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Comment: Re:how many of these people don't want to retire? (Score 1) 267

by laie_techie (#46787911) Attached to: I expect to retire ...

ah, yes, those russian brides can be expensive...

I'll have you know I didn't purchase my bride. We were introduced online through a mutual friend. The expenses I mentioned were the K-1 visa and associated fees the US government charges (almost a thousand bucks just for the interview!!!). Hiring a coyote would have been cheaper than jumping through all the legal hoops.

Comment: Re:how many of these people don't want to retire? (Score 1) 267

by laie_techie (#46787819) Attached to: I expect to retire ...

The last statement I got from the Social Security Administration says I have to be 68 before I can start claiming. That's higher than 65, so I chose 75 or before. I want to retire at 60, but that's not going to happen. Married life is expensive, plus all the legal fees for my wife to legally enter and remain in the US.

Two thoughts on the expenses for your wife; 1) negotiate the purchase price to include delivery. many mail order businesses will cut a deal. 2) have her buff up, travel to Mexico, then run for the border.

I'll have you know I didn't purchase my bride. We were introduced online through a mutual friend. The expenses I mentioned were the K-1 visa and associated fees the US government charges (almost a thousand bucks just for the interview!!!). Hiring a coyote would have been cheaper than jumping through all the legal hoops.

Comment: Re:how many of these people don't want to retire? (Score 1) 267

by laie_techie (#46782111) Attached to: I expect to retire ...

When I see ages like 75 and never, I wonder if these are people who don't want to stop working, or people who financially can't stop working. My grandfather is 92 and still working...by choice.

The last statement I got from the Social Security Administration says I have to be 68 before I can start claiming. That's higher than 65, so I chose 75 or before. I want to retire at 60, but that's not going to happen. Married life is expensive, plus all the legal fees for my wife to legally enter and remain in the US.

Comment: Re:Polution tax (Score 1) 157

by laie_techie (#46768177) Attached to: Pollution In China Could Be Driving Freak Weather In US

But the tea party assures me that once we rid the world of gays and abortion, the deficits will right themselves!!1!

Another case of spreading lies about your adversaries. Many (not all) within the Tea Party are against homosexuality and elective abortions, but these perceived evils will not / do not have an economic impact. The Tea Party is about local governments having more control than the federal government (all powers not given explicitly to the federal government in the Constitution is reserved for the States or the Individuals). Being Pro-life and Pro-Traditional Marriage is not core to the Tea Party.

The deficits will right themselves when the government learns to live within its means. No more multibillion dollar programs without some way of funding them. Our loans incur millions of dollars of interest every day. Consolidate government entities when it makes sense. Off-load social programs to the state and local levels when it makes sense. Have the President pay a larger portion of his vacations (how many times has Obama flown to Hawaii to play golf?). Fix Senate and Congress pay to a multiple of minimum wage or the cost of living.

Comment: Re:Op Out Knowledge? (Score 1) 157

by laie_techie (#46641763) Attached to: Should Patients Have the Option To Not Know Their DNA?

Knowledge is choice, without knowledge there is no choice. You can not choose to ignore knowledge, you are only in ignorance embracing ignorance. However DNA knowledge should be very tightly restricted with severe penalties including imprisonment, otherwise you will be 'opening up' people to organ donor bounties.

My biggest worry would be the insurance companies. Has everyone already forgotten Gataka? If I have a genetic predisposition to alcoholism, should I pay higher rates (even though I've never had a glass in my life)? If I have a genetic predisposition to certain types of cancer (but no symptoms) do my rates go up because of what may be?

Comment: Re:Who says computers will take over.... (Score 1) 275

My first name has at least 3 spellings, and mine is the least common of them. My last name has 3 or 4 that I can think of. That's a lot of variations on my name. Surely, one of those is a terrorist!

There are 86 common variations of my surname. I know that there individuals with my same first name with 5 of those variations, plus an additional three who use my exact surname. Mistaken identity is fun!

Comment: Re:Could it be (Score 1) 255

I have never seen a Blu-Ray disk, and I am not too sure anyone I know has. You must live in the USA (not a device for connecting hardware).

The correct capitalization is Blu-ray. Also, are we going to argue the difference between disk and disc? Most (US) dictionaries list them as being the same. A disk can be defined as any thin, flat, circular plate or object or (when talking computers) any of several types of media consisting of thin, round plates of plastic or metal, used for external storage (magnetic disk, floppy disk, optical disk) (taken from dictionary.com). Admittedly, the BDA does use disc to refer to the media.

Comment: Re:Wouldn't work (Score 1) 313

by laie_techie (#46399977) Attached to: Should programming be a required curriculum in public schools?

I hated homework. I would glance over the assigned reading, do a couple of the assigned problems, but only complete the entire homework if it was something I didn't immediately grasp. School was about education, not some dumb grade, but my test scores ensured me an A- or B+ in most classes. My parents called me Encyclopedia Brown because of the ease I could learn and recall things. One regret is that my schools didn't teach proper English, but rather the local Pidgin. To this day I have to stop and think when communicating in American English. I picked up tons of vocabulary from the books I devoured, but often mess up pronunciation.

Comment: Official Languages (Score 1) 506

by laie_techie (#46359203) Attached to: Quebec Language Police Target Store Owner's Facebook Page

Hawaii has two official languages (English and Hawaiian), but 80% of the population speaks "Pidgin" (Hawaiian Creole English) and fewer than 4% are fluent in Hawaiian. In Hawaii's case, "official language" means that all official publications are available in these two languages (people specify which one they want, so as to not make the manual twice as thick, for example). Nothing prevents people from speaking Tongan, Samoan, Japanese, or Pidgin in everyday life. Nothing says that only Hawaiian and English are acceptable for store signage. Nothing says that private entities (including stores) have to make everything available in these languages. Indeed, only limited Hawaiian is taught in our regular schools (by the fourth grade I could count to ten and say the primary and secondary colors). What Hawaiian I know is purely by luck that it was preserved in Pidgin.

Comment: Re:my daughter (Score 1) 280

by laie_techie (#46324519) Attached to: Who's On WhatsApp, and Why?

In the UK almost every plan seems to come with an unusuablly high or unlimited amount of SMS anyway which is still cheaper than the $1 a year Whatsapp costs.

I use it because I have that one friend who also insists on using it and nothing else. Maybe I should just stop speaking to him and save myself $1 a year.

The only actual benefit I can see to it is for images which are cheaper and seem to work more reliably than MMS.

I'm in the US, but I need to message people in Brazil, England, and China. International SMS is ridiculously expensive. Not everyone has Facebook or Skype, so WhatAapp makes sense if I want to chat and not pay outrageous per-minute voice calls.

It is contrary to reasoning to say that there is a vacuum or space in which there is absolutely nothing. -- Descartes

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