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Comment: Re:I actually read the article... (Score 1) 272

by kittylu (#47238835) Attached to: EU May Allow Members Home Rule On GMO Foods
There is an inherit difference between mere "splicing" and the ultra complex "modification" often overlooked and erroneously conflated here. Traditional splicing is likely benign, while the latter is socially and environmentally reprehensible. Reading, and maintaining proper perspective.

Comment: Re: Beta sucks! Off Topic (Score 1) 164

by kittylu (#46170053) Attached to: Designer Seeds Thought To Be Latest Target By Chinese
I'm picturing a new mall store called "Off Topic." It's filled with disgruntled employees and shoppers, with their own ideas about how a store should be run, and suggestions for merchandise without any regard to, well, the topic actually relevant to the designated sale point at the end of the day.

Comment: Re: Oy (Score 3, Insightful) 683

by kittylu (#46073195) Attached to: VC Likens Google Bus Backlash To Nazi Rampage
The stated issue and victim of obfuscation in this argument is that Google as a private company has been (knowingly) violating the law by using public bus stops in transporting employees without formal permission, let alone any discussion of compensation and guidelines to offset disruption of the public. Secondarily, the city of San Francisco was essentially letting Google get away with doing so until they could no longer ignore the outcry over the situation. Transportation is highly regulated, and Google has been effectively exempt from following the rules governing its counterparts as a part of some special class. And while many other complexities abound here, it can't be emphasized enough that corporations always want to be treated as very special people, but are established as entities to avoid the same financial and social responsibilities expected from the rest of us.
Science

+ - Early exposure to germs has lasting benefits->

Submitted by ananyo
ananyo (2519492) writes "Exposure to germs in childhood is thought to help strengthen the immune system and protect children from developing allergies and asthma, but the pathways by which this occurs have been unclear. Now, researchers have identified a mechanism in mice that may explain the role of exposure to microbes in the development of asthma and ulcerative colitis, a common form of inflammatory bowel disease .
The researchers show that in mice, exposure to microbes in early life can reduce the body’s inventory of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, which help to fight infection but can also turn on the body, causing a range of disorders such as asthma or inflammatory bowel disease (abstract).
The study supports the 'hygiene hypothesis', which contends that such auto-immune diseases are more common in the developed world where the prevalence of antibiotics and antibacterials reduce children’s exposure to microbes."

Link to Original Source

+ - What's Not to Like About New iPad?

Submitted by
Hugh Pickens writes
Hugh Pickens writes writes "With 3 million sold over the last week what’s not to like about the new iPad? Michelle Maltais at the LA Times does a good job of putting together a compendium of gripes about the new device, justified or otherwise. Most people thought that Siri on the new iPad was a gimme.- instead it has a scaled back version — dictation. "If you want Siri, buy an iPhone. Plain and simple." The new iPad is a little heavier than the iPad 2, thanks to the better graphics processor and more powerful battery. At one-tenth of a pound heavier that really doesn't sound like much, but it can start to matter if you hold your iPad in one hand for long periods or have any kind of repetitive stress injury. Apps designed for Retina display can be up to five times bigger and it's not just a problem for owners of the new iPad. Legacy owners of the original and iPad 2 who have these apps get to feel the pain too, since updates aren't device specific. The hot-selling device can reach up to 116 degrees during intensive use, according to a test by the Consumer Reports. PCWorld tested 43 tablets and found that the third-gen iPad takes the longest — almost six hours — to fully recharge its battery. You'll love the blistering speed of the 4G iPad, you won't love blowing through your monthly data allotment in just 24 hours if you use streaming video. A number of customers have been complaining on the Apple Support page about a weaker Wi-Fi connection that in some cases will hold a connection for only a few minutes. And last, whatever you do, don't drop the new iPad. From waist height, the damage to the third-gen iPad is fairly extensive. "Only a small portion of the screen survived.""

Comment: Conflicted (Score 1) 556

by kittylu (#37727110) Attached to: Is Apple Pushing Away Professionals?
As a 22-year pro/consumer user of Apple, I can't really complain... Infinitely more beautiful, useful, productive, and easier-to-use, more stable products than I've ever used. My MacBook Pro, iPhone, and iPad are amazing. OTH, my Quad Core tower at the office is a mess... And isolating the problems requires a close labor intensity of the plague-ridden Quadras and PowerPCs from the 90s. But this is primarily because, as the odd man out at the office, I literally have to "do it all." I put together psentations and proposals for an ad agency, which requires being fluent in multiple versions of both Adobe CS and Microsoft Office on both Apple and Windows. (And don't get me started about how equally sloppy and conflict-ridden both CS5 and Office 2011 are.) With that out of the way, I still find Apple to be more user friendly across the board. There was an interesting article in thiis week's WSJ about how more Fortune 500 companies are embracing the iPhone over other mobile devices, particularly Android, because it is so much easier to manage in terms of security... But low-end consumers opt for Android devices for the price point. My company already follows Apple strategy... While the IT department helped me set up my iPhone, I set up my laptop and new iPad all on my own. For better or worse, once I'm plugged in, I'm in.... So, while there is more from Hidden Valley than just ranch dressing, it all depends on the options the user has at the salad bar, in terms of toppings and dressings.

Comment: Yoga (Score 2) 235

by kittylu (#37726790) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Ergonomic Office Environment?
I'm not the expert, but I can attest anecdotally, that yoga accomplishes this exactly as it was ascribed by my chiropractor, my teachers, and my friends who practice. The beauty of yoga is the simplicity... Using only the body in terms of strength, stretching, and resistance to actually reverse the effects of sitting at a computer for eight-plus hours a day. And everyone who knows me and my practice says it has made me an infinitely better person. (And vastly improved my dating life.)

Comment: Re:Exercise (Score 1) 235

by kittylu (#37726260) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: Ergonomic Office Environment?
I spend long hours at a computer in advertising. I started to suffer early symptoms of carpal tunnel just over ten years ago, in addition to the constant back pain alleviated by fairly frequent chiropractic treatment. The first thing I did for the carpal tunnel was move my mouse to the left, and use a Wacom tablet on the right. It helped, but wasn't a complete panacea. The second thing I did really changed my life: yoga. My neck, shoulders, back, and wrists have been virtually pain free in the just over eight years I've been practicing. Always a skinny, non-athletic type of guy, I gained weight with muscle tone, and greatly improved my posture and flexibility. It literally saved my life. And at 47 I can totally keep up with the twenty-somethings.

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