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Comment: Re:wouldn't even be reported (Score 1) 211

by lgw (#48467047) Attached to: Top Counter-Strike Players Embroiled In Hacking Scandal

As you say there is a toxic culture in some places and if you stand up and fight besides these people you have lost, or if they fight for you cause. It's a common problem.

Nope, it doesn't work that way. You're just wrong, sorry, you lose.

See what happened there? You used a tactic that works mostly against people who avoid confrontation. Why is gamergate still a thing after all these weeks? Because SJW tactics don't work against people who seek confrontation online, and are used to achieving their goals by endlessly grinding, week after week, until they win.

You will not succeed in convincing all "gamers" that an ugly stereotype applies to them. Best give up now.

Comment: Re:Well of course (Score 1) 318

by lgw (#48467019) Attached to: LinkedIn Study: US Attracting Fewer Educated, Highly Skilled Migrants

People in "dirt poor nations" are just as much "people" as here, and just as deserving of jobs. No moral wrong happens when a job moves from here to there - arguably the reverse given the safety net in each nation. But anyway, the point is that it's only short-term turbulence: China and India will eventually buy a lot more stuff than the US and EU, and will drive vastly more modern jobs worldwide as a result.

Comment: Re:wouldn't even be reported (Score 2) 211

by lgw (#48461895) Attached to: Top Counter-Strike Players Embroiled In Hacking Scandal

There is, in fact, a well-documented "conspiracy", though not a very secret one. There was also a well-coordinated effort in social media sites that gamers frequented to suppress all mention of gamergate (Reddit shadowbanned everyone talking about it, 4chan (of all places) banned everyone talking about it).

No, there's a difference between investigation and the concerted harassment by gamergate idiots.

Sure, but both "misogyny" and "journalistic ethics" are dodges here. Neither is really what gamergate is about: it's about a full-on culture war between the majority of the gaming press, and the actual gamers. The call for more gender sensitivity in game design, for example, seems harmless enough, what provokes people is simply outsiders to their culture demonizing that culture and insisting that it has to change - culture war.

Mostly, I think the real issue is just semantics - the culture of, say, CoD players (and other FPS games that attract mostly teen boys) can be toxic at times, but to criticize "gamers" as if they were all in that group really pisses off all of us addictively playing every other kind of games - from Candy Crush to Civ5.

Comment: Re:school curriculums? (Score 1) 474

by lgw (#48460441) Attached to: Cops 101: NYC High School Teaches How To Behave During Stop-and-Frisk

Of course, but in all those cases, the singular is uncommon- the plural was really the borrowed word. Most people would say "one piece of data", "one agenda item", "one bacteria", or "one criteria" (only the last one bothers me, as "criteria" seems plural instead of uncountable to me).

Comment: Re:Well of course (Score 1) 318

by lgw (#48455569) Attached to: LinkedIn Study: US Attracting Fewer Educated, Highly Skilled Migrants

Have you noticed the thing about technology? It improves your standard of living. And no, "technology" doesn't mean iPhones, it means more efficient ways to produce everyday goods, cheaper in terms of labor, energy, and raw materials.

For 150 years now people have been complaining about how technology will make all the jobs go away and everyone will starve. Not so much, as it turns out. Making stuff cheaper always creates new job making more stuff, so the first world benefits, and the economies of India, China, and Brazil keeps growing (although China has it's own bubble to work through these days), and the middle class in each nation keeps expanding.

Again, it's not a zero-sum game. You want the course that makes the pie grow the fastest over time, rather than squabbling over who gets what slice. Exponential gains always trump linear gains over time.

Comment: Re:Relativistic Species (Score 1) 291

by lgw (#48455531) Attached to: Complex Life May Be Possible In Only 10% of All Galaxies

You probably just take a several-billion-year nap.

While napping may indeed be popular in the retired community, travel is as well. And it seems likely the two passtimes could be combined, after all.

The energy will have to come from elsewhere, then.

This is even less practical than a stellar engine - you can hop between galaxies in only a few subjective centuries at 1g acceleration. Even with antimatter fuel the rocket equation becomes problematic after a while, but at least the physics makes sense. Try to send power to something moving past you near c, however, and you're sure to hear "I canna change the laws of physics, Captain!"

Comment: Re:Relativistic Species (Score 2) 291

by lgw (#48453651) Attached to: Complex Life May Be Possible In Only 10% of All Galaxies

That's why it isn't useful. You can't use it for anything interesting to anyone but you

And if the only problem remaining to you in life is boredom?

So, what would a star moving at near-C look like to the rest of us?

Get it going fast enough and it would look somewhat like a gamma ray burst, to those directly ahead of it, and be invisible from most directions. But there's probably not enough energy in a star to get it up to that sort of speed, at least with any sort of "stellar engine" anyone has yet imagined.

Comment: Re:Well of course (Score 1) 318

by lgw (#48453399) Attached to: LinkedIn Study: US Attracting Fewer Educated, Highly Skilled Migrants

Every job I've had for at least 10 years is in competition with people in low cost of living areas. Even so, I remain employed, and well paid. There's value in working local, and there's value in being good at what you do, so there's some premium to be had vs the cheapest place available.

Meanwhile, home prices in Bangalore are higher than rural America now - I would expect other factors of cost of living to follow.

You can certainly compete in a global market, if you're talented. If, however, you're doing some mindless job that anyone who can fog a mirror can do equally well, from any place in the world, then there's just no valid moral reason for the job to stay here. Further, it's only a matter of time before no one, will have that job. Technology means automation, and automation is why technology improves everyone's standard of living. The future is bleak for unskilled labor, worldwide, but that's not an outsourcing issue.

Comment: Re:Well of course (Score 1) 318

by lgw (#48452935) Attached to: LinkedIn Study: US Attracting Fewer Educated, Highly Skilled Migrants

It is possible to 'grow the pie', but not by eliminating customers

That's exactly it. You grow the pie enormously, as China, India, and Brazil rise to "developed economy" standards of living (this has arguably already happened for S Korea). More than doubling the number of consumers is a massive gain for all of us, but most of all for all the people joining us at our standard of living!
 

Comment: Re:Well of course (Score 1) 318

by lgw (#48452117) Attached to: LinkedIn Study: US Attracting Fewer Educated, Highly Skilled Migrants

The economy is not a zero-sum game. This is not a race to the bottom. As low cost-of-living places get more and more jobs, their standard of living rises and costs go up accordingly.

If your job doesn't require an in-person presence, then you're competing on a global market. Best get used to that fact - it's not going away, and isolationism spells certain death for modern economies.

And don't overlook the key fact that more people buy a given product than work to make it. If lower pay means lower costs, net advantage is had to the economy: that's been studied for e.g. Walmart selling lots of stuff made in China. The total amount saved by all Americans in buying these products is several times larger than the total lost wages. For business-to-business products, maybe it doesn't work that way, I don't know, but I wouldn't just assume it's bad for the economy.

Comment: Re:Tamper Evident (Score 1) 103

by lgw (#48451167) Attached to: Nuclear Weapons Create Their Own Security Codes With Radiation

It might not be much of a win for occupational safety and health; but a nuclear warhead does have a substantial chunk of conventional explosives built into it, which could be used to express displeasure at attempted tampering a bit more vehemently than bombs do today. Still not 100% foolproof; but raises the odds a bit.

Rest assured, this is an idea that has occurred to silo/missile designers. I used to work with a guy who was an officer for a nuke base in his prior career. He didn't go into detail, of course, but he mentioned a couple of times that silo nukes were a step beyond merely "tamper resistant", and that messing with one would not be a good life strategy - even normal maintenance made him nervous.

Comment: Re:school curriculums? (Score 1) 474

by lgw (#48449473) Attached to: Cops 101: NYC High School Teaches How To Behave During Stop-and-Frisk

This language right here that you're reading? Not Latin. It's perfectly fine to use the English plural of English words, whatever language they're borrowed from (it's not like English has many words that weren't taken from another language). To do otherwise come across as pretentious pseudo-intellectualism, except perhaps in a formal context. Plus, most people end up embarrassing themselves with something like "octopi" when they try.

Unix is the worst operating system; except for all others. -- Berry Kercheval

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