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Comment: Re:wouldn't matter if it weren't canned (Score 1) 337

Perhaps, but there is far more reason to think that Putin is lying, because he's been telling bald-faced lies to the entire world as recently as the past couple of weeks (concerning Ukraine). At least in the US, our politicians tell their lies in a gray area such that fact-checkers give numeric ratings to indicate just how untruthful a statement is. Putin just tells outright lies as if he believed them to be completely true and reasonable himself.

Or, phrased another way: In Soviet Russia, Putin fact-checks you!

Comment: Re:The President doesn't micro-manage this stuff (Score 1) 134

This is about technological implementation, and it's part of NSA's purview as a spy agency to explore technologies that further their ability to do their job. Part of that is discovering weaknesses in cryptographic systems which are trusted by the people you want to spy on.

The NSA also plays a counterintelligence role, and they're falling short of that if they don't take action to notify developers of a widely used Internet infrastructure utility that their software contains a critical exploit. If they can exploit it, so can the spy agencies of any other government with the skills to do so.

Comment: Re:Demand all you want (Score 5, Informative) 667

by Dachannien (#46551535) Attached to: Creationists Demand Equal Airtime With 'Cosmos'

(The Soviets saw Star Wars as a complete joke.)

Not true. Gorbachev was scared shitless over SDI, and it was really the only big sticking point in negotiations that could have reduced nuclear weapon stockpiles far more drastically in the 1980s than what actually happened. The Soviets responded to the threat of SDI by ramping up production of ICBMs and nuclear warheads, on the theory that it would be cheaper to overwhelm SDI with ridiculous numbers of targets than to try to devise a technological countermeasure or to produce an SDI of their own.

For reference, I highly recommend this book.

Comment: Re:Babylon 5 (Score 1) 276

by Dachannien (#46537053) Attached to: Interviews: Ask J. Michael Straczynski What You Will

Also, none of the movies were particularly good. The series is, full stop, better than star trek; But the movies were meh at best.

Are you kidding? B5: In the Beginning was amazing, to the point where I'm torn when introducing someone new to the series whether to show them ITB first or just start with the Season 1 pilot.

That said, Legend of the Rangers, with its Tae-Bo based human interface scheme, was horrible.

Comment: Re:Well ... what do you expect (Score 5, Interesting) 479

As I recall it, Saddam said the UN inspectors were welcome, as long as there were no American inspectors there, because he was convinced they were CIA spies.

No, Saddam didn't want the inspectors there because he didn't want actual evidence to get out that he didn't have WMDs. He was more afraid of Iran than he was the US, and he said as much after he was captured and before he was executed.

Comment: Cognitive dissonance (Score 4, Informative) 120

by Dachannien (#46299877) Attached to: Drive-by Android Malware Exploits Unpatchable Vulnerability

Vulnerable devices are any device that is running a version earlier than 4.2 (in which the vulnerability was patched) which is a staggeringly large amount of the market.

The vulnerability is in Android itself rather than the proprietary GMS application platform that sits atop the base operating system so it is not easily patched by Google.

But apparently not so difficult as to make it impossible? Is there something I don't understand here, or was this summary just horribly written?

A LISP programmer knows the value of everything, but the cost of nothing. -- Alan Perlis

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