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Submission Summary: 0 pending, 11 declined, 1 accepted (12 total, 8.33% accepted)

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Submission + - Microsoft to test ad-supported version of Works (

krelian writes: Works is the Microsoft's basic spreadsheet and word processing software. Microsoft now plans to offer a free but ad supported version of the software through OEM's.
"Unlike Google Docs and Spreadsheets, which are delivered through an Internet browser, Microsoft plans to pre-install Works on computers and display advertisements stored in cache. The software normally retails for $39.99. When a user connects to the Internet while using Works, that cache of ads will refresh, said Melissa Stern, a Microsoft senior product manager in the Office group."


Submission + - Microsoft Is Still Growing

krelian writes: Microsoft rarely breaks out its specific product revenue, but that's what the chief financial officer did yesterday. In a rare moment of nuts-and-bolts disclosure, Chris Liddell laid out fiscal year-end revenue for seven products during Microsoft's annual Financial Analysts Meeting.

Microsoft-Watch complains that Windows and Office are not on the list but I guess it is pretty difficult to show a 20% growth rate on a product that already has 90% market share.
Sun Microsystems

Submission + - Sun Says OSS Developers Need To Be Compensated

krelian writes: "Talking at Netbeans Day, Rich Green, Sun executive vice president for software, expressed doubts about the current model in which open-source developers create free intellectual property and have others scoop it up to generate huge amounts of revenue. "It really is a worrisome social artifact," Green said. "I think in the long term that this is a worrisome scenario [and] not sustainable. We are looking very closely at compensating people for the work that they do.""

Submission + - The Problem with Programming

krelian writes: "MIT's Technology Review has an interview with Bjarne Stroustrup, inventor of the C++ programming language about C++ and software programming in general."...looking at "average" pieces of code can make me cry. The structure is appalling, and the programmers clearly didn't think deeply about correctness, algorithms, data structures, or maintainability.""

"People should have access to the data which you have about them. There should be a process for them to challenge any inaccuracies." -- Arthur Miller