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Comment: Re:Google admitting problem and trying to fix it (Score 1) 128

by lightversusdark (#38699146) Attached to: Google Launches Style Guide For Android Developers
What this means is that third-party apps can choose the native theme.
It does not necessarily mean that the user will be able to disable the "OEM experience".
You'll still be able switch out the launcher and use alternative apps for SMS, email etc. but you will probably not be able to uninstall Sense/TouchWiz/whatever and get the AOSP look and feel.

Comment: Re:Pros and Cons (Score 4, Informative) 123

by lightversusdark (#38378548) Attached to: Verizon's Galaxy Nexus To Launch Tomorrow
I've had one for a couple of weeks. UK GSM model (the "real" one : yakju/maguro).

Very happy. Replaced my N1 which finally gave up its power button after 18 months.

Pentaband radio works great on T-Mobile & AT&T.

Camera's better than the N1 - the speed it takes shots makes me happier than any extra MP, I think the pictures look great.

I'm not fussed about the expandability, although I only have 16GB (13.33GB formatted, it would appear). I've spent the last year and a half dealing with a 512MB application partition, so I don't really see the problem. USB mount handling is a bit surprising, especially as I'm on a Mac. I haven't bothered to install "Android Mount" or whatever Google are offering for download yet. Just using DropBox, and iPhoto picks up the device when in "Camera Mode".

It's real thin and it doesn't feel as good as the N1 or an iPhone, but this thing is going in a case. It fits in my pocket with my other phone, a Sony Ericsson Xperia Mini Pro.

I had the SE X10 Mini Pro and the N1 for the last year, and in the last month upgraded both of them. I still find myself using the Sony more because of the real keyboard.

The only complaints I have about the Galaxy Nexus so far is that the screen is so big, I don't find it comfortable to use the on-screen keyboard in landscape. I have to stretch to reach the middle if I am typing with two thumbs. Speakerphone's not the best. Headphone jack is on the bottom, which totally tripped me out when I got it out of the box, but actually turns out not to matter at all (and is kind of neater in a cheapo dashboard gripper). I am very impressed with the battery life so far, but nothing comes close to the Mini Pro (normally 3-4 days). I am a fairly heavy user of my devices.

The wierdest thing is that the lump on the bottom, it just feels like it should be at the top and I still take it out of my pocket upside down every time. I'll get over that.

Comment: Re:Any GSM Phone on Any GSM Network? (Score 1) 202

by lightversusdark (#34462744) Attached to: Google Launches Nexus S Phone In UK and US

No.

The two big GSM providers in the US use different 3G frequencies. (AT&T 850/1900, T-Mobile 1700/2100).

You can get voice and GPRS/EDGE, so long as your handset has been SIM unlocked (this is different to rooting or jailbreaking).

This is not an Android limitation, the same restrictions apply to iPhone/N900 etc.

I am not aware of any phone that has a flashable radio chipset allowing reconfiguration of the wireless bands, there may be a requirement for a physically different antenna.

The magic words used to be "quad-band", but nowadays you would want a radio that supported upwards of six bands for 3G capability across AT&T, T-Mobile, and rest of world.

Comment: Re:We dont need to know everything (Score 1) 1018

by lightversusdark (#34399602) Attached to: WikiLeaks Will Unveil Major Bank Scandal

I often discuss this with friends - what if Tony Blair had come to the British public and said:

"The US wants to go to war in Iraq.
"We don't really have any grounds to do so, and operations in Afghanistan have hardly begun, but it looks like they're committed to removing Saddam Hussein, and soon.
"It will take heavy public borrowing, soldiers' lives, and likely make us even more of a terrorist target, returning to conduct military operations in the ex-Empire.
"By our standards, we can't agree to it, but they will be "sexing-up" what little facts there are to get the support of the US media and public, and it seems they will be going ahead even if the whole world is opposed to it.
"It's not the right thing to do, but right now, I believe it's the right thing for the UK to back the US unconditionally in what they want to do."

It would never have happened, of course, much as I might wish for a world in which it did.
Not one politician has ever truly believed in "transparent governance", especially Tony Blair.
Also, it would not be the behaviour of an ally to publicly undermine the US gambit in this way.
So, I can see how the UK might have wanted to say one thing publicly, and another thing privately to the US.
The whole world knew exactly what was going on anyway.

The predominant reaction I am seeing to the WikiLeaks releases has simply been that people's suspicions are confirmed, albeit tinged with surprise that government actually seems to be such an amateurish business.

I wholly support WikiLeaks activities, but I understand the need for confidential communications.
The diplomatic system is better than nothing at all.
The whole affair is just fallout from a badly designed and implemented IT solution.

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