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Comment: Re:Nonsense. (Score 1) 192

by kinnell (#47091461) Attached to: Mental Illness Reduces Lifespan As Much as Smoking

it's not clear how mental disorders could be causing early deaths.

This is a positively idiotic statement.

It simply means that there is not enough scientific data to support any hypothesis conclusively, not that they have no clue whatsoever. Do you have any data to back up your hypothesis or is it just "common sense"?

Comment: Re:But do they need it? (Score 1) 113

by kinnell (#46629165) Attached to: Astronauts' Hearts Change Shape In Space
More to the point, I wonder if a more spherical shape isn't more efficient in micro gravity and this is what drives the change. The heart no longer has to pump blood uphill, so it would stand to reason that a shape which generates less force while using less energy would be optimum, and out bodies tend to be pretty good at finding the most energy efficient way of adapting to the environment they are in.

Comment: Re:Calories (Score 2) 440

by kinnell (#45411397) Attached to: Soylent: No Food For 30 Days

Counting calories is a very effective way to lose/gain weight. Sure you don't know *exactly* how many your body is burning, but if you don't lose or gain weight at 3000 calories, and maintain the same lifestyle, you can be sure that you will lose about a pound a week at 2500 calories, or gain a pound a week at 3500 calories/day. Sure not everybody wants to or has to do that, but it works.

When you restrict calories in, the first thing that happens is your body lowers it's energy expenditure by making you tired and lowering non-essential processes in the body. Then it will catabolise muscle, because muscle is more expensive metabolically than fat. Only then will it start to lower fat. You will get to your target weight, but you will have less muscle mass (unhealthy in itself) burning less energy and a body which thinks it's in a state of famine and will drive you to binge eat to increase fat stores whenever food is available. In short you will lose weight but will set yourself up for even more weight gain in the future, or at least a lifetime of chronic stress inducing hunger. This is why 98% of people who do calorie restriction diets fail.

Comment: Re:Oblig (Score 0) 214

by kinnell (#45090071) Attached to: TEPCO Workers Remove Wrong Pipe Get Splashed With Radioactive Water
What we have here as far as I can see is two incidents caused by human error in which there were no serious consequences. What's the news, that humans make mistakes? If people can make stupid mistakes in a nuclear power station and not cause any serious problems it just shows that the systems and procedures in place are well designed and managed.

Comment: Re:This is not new (Score 1) 158

by kinnell (#42679175) Attached to: The Mathematics of the Lifespan of Species

humans have, of course, cheated death to some extent, so we're outliers, though it is worth noting that prehistoric humans had a max. lifespan of around 40 years...

No. prehistoric humans had a life expectancy of 25-40 years. Life expectancy is the mean age at death not the maximum lifespan. Given that we are genetically identical to prehistoric man, I think it's fair to say that they're maximum lifespan was somewhere between 100 and 120 years just like us.

Comment: Re:Remove the obvious structural weaknesses (Score 1) 384

by kinnell (#42300865) Attached to: White House Must Answer Petition To 'Build Death Star'

Childs play - I used to bullseye womp rats in my T-16 back home, they're not much bigger than two meters.

You hurt small animals for fun as a kid? You must be some kind of psychopath.

Sooo, how many meters long are the medium-sized animals on your planet? And about the large ones...

I don't think they exist

Comment: Re:But that's not the real problem. (Score 3, Funny) 1651

by kinnell (#41536725) Attached to: To Encourage Biking, Lose the Helmets
The problem I have is that all the issues you raise also apply to pedestrians, yet suggest to a pro-helmet cyclist that they should wear a helmet when walking across the road and they just laugh. I have no problem with people wearing helmets, in fact I would encourage it, but I want the choice for myself.

Comment: Re:The reason is simple. (Score 1) 513

by kinnell (#41536629) Attached to: Why Ultrabooks Are Falling Well Short of Intel's Targets

Although I wanted to punch a hole in the wall when I had to buy a Thunderbolt cable for $50 0_o, there is no reason they should be that expensive but that is Apple pricing for you.

Thunderbolt uses active cables. There is a circuit at each end of the cable which handles the physical transmission. This means the cables will always be expensive, although costs will probably come down if thunderbolt becomes mainstream and economies of scale kick in. It's also a reason why thunderbolt probably won't become mainstream.

Comment: Re:"Einstein's brain, that revolutionized physics. (Score 3, Insightful) 66

by kinnell (#41476069) Attached to: iPad App Offers Detailed Images of Einstein's Brain
I also find the idea that there was something unique about Einstein's brain that made him a genius. IMHO what set him apart wasn't his academic brilliance, which was nothing special going by his school performance, it was his ability to think up daft questions like "if I were riding a light beam and shone a torch in front of me, how fast would the light from the torch travel?".

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