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Comment: Re:It's about time (Score 1) 355

by kriston (#48965537) Attached to: New Multi-Core Raspberry Pi 2 Launches

That's right. They state that everything else is the same as the original Pi B+ which means it runs everything off the USB bus.

Having a better CPU is vitally important when you run nearly everything off USB. The USB bus is CPU-dependent, unfortunately, but with this new processor/memory package, we've got a big improvement, here.

Comment: It's about time (Score 5, Insightful) 355

by kriston (#48956207) Attached to: New Multi-Core Raspberry Pi 2 Launches

The Raspberry Pi series is an awesome hobbyist device at an impossibly low price point.

I'm glad they are finally offering more memory and multi-core processors. That way I don't need to get a BananaPi or other copycat. This way, I can continue to support the vitally important Raspberry Pi foundation and their goals.

Thanks for finally offering more memory and multi-core. Next time let's also choose a truly open framebuffer, or let's pressure Broadcom to open their VideoCore architecture once and for all.

Comment: Kensington Expert Mouse (Score 1) 431

by kriston (#48896895) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Where Can You Get a Good 3-Button Mouse Today?

I switched to the Kensington Expert Mouse trackball when it first came out many years ago. All versions have four buttons. The newer versions have added a scroll ring around the trackball. As a result, I have been able to avoid RSIs. The added benefit is that users of these trackballs have enhanced functionality in day-to-day operations, from programming, to browsing, to graphics work, and gaming.

Since you mentioned physical discomfort with a dangling ring finger I must stress that you try out the Kensington Expert Mouse (can be bought new as cheap as $60). The ring finger rests on the right button or the upper-right button depending on your preference.

Transportation

Tesla To Produce 'a Few Million' Electric Cars a Year By 2025 181

Posted by Soulskill
from the go-big-or-go-home dept.
HughPickens.com writes: Reuters reports that Elon Musk, speaking at an industry conference in Detroit, said Tesla may not be profitable until 2020 but that Tesla plans to boost production of electric cars to "at least a few million a year" by 2025. Musk told attendees at the Automotive News World Congress that "we could make money now if we weren't investing" in new technology and vehicles such as the Model 3 and expanded retail networks.

Musk does not see the Chevrolet Bolt as a potential competitor to the Model 3. "It's not going to affect us if someone builds a few hundred thousand vehicles," said Musk. "I'd be pleased to see other manufacturers make electric cars." On another topic, Musk said he was open to partnerships with retailers to sell Tesla vehicles, but not until after the company no longer has production bottlenecks. "Before considering taking on franchised dealers, we also have to establish (more of) our own stores," said Musk adding that "we will consider" franchising "if we find the right partner." Musk did not elaborate, but said Tesla "is not actively seeking any partnerships" with other manufacturers "because our focus is so heavily on improving our production" in Fremont. Last year, Tesla delivered about 33,000 Model S sedans and said the current wait for delivery is one to four months. Tesla has already presold every Model S that it plans to build in 2015. "If you ordered a car today, you wouldn't get it until 2016."

+ - Static analysis of the Linux kernel->

Submitted by kriston
kriston (7886) writes "From the web site: "This problem is interesting by its difficulty. Linux kernel source code was checked and is checked by everything and anything. That is why it is difficult task — finding something new. However, that would be an excellent advertising note about PVS-Studio analyzer possibilities."

Sections have interesting titles like "Dangerous memcmp() usage," "Eternal wait," "Copy-Paste error," and "Rip out eyes.""

Link to Original Source

Comment: The old "Are you my grandson?" Twitter gag (Score 1) 128

This reminds me of the "Are you my grandson?" Twitter gag. Someone sent messages to hundreds of celebrities and media personalities stating things like, "Are you my grandson?" and "Where am I?" The account got tens of thousands of followers and mentions on the radio and in the media.

Then, suddenly, one morning the user changed the name and picture and started tweeting jihadist propaganda.

Comment: Re:Workstation Laptops (Score 1) 325

by kriston (#48767903) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: High-Performance Laptop That Doesn't Overheat?

The HP EliteBook "workstation" is very, very fast and has a robust cooling system. It's far better than a Mac. I also use a Dell XPS Ultrabook which is just as fast but is also extremely quiet and stays cool mostly due to the aggressive Turbo Core feature. I run a VirtualBox system with full Linux desktop running both PostgreSQL and MySQL servers on this little Ultrabook, too.

Comment: Re:So how are these spread? (Score 1) 181

by kriston (#48756161) Attached to: Inside Cryptowall 2.0 Ransomware

In a case I was recently troubleshooting, the vector was an advertisement popup that asked the user to click to download and install an Adobe Flash Player update.

The user downloads it and runs it. Then it runs quietly in the background with the same privileges as the current user.

I feel the need to reiterate here that Cryptowall does NOT require privilege escalation. If you happen to be a local administrator it will ask for it so it is able to delete shadow copies and Restore Points, but it does not need any extra privileges to encrypt your data and thus accomplish most of its aims.

Comment: Re:RC4, how weak is it? (Score 1) 148

by kriston (#48756025) Attached to: Tips For Securing Your Secure Shell

RC4 isn't "broken." It is only bad when used incorrectly to store static data, like some older electronic wallet software had done. When used as a stream cipher it's very efficient and very, very secure.

Even the default re-keying interval is sufficient but if you are really skeptical you can shorten it and have it re-key based on time, quantity of data transmitted, or both.

There's no sense in being precise when you don't even know what you're talking about. -- John von Neumann

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