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Comment: Wow, that gamasutra article!! (Score 1) 724

by Brian_Ellenberger (#48052369) Attached to: Intel Drops Gamasutra Sponsorship Over Controversial Editorials

"ÃGame cultureÃ(TM) as we know it is kind of embarrassing -"
"ItÃ(TM)s young men queuing with plush mushroom hats and backpacks and jutting promo poster rolls. "
"petri dish of people who know so little about how human social interaction"
"infantilized cultural desert of shitty behavior"
"You know, young white dudes with disposable income"
"atrocities committed by young white teen boys in hypercapitalist America"
"ItÃ(TM)s probably intense, painful stuff for some young kids, some older men."
"Gamers are over. ThatÃ(TM)s why theyÃ(TM)re so mad. "
"These obtuse shitslingers, these wailing hyper-consumers, these childish internet-arguers"

This sounds like the mad rantings of a Freshman Gender Studies student who have never touched a video game, not the news director of a gaming website! It is nothing more than sexist, ageist, name-calling. It sounds like she not only hates her job but also hates the industry she is covering. No wonder Intel pulled their support, I can't imagine any corporation would want to be associated with this.

Comment: Re:So-to-speak legal (Score 1) 418

by Brian_Ellenberger (#47908625) Attached to: Comcast Allegedly Asking Customers to Stop Using Tor

The problem is that government is being used to choke out the competition, especially at a local level: http://www.wired.com/2013/07/w...

Comcast uses government regulation as a shield to block competition. So yes, the libertarian solution would be to remove these blocks and open up the options.

And you are naive to think that anyone in government, especially Democrats, will regulate Comcast. Obama has been in bed with Comcast for a while http://thehill.com/policy/tech.... And Comcast owns NBC, which owns MSNBC--the Fox News of the Democrat party.

Sorry to bust your Government/Democrats good Republicans/libertarians bad bubble.

Comment: Re:"Undead" doesn't mean vibrant, though. (Score 1) 283

by ZigMonty (#47311617) Attached to: Perl Is Undead
Sure... the only use for pass is to allow an empty block. But outside of canned examples and temporary debug hacking, empty blocks are not exactly used very often. Hence in the vast majority of cases, python has no "end-brace". Claiming that the pass keyword is a closing brace is disingenuous as it implies that it is always required. It *is* a no-op. You can use the pass keyword absolutely anywhere you want, and it will do nothing. It's only "useful" however in the largely useless case of empty blocks.

Comment: Re:No winners economically (Score 1) 268

by Rayonic (#47288455) Attached to: The EPA Carbon Plan: Coal Loses, But Who Wins?

I have little sympathy for an industry that could have spent the last 40 years reducing their emissions.

Paying for extra emission reduction would put you at a competitive disadvantage against power plants who just did the bare minimum. Or, in a highly regulated environment, it might run you afoul of price controls.

Comment: Re:The Religious Right will have your head on a pl (Score 3, Insightful) 470

by Brian_Ellenberger (#46669065) Attached to: It's Time To Bring Pseudoscience Into the Science Classroom

You can't teach critical thinking in schools. The Texas state Republican party platform is explicitly opposed to it.

--
I piss off bigots

Your sig is ironic since your opinion is quite bigoted. There is a great deal of pseudoscience belief on both sides of the isle. The left has irrational beliefs on nuclear power, GMO foods, etc. There was an article in the Washington Post about Democrats believing in horoscope and astrology more than Republicans/Independents: http://www.washingtonpost.com/...

Comment: Re: Solution - Face-saving way out (Score 1, Insightful) 482

The entire pro-choice movement is based on the concept of "My Body My Choice". You start forcing people to accept injections of anything into their bodies and you lose the moral basis for that argument. How do you "force" people to accept vaccines? Strap them down and inject them? Could anything be more frightening than the government forcing chemicals into someone's veins? That will make people even more anti-vaccine than ever.

I'm am very pro-vaccine. From childhood illnesses to flu to hpv, I want them all for myself and kids. And I have gotten into arguments with ignorant anti-vaccine people. What I have found is that they simply have lost all faith in "authority" because they have been lied to time and time again. WMD in Iraq! You can keep your insurance! Eat the food pyramid because you need to eat twice as much bread as you do veggies (not kidding, look it up). Leaders lie and lie and lie again to get what they want. Is it any wonder why people don't believe anything. In fact, it seems like the more forceful the denial the more likely the lie. You try and make vaccines mandatory you WILL make a bigger anti-vaccine movement.

Comment: Re: First blacks, (Score 1) 917

by Brian_Ellenberger (#46341367) Attached to: Apple Urges Arizona Governor To Veto Anti-Gay Legislation

Congratulations, your hateful vitriol against people who believe differently than you does more to justify the need for this legislation than any argument supporters could make....

Tolerance comes in both directions. If you can't see the difference between refusing to serve someone based on skin color and refusing to go to and participate in a ceremony that your religion disagrees with, I genuinely feel sorry for your blind hatred.

Comment: IDE for search, refactoring, etc (Score 2) 627

by Brian_Ellenberger (#46328245) Attached to: Does Relying On an IDE Make You a Bad Programmer?

I'm surprised that so many of the comments for IDEs are restricted to things like autocomplete. IDEs do far more than that. Things like smart refactoring (beyond GREP/Replace), code searches and navigation (find references, go up and down the object hierarchy, find impls), and debugging (attach to remote process, breakpoints, etc).

Comment: Re:End of November (Score 1) 250

by Brian_Ellenberger (#45241889) Attached to: Jeffrey Zients Appointed To Fix Healthcare.gov

Not really. It sounds like a position that should have been filled from the beginning is just now getting filled.

The mythical man month does not directly cover the case of being under-manned until a month after release, then bringing staffing up to where it should be. And certainly if that is the entirety of your contribution, I have to assume you mean the most recognized portions of the concept.

Under-manned because they hired one more person? I haven't seen any evidence they were understaffed or under-manned. And someone I'm skeptical that a CEO guy with a BS in Political Science and no Software Engineering background is the key to turning this around.

Comment: Re:It may all be for naught (Score 2) 250

by Brian_Ellenberger (#45241795) Attached to: Jeffrey Zients Appointed To Fix Healthcare.gov

And since they are treated differently than people in the other 14 states that do have exchanges, you can bet an Equal Protection lawsuit will be quick in coming.

Here is the Equal Protection Clause:

All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside. No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.

Note that the boundary of the clause is the State. Different states have different laws all the time. Massachusetts has had statewide healthcare for a long time, and Vermont passed a single-payer healthcare. Oregon has vote-by-mail. Minnesota abolished the death penalty while it remains in the majority of states. Some states have legalized marijuana, while in Pennsylvania you can only buy wine and spirits from state owned shops. Taxes are different, environmental laws are different, etc.

Statehood wouldn't mean much if states weren't allowed to have different laws.

Comment: Missing human "imagination" (Score 4, Insightful) 277

by Brian_Ellenberger (#44597419) Attached to: Why Computers Still Don't Understand People

The thing missing with many of the current AI techniques is they lack human "imagination" or the ability to simulate complex situations in your mind. Understanding goes beyond mere language. Statistical models and second-order logic just can't match a quick simulation. When a person thinks about "Could a crocodile run a steeplechase?" they don't put a bunch of logical statements together. They very quickly picture a crocodile and a steeplechase in a mental simulation based on prior experience. From this picture, a person can quickly visualize what that would look like (very silly). Same with "Should baseball players be allowed to glue small wings onto their caps?". You visualize this, realize how silly it sounds, and dismiss it. People can even run the simulation in their heads as to what would happen (people would laugh, they would be fragile and fall off, etc).

Comment: Re:He's right - Android is eating iOS's lunch (Score 0) 692

by mblase (#44555951) Attached to: Larry Ellison Believes Apple Is Doomed

OK, I'll bite. Without using brand names, please tell me what you can do (e.g., use cases) with an iOS device that you can't do with an Android device of equal or lessor price?

I can give an iPod or iPhone to my kids and trust that they're not going to download any malware or spyware or SMS-overcharging trojans onto it.

All other things being equal, the inherent security of the iOS ecosystem is leaps and bounds better than anything Android is even capable of coming up with.

Comment: Re:Cool but probably not feasible... (Score 5, Insightful) 533

by ZigMonty (#44547127) Attached to: Elon Musk's 'Hyperloop': More Details Revealed

The problem I see with this is while it's nice to dream about 800 mph travel, I can't imagine that it would be feasible to construct a track or tube that could follow the terrain at that speed and still maintain passenger comfort. If you are building above-ground supports, you don't want them to be 500 ft tall as would probably be required in order to keep the tube straight enough for passenger comfort and safety.

Luckily, advancement doesn't have to wait for the average guy's imagination to catch up. Have you actually read the proposal or are you just doing the usual slashdot thing?

The guy runs two companies, one in the space business and one that makes electric cars. I'm sure he'll need to ask a construction company for advice about the pillars, etc, but is there any reason to suppose he hasn't run this past the best engineers in those two companies? I'm sure his cost estimates are off, they can only be estimates this early in a design study, but it's not like he doesn't have engineers that know aerodynamics and vehicle design.

I'm willing to give him the benefit of the doubt until real rebuttal arrives, say from someone who can point out actual errors in the proposal.

Comment: Re:sick of windows at work (Score 2) 251

by mblase (#44437281) Attached to: Early Surface Sales Pitiful

OSX isn't competing with Surface, per se, and OSX may be a POSIX compliant system, but why does Apple do things like make Safari non-compliant with regard to standards like the W3? One web site I worked on had the worst rendering with Safari. I mean, almost useless W3 non-comliance. We had to develop a plug-in to deal with some of our stuff. Firefox, IE? No issues. We could use the stock browser components.

What website would that be? I prefer to do my testing in WebKit browsers, personally.

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