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Submission + - "Happy Birthday" Public Domain after all?->

jazzdude00021 writes: No song has had as contentious of copyright history as "Happy Birthday." The song is nearly ubiquitous at birthday parties in the USA, and even has several translations with the same tune. Due to copyrights held by Warner Music, public performances have historically commanded royalty fees. However, a new lawsuit has been brought to prove that "Happy Birthday" is, and always has been in the public domain.The discovery phase for this lawsuit ended on July, 11 2014, yet this past week new evidence surfaced from Warner Music that may substantiate the claim that the lyrics were in the public domain long before the copyright laws changed in 1927. From the source:

And, here's the real kicker: they discovered this bit of evidence after two questionable things happened. (1) Warner/Chappell Music (who claims to hold the copyright for the publishing, if it exists) suddenly "found" a bunch of relevant documents that it was supposed to hand over in discovery last year, but didn't until just a few weeks ago, and (2) a rather important bit of information in one of those new documents was somewhat bizarrely "blurred out." This led the plaintiffs go searching for the original, and discover that it undermines Warner Music's arguments, to the point of showing that the company was almost certainly misleading the court. Furthermore, it definitively shows that the work was and is in the public domain.


Link to Original Source

Comment Re:Obscure dates/times, too (Score 2) 48

Retrospectively,
Aug. 1 is the birthday of Otto Toeplitz, German mathematician, author of The enjoyment of mathematics. Selections from mathematics for the amateur (with Hans Rademacher).
Oct. 3 is the day Edouard Lucas, French mathematician, known for his study of the Fibonacci sequence, died.

Programming

Submission + - The 21st IOCCC has been announced->

leob writes: As promised at the end of the 20th IOCCC earlier this year, the 21st International Obfuscated C Code Contest will accept entries from 2012-Aug-15 03:14:15 UTC to 2012-Sep-14 09:26:53 UTC. The earliest announcement about the next contest was on Twitter on July 13, giving the interested parties more than 2 months to polish their entries.
Link to Original Source
Hardware Hacking

Submission + - Researchers create 'rubbery metal'

Space_donkey writes: Researchers at Virginia Tech have developed a new type of metal that also has the vibration-dampening properties of rubber. That's according to a patent filing discovered by New Scientist. Ultimately, it might be used in aircraft engines and other systems that experience a lot of vibration. In the shorter-term it could also be seen in sports equipment such as tennis rackets and baseball bats.
The Almighty Buck

Submission + - Advertising on WIkipedia?

An anonymous reader writes: Some Wikipedians have objected to Virgin Unite's participation in the Wikimedia Foundation's fund drive, calling it adverising. But there's a strong case that Wikipedia should run advertising. The funds raised could support dozens of Firefox-scale free knowledge and free software projects, outspending all but the wealthiest foundations.
Books

Submission + - Classical Chinese Combinatorics

h9xh9xh9x writes: A computational linguist in a federally-funded research project at UC Berkeley has solved a 3,000 year-old mystery, in a new book entitled Classical Chinese Combinatorics. A mathematical proof found hidden in an ancient Chinese text shows how the Chinese invented binary mathematics 600 years before the time of Euclid.

"Who cares if it doesn't do anything? It was made with our new Triple-Iso-Bifurcated-Krypton-Gate-MOS process ..."

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