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Submission + - Linux Foundation: Security Threatens 'Golden Age' Of Open Source

Mickeycaskill writes: The executive director Linux Foundation has outlined its plans to improve open source security, which could otherwise threaten a 'golden age' which has created billion dollar companiesand seen Microsoft and Apple among others embrace open technologies.

The organisation launched the Core infrastructure Initiative (CII), a body backed by 20 major IT firms, last year and is investing millions of dollars in grants, tools and other support for open source projects that have until now been underfunded.

This was never move obvious than following the discovery of the Heartbleed Open SSL bug last year.

“Almost the entirety of the internet is entirely reliant on open source software,” he said. “We’ve reached a golden age of open source. Virtually every technology and product and service is created using open source.

“Heartbleed literally broke the security of the Internet. Over a long period of time, whether we knew it or not, became dependent on open source for the security and Integrity of the internet.”

“We want to find the projects on the Internet that are broken and fix them. We have raised a multi-million fund to provide grants to projects to help them out."

“We’re not talking about some new technology product or service, we’re talking about your privacy, your security. We believe creating a more secure, more robust Internet is good for all of us.”

Submission + - Microsoft keeps sneaking in update

lesincompetent writes: How many of you noticed the infamous KB3035583 coming back over and over again even after being manually hidden?
Yes, that's the one that brought us both the free windows 10 upgrade notice and the unwarranted download of up to 6GB of installation files.
For us with no intention of "upgrading" to windows 10, how can we end this frustration once and for all?

Submission + - New attacks on Firefox (and Internet Explorer, Edge) privacy

An anonymous reader writes: Researchers unveiled two attacks against privacy in Firefox. Both attacks exploit HTML5's performance object. The first attack probes the computer's cache for data from other users/processes. The second attack (demo here) finds the computer's clock speed and whether it's virtualized. This one also applies to Internet Explorer and Edge browsers.

Submission + - The first successful collision attack on the SHA-1 hashing algorithm

Artem Tashkinov writes: Researchers from Dutch and Singapore universities have successfully carried out an initial attack on the SHA-1 hashing algorithm by finding a collision at the SHA1 compression function.They describe their work in the paper "Freestart collision for full SHA-1". The work paves the way for full SHA-1 collision attacks, and the researchers estimate that such attacks will become reality at the end of 2015. They also created a dedicated web site called ironically The SHAppening.

Perhaps the call to deprecate the SHA-1 standard in 2017 in major web browsers seems belated and this event has to be accelerated.

Submission + - The TPP Agreement Is Not A Free Trade Agreement (

An anonymous reader writes: We've pointed out a few times in the past that while everyone refers to the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) agreement as a "free trade" agreement, the reality is that there's very little in there that's actually about free trade.

Comment Re:SubjectsInCommentsAreStupid (Score 1) 205

Trying to clean up the cruft (so tedious) and solving any potential problem(s) or combination thereof by hand is more time consuming than starting from a clean slate.
If you already have a decently upkept system (like i had) i could agree with you but it is a rare case.
In fact i almost kept my in place upgrade but then my clean system obsession kicked in.

Submission + - Chrome For Android's Incognito Mode Saves Some Of The Sites You Visit

An anonymous reader writes: A newly found bug in Google Chrome for Android means incognito mode really isn’t as locked-down as it’s designed to be. Some sites you visit while using the privacy feature are still saved, and can be retrieved simply by opening the browser’s settings. Google Chrome for Android has had incognito mode since February 2012. Here is Google’s official description of the feature: “If you don’t want Google Chrome to save a record of what you visit and download, you can browse the web in incognito mode.”

Submission + - Car industry 'buried report showing US car safety flaws over fears for TTIP deal (

schwit1 writes: The motor industry has been accused of withholding a report that reveals US cars are substantially less safe than European vehicles — for fear that the findings would hamper the drive to harmonize safety standards as part of the controversial Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) deal.

The major study was commissioned by the car industry to show that existing EU and US safety standards were broadly similar.

But the research actually established that American models are much less safe when it comes to front-side collisions, a common cause of accidents that often result in serious injuries.

Submission + - Facebook unfriending constitutes 'bullying', says Australian workplace tribunal

An anonymous reader writes: Unfriending employees on Facebook and not saying good morning could constitute workplace bullying, an Australian workplace tribunal has ruled. Australia's Fair Work Commission decided that administrator Lisa Bird had bullied real estate agent Rachael Roberts after unfriending her from Facebook. The commission's deputy president Nicole Wells said the act showed a "lack of emotional maturity" and was "indicative of unreasonable behavior."

Submission + - From Radio to Porn, British Spies Track Web Users' Online Identities (

Advocatus Diaboli writes: "There was a simple aim at the heart of the top-secret program: Record the website browsing habits of “every visible user on the Internet.” Before long, billions of digital records about ordinary people’s online activities were being stored every day. Among them were details cataloging visits to porn, social media and news websites, search engines, chat forums, and blogs. The mass surveillance operation — code-named KARMA POLICE — was launched by British spies about seven years ago without any public debate or scrutiny. It was just one part of a giant global Internet spying apparatus built by the United Kingdom’s electronic eavesdropping agency, Government Communications Headquarters, or GCHQ."

"One system builds profiles showing people’s web browsing histories. Another analyzes instant messenger communications, emails, Skype calls, text messages, cell phone locations, and social media interactions. Separate programs were built to keep tabs on “suspicious” Google searches and usage of Google Maps. The surveillance is underpinned by an opaque legal regime that has authorized GCHQ to sift through huge archives of metadata about the private phone calls, emails and Internet browsing logs of Brits, Americans, and any other citizens — all without a court order or judicial warrant. Metadata reveals information about a communication — such as the sender and recipient of an email, or the phone numbers someone called and at what time — but not the written content of the message or the audio of the call."

The two most common things in the Universe are hydrogen and stupidity. -- Harlan Ellison