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Submission Summary: 0 pending, 15 declined, 1 accepted (16 total, 6.25% accepted)

Electronic Frontier Foundation

Submission + - What do you think of open wifi vs. network neutrality? 11

kwerle writes: "There was a recent story on slashdot about the EFF suggesting that folks leave their hotspots open to the public. One of the major concerns discussed was the issue of bandwidth hogs — and the frequently suggested solution was traffic shaping/limiting.

Network neutrality has often been covered on slashdot, and is also supported by the EFF. It seems like most slashdotters also support it.

My question for the slashdot audience is how you resolve the issue of bandwidth shaping your neighbors with the notion of network neutrality. After all, if your neighbor supplies a service through your network, and you limit traffic speed/volume to their system, you are violating network neutrality. Right?"

Submission + - Minneapolis bridge failure blamed on design (

kwerle writes: "Initial findings [into the bridge that collapsed August 2nd, 2007] by the National Transportation Safety Board said metal plates used in construction were not thick enough to bear eventual loads.

It blamed the original 1964 design and not sloppy workmanship.

The bridge failure was mentioned previously on slashdot. There is a lot of information also available at wikinews."


Submission + - Solar plane stays aloft 54 hours (

kwerle writes: "From the BBC News

A solar powered plane built by a UK defense company successfully stayed aloft through 2 nights (54 hours total). An unspecified fault cut it's flight short. A second flight of 33 hours was cut short by threatening thunderstorms.

The Zephyr is not the first solar-powered plane to fly through the night (SoLong: htm), but it claims to be the first that remained powered the whole time — as opposed to gliding occasionally.

The Zephyr has a 59' wingspan, and reached an altitude above 58,000'."

It's not hard to admit errors that are [only] cosmetically wrong. -- J.K. Galbraith