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Comment: Re:Not a contract (Score 1) 226

by larien (#47683511) Attached to: Posting Soccer Goals On Vine Is Illegal, Say England's Premier League
The negotiation point is moot. There is the option for you to negotiate the terms with the ticket seller, but there is no onus on the seller to alter the terms if they don't want to.

In specifics - the advertisement to sell the ticket is an "invitation to treat". Proferring money to the seller is the "offer" and it's implicit that the offer is on the terms of sale advertised in the invitation to treat (including terms regarding prohibition of cameras/filming) and the seller accepts the offer. The buyer could place an offer whereby they offer to buy the ticket buy allowing filming. The seller can then reject the offer and/or present a counter-offer (e.g. you can film if you pay some fee to allow filming).

Comment: Re:Ticket ToS (Score 1) 226

by larien (#47680869) Attached to: Posting Soccer Goals On Vine Is Illegal, Say England's Premier League
You're right, it has nothing to do with copyright, it's contract law (essentially) and laws covering permission to take pictures on private land (the football stadium).

The argument from the premier league is around videoing clips off the TV and posting online which is pretty clear copyright infringement.

Comment: Re:I don't understand how this is a "record" (Score 1) 84

Submarine crews generally experience surface pressures, ~1 bar. 18 metres down will be ~2.8 bar with attendant risks of decompression sickness (aka the bends) on the way up unless he comes up very slowly. This kind of thing is known as "Saturation diving and is done all the time e.g. in the North Sea for oil, often for weeks and at greater depths than Fabien is planning.

The 30 days "record" does seem to imply he's doing more than others have done which is rather misleading; it's certainly different from submarines, though.

The Almighty Buck

Seattle Approves $15 Per Hour Minimum Wage 1040

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the only-sort-of-starving-now dept.
An anonymous reader writes "The Seattle City Council announced on Monday that it has unanimously approved a $15 per hour minimum wage mandate. The new rate will go into effect starting April 1, 2015 in a tiered, gradual manner that depends on employer size. In the first year of implementation, hourly minimum wage will be raised to either $10 or $11 according to the employer size category. By 2021, hourly minimum wage across the board should be at or above $15. Seattle is the first city to implement a living wage for its lowest earners."

Comment: Re:32TB of RAM = Everest-sized UPS (Score 2) 174

by larien (#44927707) Attached to: Oracle Promises 100x Faster DB Queries With New In-Memory Option
*facepalm*

No, you don't use main memory as a write cache, that would be idiotic. You use it for read cache. Any updates will be written to disk (and memory) before acknowledging to the client.

In any case, it doesn't matter how good your batteries/UPS are if your server or DB software crashes for any reason and you have uncommitted writes in memory, hence why caching writes on a database is a Bad Idea (TM).

Comment: Calling foul on #2 (Score 1) 142

by larien (#44320669) Attached to: Nine Traits of the Veteran Network Admin
"Veteran network admin trait No. 2: If we don't know it's down, it's probably not down"

Bullshit. Well, either that or our network admins are numpties. We had a switch go down in a data hall. We knew the switch was fubar as we'd lost connectivity to a number of devices at the same time. Networks wouldn't admit a fault. We eventually got moved to new switch ports and lo, everything started working.

The usual approach to any network fault in our place is "replace your NIC". That has, in my memory, fixed maybe two faults.

Comment: Re:Here's how my team handles it... (Score 1) 110

by larien (#43565285) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: How Do You Assess the Status of an Open Source Project?
The issue about ignoring future proofing is that you can invest a lot of time & effort integrating the tool into your environment, writing scripts etc. If that tool gets obsoleted for any reason, it can be a lot of work to switch to an alternative (this goes for FOSS & commercial software equally). You can get locked in to FOSS just as easily as with commercial, you just have a few more options available with FOSS. Some tools can be swapped in & out at a moment's notice, but if you integrate something into your way of working very closely, it can be a nightmare to unpick later.

As for modifying code yourself, that requires a whole set of skills & disciplines many admin teams don't have - I know our team/organisation would struggle with that. There are, of course, 100s of companies who are quite happy downloading source & patching/maintaining it themselves.

Other than that, there's some good advice in there. Version control & release/test cycles are key for any software product.

Comment: Re:Apt-get install clue (Score 1) 303

by larien (#42246319) Attached to: How To Use a Linux Virtual Private Server
I've done Unix admin for years. I still find it quicker and easier to manage clusters with a GUI because frankly, they're too bloody complicated to manage effectively without one. Yes, you can automate with the CLI (I've written scripts to automate service group creation in VCS), but for a quick dive in to check the cluster status & configuration, it's usually quicker with a GUI to drill down to the setting you need.

Comment: Re:Cisco what? (Score 1) 220

by larien (#41791909) Attached to: Cisco Pricing Undercut By $100M In Big Cal State University Network Project
Facebook & Google have networks/systems designed to work around failure and data loss is a minor inconvenience. They expect to lose a data centre at various times and continue to Just Work. In those environments, cheap grey boxes are fine provided you design appropriately. If you are designing a critical 24x7 system which cannot spread around in the same way (e.g. financial institutions) may have different requirements.

Now, while I'm not saying that Alcatel is less reliable than Cisco, Cisco generally has the reputation of reliability (warranted or otherwise) and so commands the premium.

1 + 1 = 3, for large values of 1.

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