity costs. However, as the experiment has not been running since last September, Cern would have the budget to cover energy costs over the winter.

ZDNet UK : http://news.zdnet.co.uk/emergingtech/0,1000000183,39689352,00.htm"

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Data Storage

+ - NoSQL - the new wave against RDBMS->

Submitted by
kevin glenny
kevin glenny writes "Over the past month, much press has appeared in the blogosphere dedicated to the NoSQL movement. I first came across their existence by reading this article on the Computerworld web portal and have been following the heavy traffic on the subject since. What follows is my take on how data stores fit into the RDBMS's ecosystem."
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Space

+ - Impact leaves Earth-sized scar on Jupiter->

Submitted by Anonymous Coward
An anonymous reader writes "An object has slammed into Jupiter leaving a "black scar" the size of Earth in the atmosphere of the giant gaseous planet. Experts believe the object is likely to have been a comet.

Images taken using an infrared telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, show a dark scar-like patch and a bright shower of debris particles in the planet's upper atmosphere. Scientists at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, ruled out a weather event as the cause of the mark."

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