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+ - Dutch forensic scientists discover how to date fingerprints->

Submitted by kyriacos
kyriacos (1374383) writes "Dutch forensic experts discovered how to accurately date fingerprints, a breakthrough that could one day let police date crime scene prints from years ago. Fingerprints leave nearly-unique marks on a surface that can be copied and compared to a database to identify a suspect, a police technique that rose to prominence in the early 1900s. The prints themselves are made up of sweat and grease, including a complex mix of cholesterol, amino acids and proteins. 'The chemicals in these fingerprints can be analysed,' said Marcel de Puit, fingerprint researcher at the Dutch Forensic Institute (NFI). 'Some disappear over time and it's the relative proportions of these chemicals that allow us to date a fingerprint.' As the database expands, so should the technique's reliability, allowing police to date fingerprints from several years before."
Link to Original Source

+ - Samsung Smart TV Bug Allows Remote Access, Root Privileges->

Submitted by kyriacos
kyriacos (1374383) writes "Threatpost reports: "It turns out that some smart TVs are a little too smart for their own good--and the good of users. Some specific models of Samsung TVs that have Wi-Fi and other advanced capabilities have a flaw that enables an attacker to take a variety of actions on the TV, including accessing potentially sensitive data, remote files and information, the drive image and eventually gain root access to the device.""
Link to Original Source
Security

+ - Anonymous Attacks Greek Finance Ministry, Classified Documents Leaked->

Submitted by kyriacos
kyriacos (1374383) writes "The leaked documents include various classified data: from e-mails that were exchanged between the Greek Ministry and envoys from international lenders negotiating more austerity measures and bailouts, to thousands of passwords of Greek individuals and evaluations of banks."
Link to Original Source
Privacy

+ - Journalist arrested in Greece for publishing list of possible tax-evaders

Submitted by kyriacos
kyriacos (1374383) writes "The Greek government is charging journalist Kostas Vaxevanis with violation of the data privacy law. While more and more austerity measures are being taken against the people of Greece, there is still no investigation of tax evasion for the people on this list by the government. The list has been in the possession of the Greek government since 2010. More information here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-20116548"

Comment: Re:Good boyyy!!!! You're going to get a treat, UK! (Score 1) 212

by kyriacos (#41003021) Attached to: 'Pirate' Website Owner Sentenced To 4 Years In Prison
We are the god damned lapdogs, the idiots who download all kinds of movies, sitcoms and what not, because we need to occupy our minds with crap. God forbid we read an extra book or get some exercise instead. I'm under the impression that this war broke out simply because it makes the products seem more valuable than they actually are.

Comment: Re:Legalise drug trade (Score 1) 627

by kyriacos (#37427698) Attached to: Anonymous Kills Websites, Cartels Kill Bloggers
I agree that legalizing drugs will bring down the associated crime rate and will probably also result in less substance abuse, but I think what most people fail to realize is that the main opponent of legalization is the drug cartels. They are the ones who are not letting this happen, and they will either bribe or wipe out any government that attempts to move towards that direction.

+ - NoW whistle-blower Sean Hoare found dead->

Submitted by kyriacos
kyriacos (1374383) writes "BBC News writes:

"A former News of the World journalist who made phone-hacking allegations against the paper has been found dead at his home in Watford.

"Mr Hoare had told the New York Times hacking was far more extensive than the paper acknowledged when police first investigated hacking claims.

"A police spokesman said the death was currently being treated as unexplained, but was not thought to be suspicious."

Link to Original Source

+ - How to build a VM honeypot?

Submitted by jongleur_kit
jongleur_kit (836236) writes "Today I received the latest in a series of scam phone calls. This time it was the "ammyy scam," in which the scammer tries to get you to install a remote access program. After playing dumb for a while to see how they operate I had to stop there and confront them on their nefarious methods (they get you to open your Windows event log and tell you that the errors and warnings are undelete-able "viruses" and hence you need their services). At that point they immediately hung up.

I was frustrated that I couldn't go further with this and collect more information on the scammers. I have an MSc in Computer Science, and I think it would be a fun project to create a honeypot for just such instances.

I assume a good honeypot would involve a VM and some active (nmap) scanning and also some passive (p0f) scanning, ideally with the ability to record sequences of actions on my box if I let them in.

Can anyone point me to a good forum or how-to guide on this, or give some advice in this thread? What would a good setup include?

Finally, I am a US citizen now living in the UK, and I have no idea what the legal context is here. What are the rules in the UK regarding entrapment, etc.? What if I were to run a few of these and post information (like IP addresses, phone numbers, etc.) in a blog post? Is that legal here?

Thanks

PS: I'm cross-posting this over at Reddit under user name abplayer."
Science

+ - New Report: Fat America Keeps Getting Fatter->

Submitted by
kkleiner
kkleiner writes "A report just out, from non-profits Robert Wood Foundation and Trust for America’s Heath (TFAH), has the feel of an environmental armageddon. And the title says it all: “F as in Fat: How Obesity Threatens America’s Future.” Chew on this: going back 20 years there wasn’t a single state with an obesity rate above 15 percent. Today, there isn’t a single state that’s below 15 percent!"
Link to Original Source

Comment: Re:Really? (Score 1) 205

by kyriacos (#29184203) Attached to: Facebook App Exposes Abject Insecurity

But, every time you install an FB app, it DOES ask you if you wish to allow the app to have full access to your information. So, if you don't feel comfortable, don't click that button!

That's true, but when I add a friend, I get no warning that this person has so many apps installed, and that these apps can have access to my information through this person.

Idle

+ - iPhone App Tracks Sex Offenders

Submitted by
The Narrative Fallacy
The Narrative Fallacy writes "All 50 states in the US require the 50,000 people convicted of sexual offenses to sign a register so that their whereabouts can be tracked and monitored. The Telegraph reports that now users of the iPhone Offender Locator application can search for sex offenders living nearby a friend or colleague whose address is stored in their Apple iPhone address book, or they can type in a street address to generate a list of convicted sex offenders in the local area. "Offender Locator gives everyone the ability to find out if registered sex offenders live in their area," says the application developer, ThinAir Wireless, on its iTunes page. "Knowledge equals safety. They know where you and your family are...now it's time to turn the tables so that you know where they live and can make better decisions about where to allow your kids to play." Offender Locator uses the iPhone's built-in GPS to pinpoint the user's location, and then provide a map listing sex offenders in the local area. Tapping on one of the 'pins' dropped on to the map brings up a photograph of the offender, as well as their address, date of birth and list of convictions."
Security

+ - McAfee emails 1400 customer details on bulk list-> 1

Submitted by
Robbie Burbanks
Robbie Burbanks writes "Security vendor McAfee has mistakenly sent out a bulk email blast attached with a document that lists the contact details and company demographics of some 1400 security experts that attended its recent Strategic Security Summit in Sydney. McAfee claims that because it discovered its mistake halfway through the send, it cannot know how many people the bulk email was sent to. Check out the Flickr screen-grabs of the offending bulk email send and an interview with McAfee's Asia Pacific vice president for more."
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