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Submission Summary: 0 pending, 5 declined, 2 accepted (7 total, 28.57% accepted)

+ - Will that crowdfunded game ever actually ship? (The "2 out of 3" test)->

Submitted by lars_doucet
lars_doucet (2853771) writes "The failure of the Yogscast game is just the latest in a long string of high-profile kickstarter busts. Backers should do their due dilligence, but if we're honest, most of us don't have time to run the numbers and dig really deep. So here's a simple "rule of thumb" test for quickly assessing crowdfunding risk:

1. Is it a NEW TEAM?
2. Is it a NEW DESIGN?
3. Is it using NEW TECH?

Scoring:

0-1: Safe (but not guaranteed)
2: Risky
3: Expect Failure

Image: http://www.files.fortressofdoo..."

Link to Original Source

+ - Dear Adobe: Support open source, save your tools->

Submitted by lars_doucet
lars_doucet (2853771) writes "I'm a game developer that has been using Adobe tools (Flash in particular) for over 15 years. Though the Flash plugin definitely deserves it's reputation for slow performance, crashes, and security holes, there was something special about the Flash workflow and ecosystem: the plugin was installed everywhere, it gave you massive distribution, great animation tools, and it was easy to use.

Thanks chiefly to Adobe's neglect, clients and developers are losing confidence in the Flash platform.
However, Adobe can restore confidence if they:

  — Abandon empire-building
  — Embrace open-source standards like Haxe
  — Focus on their core competence: selling development tools"

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+ - Latest Humble Bundle Supports Open Source GameDev Tools->

Submitted by lars_doucet
lars_doucet (2853771) writes "The latest Humble Weekly Bundle is titled "Celebrating Open Source" features eight indie games, with charity going to the open source tools used to develop them.

The open-source programming language Haxe is strongly represented: three of the charities include the Haxe Foundation itself, OpenFL (recently featured on Slashdot), and FlashDevelop, the most popular open-source Haxe/ActionScript IDE. The fourth is Ren'Py, the Python-based visual novel engine used in award-winning games like Long Live the Queen and Analogue: A Hate Story.

The games themselves are Magical Diary, NEO Scavenger, Offspring Fling!, Planet Stronghold, and for those who pay $6 or more, Anodyne, Defender's Quest, Evoland, and Incredipede, as well as 6 soundtracks.

7 of the 8 games are cross-platform across Mac/Win/Linux, and all are DRM-Free."

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+ - Flash is Dead, Long Live OpenFL!->

Submitted by lars_doucet
lars_doucet (2853771) writes "I am a 15-year Flash veteran and nobody hates to say this more than me: Flash is dying, and the killer is Adobe. Where to now? HTML5 doesn't help me with native targets, and Unity is proprietary just like Flash was — "don't worry, we'll be around forever! And so sorry about that neglected bug report — we're busy."

I'm putting my bets on OpenFL, a Haxe-based, fully open-source implementation of the Flash API that might just please both Flash refugees and longtime Flash haters alike.

My article discusses my experiences with it and gives a brief overview for newcomers. In short — I can keep making flash games if I want, but with the same codebase I can also *natively* target Win/Mac/Linux desktops, mobile, and more, without having to mess with Adobe AIR or other virtual machines."

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+ - Procedural Death Jam to benefit OpenGameArt.org->

Submitted by lars_doucet
lars_doucet (2853771) writes "There's a new name for "games with RogueLike Elements": Procedural Death Labyrinth. The new genre term encompasses everything from FTL to Spelunky, and is the center-piece of a new game jam that is benefiting OpenGameArt.org, a site for freely licensed art assets for use indie games.

Procedural Death Jam will run for 7 days starting March 8th, and will be a "sister jam" to the popular 7-day roguelike challenge. The events aren’t competing with one another, but cross-promoting instead."

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DRM

+ - SimCity vs. Piracy & The Four Currencies (Video)->

Submitted by
lars_doucet
lars_doucet writes "The SimCity debacle is another example of AAA publishers resorting to DRM because "game developers can't compete with free."

But piracy is only "free" in terms of Money-dollars ($M). There's also Time-dollars ($T), Pain-in-the-butt-dollars ($P), and Integrity-dollars ($I). If we look at the total "4-currency" cost, we can see that piracy is not only not "free," but that there's plenty of opportunities for legitimate services to compete through convenience ($T), service ($P), and appealing to higher principles ($I).

This short video explains the whole theory, showing how SimCity's always-online DRM not only misses a golden opportunity, but shoots itself in the foot and actually *raises* its four-currency cost well above that of piracy:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tP7KUVfx9ec"

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Games

+ - Steam Linux Sale - 3x as many Linux sales as Mac!->

Submitted by
lars_doucet
lars_doucet writes "I'm an independent game developer lucky enough to be on Steam. Recently, the Steam Linux client officially went public and was accompanied by a site-wide sale.

The Linux sale featured every single Linux-compatible game on the service, including our cross-platform game Defender's Quest. In preparation for this article, I asked the good people of Reddit's /r/linux_gaming subreddit what sort of data they'd like to see, and today I'd like to answer both their questions and yours.

Bottom line: during the sale we saw nearly 3 times as many Linux sales of the game as Mac (Windows still dominated overall)."

Link to Original Source

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